Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 . . . 27 NEXT
 

On the Basis of Sex (5/10)

Oh Felicity Jones, what happened? First you play Jyn Erso in a lead role, then let me down, then you play Ruth Ginsberg, and let me down. Maybe I should just stop watching you.

...okay, maybe not, but I wanted to get that joke out of the way. But the thing is, no, I didn't like this film. And maybe I'm just the wrong audience for this film (or if you want to play that card, the wrong gender). But whatever my own biases, I still didn't like this movie.

Thing is, I'm sure there's an interesting story to tell here. Looking at the real Ruth Ginsberg, and the case the film focuses on, both seem interesting. Unfortunately, the film doesn't do a good job in making me interested. Because while this is a 'legal film' unlike better examples in this genre, it doesn't really do much to guide plebes like myself along. Because there's legalese here. A lot of it. The film keeps throwing out terms and concepts, and we're expected to know what they are. Now, maybe some people know what they are. I saw the film with my parents, both of whom are/were lawyers, and they not only understood all the legalese, but loved it. But me...remember the Phantom Menace, where a common complaint in the film is that the senate scenes are bogged down by buracracy? Imagine that feeling, just extending throughout the majority of a film's runtime.

And don't say that the film can't be interesting to us plebes because of its genre. I remember The Social Network for instance, where a lot of the film is simply dealing with depositions, but it's directed/written in such a way that it's rivetting. OBS isn't. Even something like A Civil Action found a way to present itself in an interesting manner (granted, that was environmental law, and I was doing environmental management at the time), because while that film's very dry, there was still far more of a sense of flow to it. OBS however, doesn't really have a sense of flow. It doesn't have a sense of "oomph," despite its subject matter. I'm sure there was a way to make this story interesting, but be it the writing or directing, that isn't the case here.

Alita: Battle Angel. The best live action adaption of an anime/manga ever made. Aside from Edge of Tomorrow. This movie met my expectations, I can't wait to get it on Blu Ray. The movie does drag a little, but it's not a big deal, and if you're a fan of sci-fi or manga in general, you owe it to yourself to see it. Can't wait for the sequel.

Also Alita: Battle Angel

I feel like I should have been the easiest mark ever for this. A cyberpunk action movie based on a manga with implicit themes of class struggle, starring a hot robot chick? You'd think it was made for me. But it just didn't connect and that frustrates me.

Alita, for example should be a likeable protagonist. The movie certainly tries it's hardest to make her one, spending the entire first quarter of the movie running through town with childlike wonderment in her digitally enhanced doe eyes and saving a small dog in the very beginning in what I have to assume was James Cameron remembering a book on screenwriting he once read. But somehow her personality never grows beyond being some sort of very violent Disney Princess.

You can clearly tell that this movie is based on a fairly long running manga and that whoever made it cared a whole lot about it but what that means is that it sure likes to elaborate on its own backstory. A lot of the first half is Alita, who has no memory of her past, having things explained to her by either her father figure or her love interest which means that much of the dialogue might as well be dramatic readings of various wiki articles.

The actual plot is a pretty erratic affair. First Alita is an assistant to her doctor/scientist/bounty hunter father, then she becomes a bounty hunter herself, then she becomes an athlete, for some reason... it all feels like an abridged version of a much longer story, that was presumably told in the manga.

I got the feeling that visually, the movie isn't gonna age very well. It's fine artistically, all the androids have pretty memorable designs and what we see of its world looks good. Most of it set in a dystopian city named Iron City that looks somewhat like Havana, if they restored capitalism. The actual effects though, while certainly state of the art now, are gonna date the movie for sure. Even now I felt that large parts of it looked like a video game. Chances are, it's not gonna hold up.

One of the things that really worked about the movie, a but surprisingly, because there aren't many, is the relationship between Alita and her father figure, who's played by Christoph Waltz. Rhere's a genuine humanity and believability to their interactions which seems entirely absent from all other character interactions. Especially the romance was something that didn't work for me at all.

Overall I'm sure there's an audience for this but I'm quite complacent not being part of it. I really wanted to like the movie, I sat in the theater thinking that I should be enjoying myself, but I wasn't. I felt it missed more often than it hit.

Overlord

Enjoyed it, but other movies did the nazi zombie subgenre better. Like, I found the action and atmosphere in Outpost way better and the weird nazi experiments were done way better in Frankenstein's Army. I would also add Dead Snow in the mix but it's obvious Overlord didn't went for slapstick comedy even if it doesn't take itself overly serious.

Vice

Pretty good, but I didn't really like how they portrayed Rumsfeld. Steve Carell did play him really well but his precise and analytical character didn't really come across. Rummy is such a shrewd thinker and could worm himself out of pretty much everything. I also really enjoyed his memoires ''known and unknown'' as a window into his thoughts. However none of the really authentic Rumsfeld comes across in the movie contrary to Cheney which was just brilliantly portrayed by Christian Bale. The popular narrative this movie relies on that Bush' presidency was hijacked by the neocons with Cheney as a sort of Rasputin might be a bit overwrought it was Bale's usual stellar performance that kept the movie interesting.

Alita Battle Angel.

For one, I am unfamiliar with the source material, so I don't know how much of this is criticism of the movie being faithful to the source vs the movie itself.

1: No, there was literally no reason for her face. I thought it would have been like 'Ok, the robot people have these faces', nope, literally just her. Could have just used a real human face.

2. This movie has the Godzilla problem, you know, where the parts with Godzilla were freaking awesome, but the rest was not so much? In this case, robot fights. The fights were actually really cool, like watching a video game, in a good way. If the movie was like, 90% that, I would have said it was good. But no, lets waste most of the movie on a shitty romance plot. REMINDER: HETEROSEXUALITY IS SHOVED IN OUR FACES ALL THE FUCKING TIME!!!! (This was likely lifted from the manga though)

3. So, can we PLEASE stop having bad guys take too long to do the thing so the hero can stop them? Villains, stop creeping slowly when you could have just killed them and be done with it, fucking seriously, just stab him! If you want the hero to save someone in time, then just have them arrive sooner.

4. Specific spoiler time: Fuck the whole Hugo being wanted for murder bit. ALL HE HAD TO DO WAS TELL ALITA HE WAS SET UP! She would have 100% believed him, cause it was 100% true, fucking hell. She knows that guy was a bad guy, she would have been like 'Oh, good, now I will kick his ass' but no, instead you gush about all this other stuff she never knew or was even suspicious of and even then you never tell her you were set up, you fucking died and as far as she knew, she let you get away with murdering an innocent guy.

Its a bad movie with some cool parts, but your dumb friends will pretend it is good because they don't care.

Oh and it completely expects to have a part 2.

Velvet Buzzsaw (2019)

I loved the characters and the story involving the world of seemingly ultra-shallow art dealers, artists and critics. Rene Russo was stronger in Nightcrawlers, but was still a treat to watch. Gyllenhaal was great- really, that could have been the whole movie, these betrayals and schemes between these people.

But the let-down for me was the horror- it felt like the movie should have been Dusk 'till Dawned, with another director working on the horror aspects. The horrific backstory for the mysterious painter is about as cliche as the genre gets, and in my opinion could have been glossed over more, though it sortof felt like part of the message here was that such things can't be that mysterious anymore. The horror aspect felt rushed, the actual assaults themselves unavoidable, which is characteristic as a bad trope in nebulous, super-prescient supernatural horror stories, and the CG, while not horrible, raises some technical questions about trying to capture the supernatural vibe in a painting/series of images, while not feeling... well, blatantly CG.

Still worth watching for the performances, in my opinion.

What Men Want (Spoilers)

I didn't hate it, but I do regret watching it. I wouldn't have gone if my sister didn't talk me into it and she wouldn't have gone if she knew it was a BET production.

Taraji's character, Ali, is just awful. I don't mind how aggressive she is at work, co-workers and boss suck, but the way she treats her friends, love interest, and assistant is just god awful. She doesn't deserve her any of the people around her. It's a problem a lot of characters in these comedies have. The plot is incredibly predictable. The film introduces us to the various characters in her life, she ruins everything, then fixes everything with some nice words. Poof, got all her friends back, got her man, and seemingly stopped being such a jackass to her former assistant/new agent.

What I hate most about these comedies is that they handle their themes with as much subtlety as a sledgehammer. I don't need the movie to constantly remind me that Ali is a woman. I have eyes I can fucking see. I don't need the film to repeat over and over that she's trying to break into a boy's club, the meeting scene full of men with only two women in sight and a guy who looks like he still wears diapers getting the promotion over Ali makes it crystal clear. And that's everywhere! The characters just blurt out what the moral of the story is

The lesson Ali learns at the end of the film is "Honesty is the best policy", but that isn't what kicks this off. It isn't lying that prevents her from getting her promotion. It isn't lying that ruins her friendship or her relationship with her assistant. It's her selfishness. She only looks out for number one, and that's what ruins everything for her. The only proper arc Ali goes through is from a cold, competitive, selfish woman who can't get any and is bad with children to a kinder, softer, but still competitive woman who is now miraculously great with kids.

tl;dr Everything in this movie is cliche and uninspired.

Captain Marvelous:
What Men Want

tl;dr Everything in this movie is cliche and uninspired.

So...keeping to the spirit of the original then?

The Lego Movie--5/10

I...edon't get why people liked this thing. I'm giving it a five because I didn't outright hate it, and it had a few neat moments, but not enough to prop up a movie.

The Lego Batman movie--7/10

Still not sure why this was like the greatest thing since sliced bread, except maybe that it got points for not being the brooding nightmare hellscape Batman of the DCEU, but it had more of a charm than TLM, so I bumped it a couple points higher. I should probably dock it for having a Robin I liked less than Chris O'Donnell, but I guess it slides under the line.

I tend not to weight movies super low unless I actively hate them, but I kind of think middle scores are a bigger curse, because they generally go to movies too boring for me to say much.

2001: A Space Odyssey ---- 9/10.

The one point to take away is the first couple of scenes with David Bowmen and Frank as they get ready for their trip to Jupiter. The whole planning part and boardroom discussions and Dave talking with his kid was boring.

This whole movie could have also been a complete silent movie because its the non-talking parts that are the best.

Ninja Assassin (4/5) - A good ninja action film that deserved a sequel. I don't know what the critics were on about, and it's sad the film didn't do well in theaters. Yeah, it was that time when Hollywood had dump months in January, but this movie was well done compared to films that relied too much on shaky cam or were all going for the washed out color palette.
I admit that I did not see in theaters, but that was due to lack of time when the film came out. By that point, I just waited for the DVD. This movie is the best Ninja Gaiden adaption we are ever going to get. The only thing missing are demons.

PsychedelicDiamond:
Also Alita: Battle Angel

I feel like I should have been the easiest mark ever for this. A cyberpunk action movie based on a manga with implicit themes of class struggle, starring a hot robot chick? You'd think it was made for me. But it just didn't connect and that frustrates me.

Alita, for example should be a likeable protagonist. The movie certainly tries it's hardest to make her one, spending the entire first quarter of the movie running through town with childlike wonderment in her digitally enhanced doe eyes and saving a small dog in the very beginning in what I have to assume was James Cameron remembering a book on screenwriting he once read. But somehow her personality never grows beyond being some sort of very violent Disney Princess.

You can clearly tell that this movie is based on a fairly long running manga and that whoever made it cared a whole lot about it but what that means is that it sure likes to elaborate on its own backstory. A lot of the first half is Alita, who has no memory of her past, having things explained to her by either her father figure or her love interest which means that much of the dialogue might as well be dramatic readings of various wiki articles.

The actual plot is a pretty erratic affair. First Alita is an assistant to her doctor/scientist/bounty hunter father, then she becomes a bounty hunter herself, then she becomes an athlete, for some reason... it all feels like an abridged version of a much longer story, that was presumably told in the manga.

I got the feeling that visually, the movie isn't gonna age very well. It's fine artistically, all the androids have pretty memorable designs and what we see of its world looks good. Most of it set in a dystopian city named Iron City that looks somewhat like Havana, if they restored capitalism. The actual effects though, while certainly state of the art now, are gonna date the movie for sure. Even now I felt that large parts of it looked like a video game. Chances are, it's not gonna hold up.

One of the things that really worked about the movie, a but surprisingly, because there aren't many, is the relationship between Alita and her father figure, who's played by Christoph Waltz. Rhere's a genuine humanity and believability to their interactions which seems entirely absent from all other character interactions. Especially the romance was something that didn't work for me at all.

Overall I'm sure there's an audience for this but I'm quite complacent not being part of it. I really wanted to like the movie, I sat in the theater thinking that I should be enjoying myself, but I wasn't. I felt it missed more often than it hit.

This video explains why people and the audience love the movie so much.

I get some of your criticisms, but I thought the film was awesome overall and was not afraid to shy away or be embarrassed about its source material, unlike other American adaptions of manga/anime. Nor adaptions of certain Western comics from the past that either tried to downplay/doing in the wizard, because Hollywood thought the ideas either being too "weird or strange".

Samtemdo8:
2001: A Space Odyssey ---- 9/10.

The one point to take away is the first couple of scenes with David Bowmen and Frank as they get ready for their trip to Jupiter. The whole planning part and boardroom discussions and Dave talking with his kid was boring.

This whole movie could have also been a complete silent movie because its the non-talking parts that are the best.

You might be a little confused. Bowman and Poole don't appear in the film until the Discovery is introduced, already on it's way to Jupiter. All the stuff about the space station and the moon is centered around Dr. Floyd, who makes a very brief reappearance after that on the video recording late in the film.

To be fair though, none of the characters really stand out much, other then HAL.

mortal engines
Are they fucking kidding with that horror chord crescendo on the women's scar reveal as if it wasn't the mildest, coolest scar any performer with a pretty face would be totally fine with it actually not ruining their natural aesthetic whatsoever? That's the most ridiculous part of this almost visually interesting, promising disappointment. Will have to check out the books instead. The imagination is certainly more cost effective than CGI.

ready player one
Jesus christ, Hollywood. What is it with you and this insultingly shallow female face crap? It's utterly shameless. No really, stop it, please for your own good. Ffs nevermind. All that fancy CGI action yet I felt nothing. Ok, part shame maybe. But that could be from any source including repressed childhood trauma. And no, the book can sincerely bugger off, thankyou.

aquaman
Not enough Dimmu Borgir. Come on, that pitifully weak distorted guitar chord you teased earlier just ain't gonna cut that look now, is it? The nonsense underwater CGI fish battle was most engaging part though, weirdly. If that's in the book, then I'll bite. (Tehe!)

blockers
*Weary sigh*
Even with the brain fully prepared, expecting plenty of dumb entertainment, all relevant defenses raised and thoughts clinically asphyxiated, there's always something that comes along and feels like it's still killing off a sizeable chunk of innocent, probably hard-working brain cells. Though this one's heart is in the right place with some hint of a positive message or two, if it were a book it would get a minimum headshake of caring disapproval before being flung into the mysterious eternal bonfire currently refusing to die in the living room.

Hey. Where the good films at? Who's picking these? This can't be an entirely negative run, surely? Are movies bad forever now? Can feel. Faith slipping. One more. There has to be one more around...somewhere...

daddy's home
Nope!

Detroit
Oh alright, captain overcompensation. What a horrific, tense, dread inducing experience. Humanity is the worst. Except when they make something like this, expertly reminding us of how they're the worst. Am a firm believer in there isn't much scarier than the realities of the human condition, and for something that doesn't make any posturing, this felt far closer to what horror is than 95% of the genre claims to be. It lingers in the mind and stomach long after watching. So undeniably is achieving what it intends to. Finally things are ok with film again! unlike the rest of the real world

The Predator (2018)

Dear. God. :(

A little background - I have quite an extensive movie collection (over 1,200), and a sizable chunk of that movie collection is comprised of hammy, B-movie horror flicks. I *like* bad movies. In many ways, you cannot beat a good bad movie. I like the cliches, I like the bad effects, and I like the plotholes you can drive a bus through. K? Got that? Right, because bearing all that in mind, here we go:

The Predator has to be in the *worst* half-dozen films I have ever seen. Ever. It is an appalling, dumb, badly written, badly acted, poorly thought out piece of tripe. Save yourself 100 minutes of your life and never, *ever*, even entertain watching this one.

*shudder*

Grouchy Imp:
The Predator (2018)

Dear. God. :(

A little background - I have quite an extensive movie collection (over 1,200), and a sizable chunk of that movie collection is comprised of hammy, B-movie horror flicks. I *like* bad movies. In many ways, you cannot beat a good bad movie. I like the cliches, I like the bad effects, and I like the plotholes you can drive a bus through. K? Got that? Right, because bearing all that in mind, here we go:

The Predator has to be in the *worst* half-dozen films I have ever seen. Ever. It is an appalling, dumb, badly written, badly acted, poorly thought out piece of tripe. Save yourself 100 minutes of your life and never, *ever*, even entertain watching this one.

*shudder*

Worse the Alien vs Predator II: Requiem?

Dalisclock:

Samtemdo8:
2001: A Space Odyssey ---- 9/10.

The one point to take away is the first couple of scenes with David Bowmen and Frank as they get ready for their trip to Jupiter. The whole planning part and boardroom discussions and Dave talking with his kid was boring.

This whole movie could have also been a complete silent movie because its the non-talking parts that are the best.

You might be a little confused. Bowman and Poole don't appear in the film until the Discovery is introduced, already on it's way to Jupiter. All the stuff about the space station and the moon is centered around Dr. Floyd, who makes a very brief reappearance after that on the video recording late in the film.

To be fair though, none of the characters really stand out much, other then HAL.

I am have been made aware that there was a sequel to the movie. 2010.

Was it good or the most disappointing thing before the Star Wars Prequels?

Samtemdo8:

I am have been made aware that there was a sequel to the movie. 2010.

Was it good or the most disappointing thing before the Star Wars Prequels?

2010, IMO, is not only a good movie, but better than 2001, which is a case of a lacklustre movie being adapted from an absolutely excellent novel.

But that's not a common opinion.

CoCage:

PsychedelicDiamond:
Also Alita: Battle Angel

I feel like I should have been the easiest mark ever for this. A cyberpunk action movie based on a manga with implicit themes of class struggle, starring a hot robot chick? You'd think it was made for me. But it just didn't connect and that frustrates me.

Alita, for example should be a likeable protagonist. The movie certainly tries it's hardest to make her one, spending the entire first quarter of the movie running through town with childlike wonderment in her digitally enhanced doe eyes and saving a small dog in the very beginning in what I have to assume was James Cameron remembering a book on screenwriting he once read. But somehow her personality never grows beyond being some sort of very violent Disney Princess.

You can clearly tell that this movie is based on a fairly long running manga and that whoever made it cared a whole lot about it but what that means is that it sure likes to elaborate on its own backstory. A lot of the first half is Alita, who has no memory of her past, having things explained to her by either her father figure or her love interest which means that much of the dialogue might as well be dramatic readings of various wiki articles.

The actual plot is a pretty erratic affair. First Alita is an assistant to her doctor/scientist/bounty hunter father, then she becomes a bounty hunter herself, then she becomes an athlete, for some reason... it all feels like an abridged version of a much longer story, that was presumably told in the manga.

I got the feeling that visually, the movie isn't gonna age very well. It's fine artistically, all the androids have pretty memorable designs and what we see of its world looks good. Most of it set in a dystopian city named Iron City that looks somewhat like Havana, if they restored capitalism. The actual effects though, while certainly state of the art now, are gonna date the movie for sure. Even now I felt that large parts of it looked like a video game. Chances are, it's not gonna hold up.

One of the things that really worked about the movie, a but surprisingly, because there aren't many, is the relationship between Alita and her father figure, who's played by Christoph Waltz. Rhere's a genuine humanity and believability to their interactions which seems entirely absent from all other character interactions. Especially the romance was something that didn't work for me at all.

Overall I'm sure there's an audience for this but I'm quite complacent not being part of it. I really wanted to like the movie, I sat in the theater thinking that I should be enjoying myself, but I wasn't. I felt it missed more often than it hit.

This video explains why people and the audience love the movie so much.

I get some of your criticisms, but I though the film was awesome overall ans was not afraid to shy away or be embarrassed about its source material, unlike other American adaptions of manga/anime. Nor adaptions of certain Western comics from the past that either tried to downplay/doing in the wizard, because Hollywood thought the ideas either being too "weird or strange".

That's where I don't really agree. Alita had some pretty inventive visual ideas, mostly character design and the look of its world, but otherwise I don't think it's too different from the young adult "plucky teenage heroine fights an oppressive system in the dystopian future" fare we've seen a lot of in the wake of Hunger Games. And I am aware, of course, that the source material predates those movies and the novels they're based on, but as a movie it doesn't do much to set itself apart from them, I feel. Aside from, spoiler, killing off the love interest, I guess.

Maybe I'm too harsh on the movie, it was mostly competently executed and if you'd ask me I'd much rather have people see a predictable but overall decent movie about class struggle and teenage rebellion in a Cyberpunk world directed by and starring a latinx person than the newest iteration of conveyor belt Marvel Disney US Military wank. Overall I want the movie to be popular and I wouldn't mind a sequel but it didn't excite me the way it seemed to excite some people.

Mandy

It's one of those 'it's not what you say it's how you say it' type deals, and this movie says it with the freakiest-ass whale voice. Can't really explain it, but it certainly was an experience. And despite how artsy-fartsy it is, it really doesn't come across as indulgent or dragging. It actually has a pretty brisk pace to it.

Nicolas Cage is used to great effect and only once has a real goofy Cage moment. For the rest he gives a very sincere performance.

Samtemdo8:

Grouchy Imp:
The Predator (2018)

Dear. God. :(

A little background - I have quite an extensive movie collection (over 1,200), and a sizable chunk of that movie collection is comprised of hammy, B-movie horror flicks. I *like* bad movies. In many ways, you cannot beat a good bad movie. I like the cliches, I like the bad effects, and I like the plotholes you can drive a bus through. K? Got that? Right, because bearing all that in mind, here we go:

The Predator has to be in the *worst* half-dozen films I have ever seen. Ever. It is an appalling, dumb, badly written, badly acted, poorly thought out piece of tripe. Save yourself 100 minutes of your life and never, *ever*, even entertain watching this one.

*shudder*

Worse the Alien vs Predator II: Requiem?

Yup. At least AvP2 was reimagining the series in a 'teen slasher horror' vein. As misguided as that may have been, at least it had a consistent theme. This new offering is just so confused. We jump, scene to scene, from 80s action parody to tongue-in-cheek comedy to heartwarming family morality lesson (I shit you not) then back to 80 action parody and so on.

Hawki:

Samtemdo8:

I am have been made aware that there was a sequel to the movie. 2010.

Was it good or the most disappointing thing before the Star Wars Prequels?

2010, IMO, is not only a good movie, but better than 2001, which is a case of a lacklustre movie being adapted from an absolutely excellent novel.

But that's not a common opinion.

It was going for a very different thing that 2001, I'd say it was more a space ghost story thingy, and works at that.

Samtemdo8:

Dalisclock:

Samtemdo8:
2001: A Space Odyssey ---- 9/10.

The one point to take away is the first couple of scenes with David Bowmen and Frank as they get ready for their trip to Jupiter. The whole planning part and boardroom discussions and Dave talking with his kid was boring.

This whole movie could have also been a complete silent movie because its the non-talking parts that are the best.

You might be a little confused. Bowman and Poole don't appear in the film until the Discovery is introduced, already on it's way to Jupiter. All the stuff about the space station and the moon is centered around Dr. Floyd, who makes a very brief reappearance after that on the video recording late in the film.

To be fair though, none of the characters really stand out much, other then HAL.

I am have been made aware that there was a sequel to the movie. 2010.

Was it good or the most disappointing thing before the Star Wars Prequels?

It's very different. Yeah, it follows the plot more or less but the tone isn't nearly the same. 2001 can feel very much like an Art Movie at times, whereas 2010 is a lot more like a standard hollywood sci-fi flick. It's not terrible but it feels very steeped in the cold war.

Captain Marvel.

Earth has been invaded how many times now? Anyway, it was kinda fun some times but mostly bland. Brie's fine but there's nothing much to the character. Action was whatever, Sam Jackson was fun, Coulson looks uncanny, Mendehlson should open a rent-a-villain shop, Annette's great but underused. I've already forgotten the first hour. Let's never think about it ever again.

Casual Shinji:
Mandy

It's one of those 'it's not what you say it's how you say it' type deals, and this movie says it with the freakiest-ass whale voice. Can't really explain it, but it certainly was an experience. And despite how artsy-fartsy it is, it really doesn't come across as indulgent or dragging. It actually has a pretty brisk pace to it.

Nicolas Cage is used to great effect and only once has a real goofy Cage moment. For the rest he gives a very sincere performance.

It's the bathroom scene isn't it?

Johnny Novgorod:
Let's never think about it ever again.

Oh Johnny.

Given that this is an MCU film, coupled with it "pushing the feminist agenda," you know deep down that that isn't going to happen.

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:
Let's never think about it ever again.

Oh Johnny.

Given that this is an MCU film, coupled with it "pushing the feminist agenda," you know deep down that that isn't going to happen.

I mean props from veering from Marvel's Type A serious/condescending female partnered with an immature yet loveable twat, but Carol doesn't have much of a personality and neither does the movie. It's not even "about" feminism, the gender seems largely incidental. It's supposed to give Carol an underdog backstory (ie. daddy issues, bullied by dudebros as kid) but then doesn't everybody have one in these movies?

Johnny Novgorod:

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:
Let's never think about it ever again.

Oh Johnny.

Given that this is an MCU film, coupled with it "pushing the feminist agenda," you know deep down that that isn't going to happen.

I mean props from veering from Marvel's Type A serious/condescending female partnered with a immature yet loveable twat, but Carol doesn't have much of a personality and neither does the movie. It's not even "about" feminism, the gender seems largely incidental. It's supposed to give Carol an underdog backstory (ie. daddy issues, bullied by dudebros as kid) but then doesn't everybody have one in these movies?

Isn't that what anti-SJWs have been pushing all along. That the gender doesnt matter

trunkage:

Johnny Novgorod:

Hawki:

Oh Johnny.

Given that this is an MCU film, coupled with it "pushing the feminist agenda," you know deep down that that isn't going to happen.

I mean props from veering from Marvel's Type A serious/condescending female partnered with a immature yet loveable twat, but Carol doesn't have much of a personality and neither does the movie. It's not even "about" feminism, the gender seems largely incidental. It's supposed to give Carol an underdog backstory (ie. daddy issues, bullied by dudebros as kid) but then doesn't everybody have one in these movies?

Isn't that what anti-SJWs have been pushing all along. That the gender doesnt matter

No, anti-SJWs have been pushing that no one should ever be allowed to have what straight white men have, because 'fuck you, got mine'.

Grouchy Imp:

Samtemdo8:

Grouchy Imp:
The Predator (2018)

Dear. God. :(

A little background - I have quite an extensive movie collection (over 1,200), and a sizable chunk of that movie collection is comprised of hammy, B-movie horror flicks. I *like* bad movies. In many ways, you cannot beat a good bad movie. I like the cliches, I like the bad effects, and I like the plotholes you can drive a bus through. K? Got that? Right, because bearing all that in mind, here we go:

The Predator has to be in the *worst* half-dozen films I have ever seen. Ever. It is an appalling, dumb, badly written, badly acted, poorly thought out piece of tripe. Save yourself 100 minutes of your life and never, *ever*, even entertain watching this one.

*shudder*

Worse the Alien vs Predator II: Requiem?

Yup. At least AvP2 was reimagining the series in a 'teen slasher horror' vein. As misguided as that may have been, at least it had a consistent theme. This new offering is just so confused. We jump, scene to scene, from 80s action parody to tongue-in-cheek comedy to heartwarming family morality lesson (I shit you not) then back to 80 action parody and so on.

I don't know, I found Requiem unpleasant to sit through and couldn't get past the godawful cinematography.

Natemans:

I don't know, I found Requiem unpleasant to sit through and couldn't get past the godawful cinematography.

While I liked The Predator more than most, there's no way it's worse than Requiem.

Then again, few films are worse than Requiem.

Natemans:

Grouchy Imp:

Samtemdo8:

Worse the Alien vs Predator II: Requiem?

Yup. At least AvP2 was reimagining the series in a 'teen slasher horror' vein. As misguided as that may have been, at least it had a consistent theme. This new offering is just so confused. We jump, scene to scene, from 80s action parody to tongue-in-cheek comedy to heartwarming family morality lesson (I shit you not) then back to 80 action parody and so on.

I don't know, I found Requiem unpleasant to sit through and couldn't get past the godawful cinematography.

Oh, I never said I *liked* Requiem! :)

I would have considered it the weakest of the franchise had it not been for this new installment.

Spiderman Spiderverse

Pretty enjoyable for both old and young fans alike. Really liked the nostalgic references and the way it kind of merged Spidey's origin story as a sort of meta-narrative. They fused together so many parts of the character's history while still making a story that feels original and fresh. The animation was also top notch and a particular style I haven't really seen before. Great movie all around even if the ending felt like an acid trip inside a bubblegum machine.

Creed 2

Or I guess, Rocky 4 part 2? Surprisingly enjoyable with some great performances and without going overboard with the Rocky references. Similar as Creed 1 I guess but I think 2 is a bit better simply b/c of Lundgren whose character Ivan Drago was just the right amount of hammy. Rocky was his usual stumbling self but being this worn out long retired fighter with a heart of gold does make the character feel really grounded. Really cool when Rocky and Drago meet and you really notice how Drago still lives in the past. You really do feel the world has moved on and this is Rocky for the new generation. Having all these characters from the old movies does create that perspective. Drago's wife from Rocky 4 didn't age so well though yikes. :p Also points for the relationship between Adonis Creed and Bianca in the movie which was touching without being sentimental.

Door Lock

Kind of predictable plot about a girl being stalked by this homicidal creeper but it still keeps the tension and this being a Korean movie the context and cultural influences are a bit different. Apparently every door lock in Seoul is a numerical keypad as much of the most exciting scenes revolve around key codes. I have to admit as with many foreign movies I often end up enjoying the particular 'mood' of cultural influence more than the actual main plot but still, it helps Korean movies tend to have good pacing.

Natemans:
I don't know, I found Requiem unpleasant to sit through and couldn't get past the godawful cinematography.

Wait, you saw the cinematography? When I watched it, all I got was 94 minutes of vantablack level darkness on my screen.

Possum
There are some films that come along where a mere glance at the title and poster/cover presenting itself drenched with the unmistakable aura of metaphors oozing out of every orifice unsubtly encourages you to go in not interpreting everything you see literally, and this is most certainly that. A feature film debut from Matthew Holness; the main creative force behind Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, starring Sean Harris (that bad guy from mission impossible: rogue nation/fallout), this is more of a mood piece than any conventional horror. It just so happens the mood is that of a desolate nightmare which neither you nor the main character can escape. It's oppressive, isolating, filthy, dark, disturbing in a specific low-key creepy manner that never relents, and the performance of Harris is one of admirable purity in how he completely embodies someone who is trapped and raised in constant surreal inner torment where disgust, fear, paranoia, misery and repression has become their whole existence. He is not intended to be a typical relatable protag and part of the film's allure is finding out what the hell is going on with this guy and how much should we really trust our empathy for his perpetual waking nightmare (also, dude... were you seriously entertaining children with that??). It appears to be shot somewhere around northern England, but it all looks barren, decrepit and post-apocalyptic with a soundtrack to heighten all those unpleasantries in a way that films like Kill List and The Witch excelled in, but with a mild hint of Tetsuo's industrial influence for good measure. Human speak is minimal too.

I think it could have easily afforded to include far more disturbing moments than what was there though. They could've gone ovaries out around the last 30 mins and it be no lesser for it, perhaps becoming more memorable for those looking for outright horror shocks. But the commitment to a consistent low-key chronically depressed dread is perhaps more respectable in carving out its own identity, at the cost of reaching to a wider audience.

This is 100% a niche film and most people looking for a clear, conventional movie narrative, or anything with a hint of joy should probably steer clear. Also it's not the best film to watch just before going to bed. It really does feel like a lingering bad dream or eerily almost-grounded hallucinatory comedown which tends to make the sleepsies far less welcoming, so about 10 minutes of anything else afterwards is a recommended brain-palette cleanser.

One thing's for sure after watching, however: the people behind this absolutely must be the only choice for helming any future Silent Hill film adaptation. If this wasn't so niche, a petition to get that on the table would totally be what I'd encourage someone better at starting petitions to do. In some ways, it has a live-action salad fingers vibe too, which sounds ridiculous, but the mental comparison surfaced early on and never left at any point, perhaps only encouraged by later scenes.

Spiderman: Into The Spiderverse

Interesting one. I like to complain about superhero movies being too homogenized, both in style and in narrative, and Spiderman specifically is a character who's been rather overexposed fo the last to decades. A new Spiderman movie would have to justify its own existence by being very different from the past few and, if nothing else, Spiderverse is. Into the Spiderverse is the origin story of Miles Morales, rather than Peter Parker, as Spiderman and in making the star of the movie a black-hispanic teenager from Brooklyn it takes the opportunity to offer a funky, urban and very, very postmodernist take on a Spiderman origin story that has a sense of energy to it that did very much impress me. The directin is unlike anything I've seen before, looking a few miniskirts short of what I imagine Michael Bay's daydreams look like. All fast paced, eye-poppingly colourful and slick as oil, complemented by a funky soundtrack. Spiderverse is a feast for the senses, which I can respect, but I think it's to a point where the writing can't quite keep up with it. They sure try do throw in everything but the kitchen sink when it comes to Spiderman as a franchise with about half a dozen different Spiderpeople, a good number of more or less recognizable villains who all act as henchmen to main antagonist Kingpin and a bunch of injokes only people actually familiar with the comics would recognize. In other words, not me.

I can't say I didn't enjoy the movie, because I certainly did, it had almost Fury Road levels of unstoppable momentum, but because of its maximalist nature and its snappy pace some plotpoints felt underdeveloped and some emotional moments weren't quite as effective for me as they could have been. What the movie needed more of was downtime, room to build characters and make the audience care. And it's unfortunate, because the characters aren't bad, while some of the alternate Spiderpeople feel somewhat like one note jokes (For the record: We have Miles, deadbeat Peter Parker, sexy female Spider-Woman Gwen, pulp detective parody Spider-Man Noire, mech-piloting anime girl Penny Parker and cartoon character Spider-Ham) they're all likeable and quirky and could have had more actual character interaction. Same goes for the villains and to an extent even Mile's direct supporting cast. Those characters are fun. They could have done more with them that's not just action.

All things considered Into The Spiderverse is a great, slick as hell action movie with some good humor and some fun characters. I didn't feel it quite managed to capture the moments of emotional gravitas that the Raimi movies and, hell, to an extent even Homecoming had, but I think it makes more than up for it with pure inventiveness and hyperactive energy. All in all it's, artistically, probably one of the best superhero movies of the last five years and, you know what? I wouldn't mind seeing more of Miles Morales. It gets my seal of approval.

Captain Marvel (6/10)

Something something Brie Larson, something something feminism, something something controversy.

Right, now that that's sorted out, let's look at the actual movie.

Captain Marvel is kinda weird when you get down to it, in that the movie's strengths and weaknesses are kind of inverted from what you'd expect a film of this genre to have. Like, on one hand, the action scenes in this movie are really, really bad. They either suffer from shakey cam, choppy editing, poor pacing, or some combination of these things. About the only exception to this is the first fight where Carol (or "Veers," as she's called initially) is sparring with her mentor, where the martial arts is low key and, ahem, down to earth. But it's worth mentioning that this section and what follows is basically an info-dump, where proper nouns are given out willy nilly, and we fall into "as you know" territory. Carol faces him again at the end, and it's done in a way that subverts cliche, yet it feels like the cliche would work better. I get that Carol's basically gone super saiyan at this point, and that no-one can challenge her, but does that make for good writing? Even in Man of Steel, while Supes is OP as hell, he at least got to face Zod who balanced it out by also being OP.

On the other hand, this movie does have some depth to it, in as much that it has something to say on the nature of war, and how one percieves enemies. Not exactly deep, but there's a twist to the kree-skrull conflict, and it's a twist that recontextualizes the movie's first twist, that, shocker, Veers is human rather than kree. How convenient it is that the kree look exactly like humans except when they have blue skin. Like, is that a natural kree skin colour? Where did they evolve blue skin in addition to white and black? Do kree have ethnicities? Why do the kree follow an AI? Why does the AI decide to change its appearance based on the...eh, fuck it. Thinking too much about this.

Captain Marvel is a film where not only does the protagonist never get the name "Captain Marvel," but where the scale of quality resembles a bell curve. Starts off meh, gets better, then loses some oomph towards the end. This is in part due to a rushed ending, which basically goes:

Carol: I'm going to do A.

Carol: I'm going to do B.

Me: Weren't you saying you were going to do A originally? Are you still going to do A? Can you do both A and B, because it seems that doing B will make it hard to do A.

In other words, there's no reason why she doesn't come back to Earth bar inference, even though she says she's coming back to Earth (and never does till Infinity War). I have a feeling that something went down in script rewrites and wasn't ironed out.

As far as acting/characters go, Carol is fine. Brie Larson is fine. I've seen some people state that the style of humour is trying to mimic Robert Downey Jr.'s, but that's not quite the case. Carol's humour is more dry wit/deadpan humour, compared to Stark's more eclectic tongue. But even so, I found that the characters around her were more interesting. Nick Fury is fun. Yogg-Ronn is reasonably complex. The villain is one of the MCU's better ones, in as much that he has understandable motivations and layers are revealed over time. But what steals the show is Goose. Goose is awesome. Gimme more Goose.

Not much else to say. The 90s references are there, but even as a 90s kid, I was "meh" on the whole thing. It's neither patronising nor satisfying nostalgia, it's just there, whether it be Blockbuster, VHS, or dial-up Internet. Oh, and as someone who's griped that the MCU is pretty inpenetrable for everyone who wants to stick to just one franchise (e.g. you can't watch Iron Man 3 without watching Avengers, and you can't watch Avengers without watching everything that came before it), this movie is refreshingly stand alone. I mean, there's easter eggs, sure, especially one that explains the origin of the "Avengers" name in a pretty nice touch (though doesn't the name "SHIELD" only come into vogue in IM1? Why's it being used here?), but they never detract from the movie. In fact, the after-credits scene aside, I honestly think this works better as a first installment in the MCU rather than a penultimate one. You could watch this, go to IM1, and probably have a better experience than watching this right before End Game (like if you were doing a marathon or something).

So, Captain Marvel is fine. It's average. It's typical MCU fare. Maybe you can look at it supposed cultural relevance with a female lead, but we've had female led superhero films before, and in the case of Wonder Woman, better ones. You can easily give this film a feminist reading by interpreting a few select lines, but honestly, you'd have to squint pretty hard. Me though, I'm kind left to think that this is kind of an inverse Superman, where instead of a kryptonian on Earth thinking he's human, we have a human on Hela thinking she's kree. By the end of the day, both heroes smash starships and are the most powerful hero around. Go figure.

So, at the end of the day, the film is fine. Go figure.

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 . . . 27 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here