Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 NEXT
 

So, saw Solo. A pretty average movie. There is this wide eye optimism that Han has that doesn't really gel with the fact that he can do 4D chess and predict everyone's moves. Han has never been this smart either. He's usually just a bumbling idiot, running around like his heads been cut off. And can shoot first. Also, man are they plugging the "Han's really a good guy" motif. Don't care.

I took in the controversy, as much as I could without watching the movie first. I also don't think that Star Wars needs to copy and paste itself like TFA and TLJ. So, Solo doing its own thing was a breath of fresh air, similar to Rogue One. Problem is, its also like Rogue One and has shade of grey, instead of stark contrast of black and white like the originals and sequels. I think that, but I've seen way too many people react negatively to this. Star Wars, apparently, cant enter more developing morality, as per fans decree.

After all the complaining, I thought this was going to be a disaster. But its fine. 5.5/10

PsychedelicDiamond:

CoCage:

PsychedelicDiamond:
Also Alita: Battle Angel

I feel like I should have been the easiest mark ever for this. A cyberpunk action movie based on a manga with implicit themes of class struggle, starring a hot robot chick? You'd think it was made for me. But it just didn't connect and that frustrates me.

Alita, for example should be a likeable protagonist. The movie certainly tries it's hardest to make her one, spending the entire first quarter of the movie running through town with childlike wonderment in her digitally enhanced doe eyes and saving a small dog in the very beginning in what I have to assume was James Cameron remembering a book on screenwriting he once read. But somehow her personality never grows beyond being some sort of very violent Disney Princess.

You can clearly tell that this movie is based on a fairly long running manga and that whoever made it cared a whole lot about it but what that means is that it sure likes to elaborate on its own backstory. A lot of the first half is Alita, who has no memory of her past, having things explained to her by either her father figure or her love interest which means that much of the dialogue might as well be dramatic readings of various wiki articles.

The actual plot is a pretty erratic affair. First Alita is an assistant to her doctor/scientist/bounty hunter father, then she becomes a bounty hunter herself, then she becomes an athlete, for some reason... it all feels like an abridged version of a much longer story, that was presumably told in the manga.

I got the feeling that visually, the movie isn't gonna age very well. It's fine artistically, all the androids have pretty memorable designs and what we see of its world looks good. Most of it set in a dystopian city named Iron City that looks somewhat like Havana, if they restored capitalism. The actual effects though, while certainly state of the art now, are gonna date the movie for sure. Even now I felt that large parts of it looked like a video game. Chances are, it's not gonna hold up.

One of the things that really worked about the movie, a but surprisingly, because there aren't many, is the relationship between Alita and her father figure, who's played by Christoph Waltz. Rhere's a genuine humanity and believability to their interactions which seems entirely absent from all other character interactions. Especially the romance was something that didn't work for me at all.

Overall I'm sure there's an audience for this but I'm quite complacent not being part of it. I really wanted to like the movie, I sat in the theater thinking that I should be enjoying myself, but I wasn't. I felt it missed more often than it hit.

This video explains why people and the audience love the movie so much.

I get some of your criticisms, but I though the film was awesome overall ans was not afraid to shy away or be embarrassed about its source material, unlike other American adaptions of manga/anime. Nor adaptions of certain Western comics from the past that either tried to downplay/doing in the wizard, because Hollywood thought the ideas either being too "weird or strange".

That's where I don't really agree. Alita had some pretty inventive visual ideas, mostly character design and the look of its world, but otherwise I don't think it's too different from the young adult "plucky teenage heroine fights an oppressive system in the dystopian future" fare we've seen a lot of in the wake of Hunger Games. And I am aware, of course, that the source material predates those movies and the novels they're based on, but as a movie it doesn't do much to set itself apart from them, I feel. Aside from, spoiler, killing off the love interest, I guess.

Maybe I'm too harsh on the movie, it was mostly competently executed and if you'd ask me I'd much rather have people see a predictable but overall decent movie about class struggle and teenage rebellion in a Cyberpunk world directed by and starring a latinx person than the newest iteration of conveyor belt Marvel Disney US Military wank. Overall I want the movie to be popular and I wouldn't mind a sequel but it didn't excite me the way it seemed to excite some people.

I understand your reasons, but I disagreed to some extent. as far as I seen Alita does enough to distinguish itself from the likes of hunger games, maze runner, and divergent. The problem with those three films is that two out of the three Look visually similar, and the action is just not that good. Especially for the first hunger games where it uses so much a shaky cam. Not to mention, the romance is not that good for Hunger Games, and feels like a bad soap opera. Before anyone point that out, I know that was the point, but it still doesn't do with that well.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and I look forward to the sequel too.

trunkage:
So, saw Solo. A pretty average movie. There is this wide eye optimism that Han has that doesn't really gel with the fact that he can do 4D chess and predict everyone's moves. Han has never been this smart either. He's usually just a bumbling idiot, running around like his heads been cut off. And can shoot first. Also, man are they plugging the "Han's really a good guy" motif. Don't care.

I took in the controversy, as much as I could without watching the movie first. I also don't think that Star Wars needs to copy and paste itself like TFA and TLJ. So, Solo doing its own thing was a breath of fresh air, similar to Rogue One. Problem is, its also like Rogue One and has shade of grey, instead of stark contrast of black and white like theI originals and sequels. I think that, but I've seen way too many people react negatively to this. Star Wars, apparently, cant enter more developing morality, as per fans decree.

After all the complaining, I thought this was going to be a disaster. But its fine. 5.5/10

I didn't mind the shades of grey, I just didn't find it terribly gripping. Even for a heist movie it felt somewhat lackluster. I honestly only remember bits and pieces of the last half hour because I got bored and started looking at the internet(I was watching on netflix). I've never been bored with a SW movie enough that I was only partly paying attention, even movies like TFA and TLJ, which I felt were fairly flawed.

So yeah, it was pretty much okay. No more, no less.

I didn't see Solo due to the film looking uninteresting and it having the prequel problem of why does this even need to exist. I know the answer, so don't bother. Most SW fans from what I've seen, don't have a problem with grey areas (KOTOR II), but how it's told is my major guess. Then again, you have some SW fans complain about the most mundane or minor stuff where you have stop and ask "why do you care that much?". It's either that or sometimes nearly everything.

Aquaman (some stars / all stars)

Meh. Inoffensive? It felt like a thin cut right off the top of every aspect of generic superhero movies, a bit of everything, but not much of anything. Entertaining enough, but ultimately forgettable. I pretty much knew what I was in for when they did the whole ham-fisted foreshadowing of his abilities when he was getting bullied at the aquarium and all the fish in the tank swam to his defense much to the amazement of his peers, yadda, yadda, yadda, saw it coming, etc., etc.

I, Tonya
really quite brilliant. didn't know of the people or events it was about till after watching, but was interested enough to look into what was occuring. Margot Robbie as Tonya Harding is exceptional and the ice skating scenes are exhilarating. it utilises moments of conflicting narrative to portray different accounts in interesting ways, similar to the also-reality-based film Wonderland about a porn star drug dealer massacre.
there's probably a lot to write involving praise that has already been written many times over, so am thinking of criticisms but coming up short here. during a glance over the actual story, there was mention of some critics thinking that the moments of domestic violence were presented without the expected gravity they've seen elsewhere in other film, supposedly sugar-coating a harsh reality. but I don't think that's applicable here. as it's clearly remembered/narrated by a Tonya who has not only found a peace with the wrongs from her life, but also a women who has long adjusted to cope with various forms of abuse since a young child and views it with a sort of flippant acceptance and relief it's in the past, which is not an unheard of method of adjusting to difficult lifestyles and troublesome experiences to say the least. hell, I got a sis who pretty much does that too.

Dallas Buyers Club
another true person story, not sure why am falling into this trend of reality now, it wasn't intentional. but have been looking to give Matthew McConaughey lead stuff more of a chance as he does some impressive on-screen faff when given the freedom to just go for it. is also information that I was not privy to beforehand, inspiring a humble look on the infowebs after. The story is of Ron Woodroof as someone diagnosed with AIDS in good old fashioned bigoted 80s south America, Texas, who ends up getting involved with experimental and FDA-unapproved treatments while also providing them to others who come to him looking for anything more effective than the incredibly limited legal options. I am unqualified in experience to judge on the film's trans female character representation, so can't comment on that, but the performance was impressive and felt grounded along with the rest of the movie. all in all, no regrets, no wasted time, though am a few years late to this by now.

slaughterhouse rulezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
to be frank, this is by far the worst of the Simon Pegg/Nick Frost output. I'd probably go as far as saying it's the worst of Pegg's vast catalogue too. it's not entirely terrible, there are some alright moments for sure. but the surprise joy was Michael Sheen's character who never failed to bring a smile with a curious camp vulnerability to his headmaster role. if it was all him, yeah ok that might be an improvement. the problem I think is the film wants to focus on the kids, but they put all the work into making the adults the interesting people instead. it's not that the young cast are bad, they're doing their best with a script that doesn't want to make them memorable. oh and the horror parts are toss, which maybe could be blamed on it wanting to be a comedy, but even with that caveat it's so bloody weak and cheap while failing to produce any laughs from it either, it'd be more at home in a dull B-movie you accidentally see a minute or two of when the cat steps on the TV remote and turns it to one of those god-awful freeview channels

Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls

The GF and I decided to watch all the Indiana Jones movies, in sequence, this week; last night, we finale'd with this one. Neither of us had seen it, but I warned her that it got a lot of flak, so not to expect much. But I gotta say, I actually liked it, at least as much as any of the previous films. Maybe it helped seeing it in the recent context of the well-established campy-ness of the previous three movies, but it did pretty much everything they did, Indy was just older this time around. I liked that they brought Karen Allen back to reprise her roll, nice touch, but I didn't much like Shia LeBeouf as Indy's kid. He reminds me of Keanu Reeves in that he's the same character no matter what role you put him in, in his case, a neurotic, newly post-pubescent kid constantly on the verge of a frustration-induced panic attack.

My question is why did this film catch so much hell? I know Indiana Jones has a rabid fanbase, but I don't see what this movie did (or didn't do) that was so offensive to them. What aspects of Indiana Jones in the previous three films weren't there this time? The Indy swagger, the turncoat romantic interest, the incredulous dodging of a hail of bullets followed by an unlikely escape, the fear-inducing bug/animal scene, even the requisite reclaiming of his iconic hat; it checked all of the boxes, except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

Xprimentyl:
Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls

except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

And that's what got a lot of the hardcore fans panties in a bunch. Oh, and Shia Lebouf (with the twist as his character being Indy's son), and the nuking the fridge scene. Sci-fi doesn't makes sense for them in terms of consistency, which is odd, because some of the Indiana Jones games used science fiction instead of the religious supernatural.

I enjoyed Crystal Skulls back then, and I still do now. The only real problem I had were some of the obvious CG where they could have used practical effects. Otherwise, I enjoyed them like all of the other movies.

CoCage:

Xprimentyl:
Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls

except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

I am convinced that man's hair style was done by aliens.

How To Train Your Dragon 3.

Eh. It was ok. The villain is treated as if he is scary, but the villain in 2 had a fucking Dragon God, this new guy is just a creepy hunter.

Also I get that its a kids movie but like, that movie could have been solved if they actually like, killed their enemies. 'We keep not killing them but somehow keep coming!'

Also fucking hell the previews. Some Christian propaganda BS, a sequel to that shitty Dog's Life movie, and some Angry Birds drivel.

Xprimentyl:
Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls

The GF and I decided to watch all the Indiana Jones movies, in sequence, this week; last night, we finale?d with this one. Neither of us had seen it, but I warned her that it got a lot of flak, so not to expect much. But I gotta say, I actually liked it, at least as much as any of the previous films. Maybe it helped seeing it in the recent context of the well-established campy-ness of the previous three movies, but it did pretty much everything they did, Indy was just older this time around. I liked that they brought Karen Allen back to reprise her roll, nice touch, but I didn?t much like Shia LeBeouf as Indy?s kid. He reminds me of Keanu Reeves in that he?s the same character no matter what role you put him in, in his case, a neurotic, newly post-pubescent kid constantly on the verge of a frustration-induced panic attack.

My question is why did this film catch so much hell? I know Indiana Jones has a rabid fanbase, but I don?t see what this movie did (or didn?t do) that was so offensive to them. What aspects of Indiana Jones in the previous three films weren?t there this time? The Indy swagger, the turncoat romantic interest, the incredulous dodging of a hail of bullets followed by an unlikely escape, the fear-inducing bug/animal scene, even the requisite reclaiming of his iconic hat; it checked all of the boxes, except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

Yeah, this was definitely a sequel to Indiana Jones. I personally don't like Shia and the fridge was too over the top. But aliens? Yeah we had the avenging ghost things in one, apocalypto in two and health potion in three. Aliens is not a stretch. I guess some people are pro God but anti alien immigrant.

But then I keep saying old Ghostbusters and Star Wars weren't that good either. What do I know.

Aquaman

It was the best movie in the DCCU since Batman v Superman but... well... you know. There's not much in the way of competition, is there? While I still think the franchise more or less died when Zack Snyder left, Aquaman was serviceable. It was fun. I didn't have a bad time watching it. An attempt was made. As a matter of fact, I think that's what it boils down to. An attempt was made. Director James Wan obviously tried to honor Zack Snyder's vision for the franchise as something grandiose and epic and kinda artistic while also finding a compromise with the people who were claiming it needed to be lighter and more colourful. That compromise is, in essence, taking Snyder's operatic, gothic style with visual sensibilities inspired by classical painting and pivoting into something that resembles the cover art for a 70s prog album. Aquaman is a very, very tacky looking movie but I somewhat respect it for how confidently it commits to that visual style. Atlantis is a garish wonderland of CGI that looks so phony that it made me wonder if maybe I should have given Alita a bit more credit.

Plot and writing are mostly not terrible. It obviously goes for a King Arthur style story, which you can tell because it has a lot of very blunt references to it, but it ends up with what's pretty much a slightly better directed and slighty worse written version of Black Panther. Jason Momoa plays a likeable enough hero, not a bad variation of the "superhero you feel like you could have a beer with" archetype that I find a bit overdone but not to the point of not being able to appreciate it. His love interest is Amber Heard as an Atlantean princess who looks a bit like she dyes her hair with a red text marker and, honestly, isn't very likeable. As a matter of fact she comes off as a bit of a stuck up bitch all the way throughout. We have Patrick Wilson as the villain, a somwhat imperialistic Atlantean King, and Willem DeFoe and Nicole Kidman in supporting roles who all get the job done.

The action is pretty good, actually, at least in the scenes where it's not just a CGI cartoon. It's nicely choreographed, easy to keep track of and has moments of creativity. Director James Wan also directed The Fast and the Furious 7, which I'd call my favourite Fast and Furious movie if I wasn't embarassed to admit that I have such a thing as a favourite Fast and Furious movie. The guy knows how to satisfyingly execute an action movie and he reliably did.

It's not like I'm seriously hoping for Zack Snyder and Chris Terrio to return and give us the great, genre defining superhero epic we all deserve, not after they got, like 24% on Rotten Tomatoes the last time they tried, and surely Aquaman is a major step up from garbage like Suicide Squad and Justice League or even the barely decent Wonder Woman, but... you know, I've seen Black Panther already and while it wasn't all that good either, at least it had a better villain and Shuri, who's best MCU waifu. Aquaman is okay. I wasn't frustrated that I've had to see it like I was after Suicide Squad or Justice League but I'm not gonna recommend it on that virtue alone.

Also, what was it with that lame ass Hip Hop version of Africa that they played at one point? Why not just play Africa instead?

Poughkeepsie Tapes.

Look, a bit disappointed. It's not really a horror movie, more in the vain of Silence of the Lambs triller crossed with a documentary. 7/10. Too much hype for not mucu

Alright, spoilers. Only warning

The officer who wrongly executed just didn't make sense. Executions usually take decades I thought. I took me out of the experience. There wasnt much of any torture; this was definitely tell, not show. I think it made it ineffective. But the last scene of Cheryl was actually sickening. You knew what was going to happen and it paid off.

Xprimentyl:
Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal SkullsMy question is why did this film catch so much hell? I know Indiana Jones has a rabid fanbase, but I don?t see what this movie did (or didn?t do) that was so offensive to them. What aspects of Indiana Jones in the previous three films weren?t there this time? The Indy swagger, the turncoat romantic interest, the incredulous dodging of a hail of bullets followed by an unlikely escape, the fear-inducing bug/animal scene, even the requisite reclaiming of his iconic hat; it checked all of the boxes, except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

You take that movie and replace the aliens with some mystical item and it would've still been terrible. Though the alien angle certainly didn't help matters.

I'd say the overall problem was that most of the people involved are old now and lack the spunk they used to have when making these movies. Afterall, Spielberg hasn't really been that great in the last 10+ years. That coupled with a lack of the 80's 'who gives a fuck about scarring the kids' mentallity, throw in some pointless characters, like Mac and Ox, some really bad CGI, and you have yourself a really flaccid picture.

Casual Shinji:

Xprimentyl:
Indian Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal SkullsMy question is why did this film catch so much hell? I know Indiana Jones has a rabid fanbase, but I don?t see what this movie did (or didn?t do) that was so offensive to them. What aspects of Indiana Jones in the previous three films weren?t there this time? The Indy swagger, the turncoat romantic interest, the incredulous dodging of a hail of bullets followed by an unlikely escape, the fear-inducing bug/animal scene, even the requisite reclaiming of his iconic hat; it checked all of the boxes, except this time instead of gods, it was aliens.

You take that movie and replace the aliens with some mystical item and it would've still been terrible. Though the alien angle certainly didn't help matters.

I'd say the overall problem was that most of the people involved are old now and lack the spunk they used to have when making these movies. Afterall, Spielberg hasn't really been that great in the last 10+ years. That coupled with a lack of the 80's 'who gives a fuck about scarring the kids' mentallity, throw in some pointless characters, like Mac and Ox, some really bad CGI, and you have yourself a really flaccid picture.

Lets see if there is weight to the claim that Speilberg has not been good for the last 10+ years. Lets start dividing line with Saving Private Ryan as his last good movie imo.

1.A.I. Artificial Intelligence: Have not seen this movie, but Nostalgia Critic was not fond of it, on the otherhand this movie was meant to Honor Stanley Kubrick since this was a movie he was gonna make, but he died so Spielberg took up the mantle to finish it.

2. The Minority Report: I have no feelings for this movie, and I don't know whats the popular opinion on whether its good or bad.

3. Catch Me If You Can: I remember watching this movie in theaters as a kid. It was a downer kind of movie, but became uplifting in the end.

4. The Terminal: Never seen it.

5. War of the Worlds: I actually liked this movie and it horrified me as a kid.

6. Munich: This is considered his most controversial film of his entire career right? Something to do with comparing the events that happened here to the 9/11 Terror attacks?

7. Indiana Jones Crystal Skull: I saw this in theaters. I knew some stuff felt dumb, but I didn't think it was the worse thing since cancer.

8. Adventures of Tintin. Never saw it.

9. War Horse, PG-13 Saving Private Ryan in World War 1. Weird tonal clashes between sappy animal loving schlop and grimdark war.

10. Lincoln, decent movie, but I feel it could have done more with the American Civil War and Lincoln's involvement in it. Too much focused on passing the 16th Amendment which I am pretty sure was important, but I feel there was more to the Civil War then that.

11. The Bridge of Spies: I keep trying to watch it, but I just can't into it for some reason. I think they could have gone for a more R rating in some tone or fashion. Or mabye there could have been a better topic to make a Cold War era movie out of then this.

12. The BFG: Never seen it, but I feel its an OK movie despite the criticisms I saw leveled against it.

13. The Post: Of all the more serious drama movies Spielberg made, this one sounds like the most boring.

14. Ready Player One: Saw it. It was cool in some places but it ain't my favorite movie.

CoCage:

And that's what got a lot of the hardcore fans panties in a bunch. Oh, and Shia Lebouf (with the twist as his character being Indy's son), and the nuking the fridge scene. Sci-fi doesn't makes sense for them in terms of consistency, which is odd, because some of the Indiana Jones games used science fiction instead of the religious supernatural.

I enjoyed Crystal Skulls back then, and I still do now. The only real problem I had were some of the obvious CG where they could have used practical effects. Otherwise, I enjoyed them like all of the other movies.

trunkage:
Yeah, this was definitely a sequel to Indiana Jones. I personally don't like Shia and the fridge was too over the top. But aliens? Yeah we had the avenging ghost things in one, apocalypto in two and health potion in three. Aliens is not a stretch. I guess some people are pro God but anti alien immigrant.

Oh, THAT'S the infamous refrigerator scene that had the internet all pissy a decade ago?!? I had no idea! But c'mon, Indiana Jones is nothing if not outlandish and incredulous. "Realistically," he should have been dead no fewer than a dozen times by now; why choose THAT moment to get all chuffed and call shenanigans?

Casual Shinji:

I'd say the overall problem was that most of the people involved are old now and lack the spunk they used to have when making these movies. Afterall, Spielberg hasn't really been that great in the last 10+ years. That coupled with a lack of the 80's 'who gives a fuck about scarring the kids' mentallity, throw in some pointless characters, like Mac and Ox, some really bad CGI, and you have yourself a really flaccid picture.

Yeah, Harrison Ford was probably a bit long in the tooth, but ultimately, I think the film was a good Indy film. Also, I agree; I couldn't really put my finger on it, but this movie did lack a little of the edge the previous films did; we were shocked to see the early films were only rated PG with all the blood and guts!

Samtemdo8:

Lets see if there is weight to the claim that Speilberg has not been good for the last 10+ years.

Spoilers, there isn't.

2. The Minority Report:

Excellent movie.

3. Catch Me If You Can:

Very solid movie.

4. The Terminal:

Good, if not great movie.

5. War of the Worlds:

Stellar first two acts let down by a lacklustre third act. But all in all, good movie.

8. Adventures of Tintin. Never saw it.

Fun adventure movie that I enjoy more than any Indiana Jones movie that I've seen.

9. War Horse,

Read the book, saw the stage play, never saw the film.

11. The Bridge of Spies:

Absolutely excellent movie.

12. The BFG:

The only outright bad Spielberg film that I've seen.

13. The Post:

Very solid movie.

14. Ready Player One:

Enjoyable movie. It loses the best elements of the book, but thankfully cuts out the worst ones. Breezy fun.

trunkage:
So, Solo doing its own thing was a breath of fresh air, similar to Rogue One. Problem is, its also like Rogue One and has shade of grey, instead of stark contrast of black and white like the originals and sequels. I think that, but I've seen way too many people react negatively to this. Star Wars, apparently, cant enter more developing morality, as per fans decree.

I really have to raise an eyebrow as to the notion of Solo or Rogue One having shades of grey.

Rogue One has Cassian killing an informant and...what else, exactly? It neatly falls into "Empire bad, rebels good." Just because the rebels are a bit dirtier than usual doesn't change them being the good guys (is it just me, or do Rogue One and Solo really feel grungy)?

Solo has even less ambiguity. It's a heist movie. Heist movies are fun. We have a criminal working for another criminal, stealing from more criminals, giving the goods to a fourth criminal. That doesn't really make the film in of itself morally ambiguous.

Not a movie but I watched the anthology series Love Death and Robots and it was pretty damn excellent.

There were obviously some thuds and some ones that didn't quite achieve excellence but some were damn good and left me shook.

Hawki:

Samtemdo8:

Lets see if there is weight to the claim that Speilberg has not been good for the last 10+ years.

Spoilers, there isn't.

2. The Minority Report:

Excellent movie.

3. Catch Me If You Can:

Very solid movie.

4. The Terminal:

Good, if not great movie.

5. War of the Worlds:

Stellar first two acts let down by a lacklustre third act. But all in all, good movie.

8. Adventures of Tintin. Never saw it.

Fun adventure movie that I enjoy more than any Indiana Jones movie that I've seen.

9. War Horse,

Read the book, saw the stage play, never saw the film.

11. The Bridge of Spies:

Absolutely excellent movie.

12. The BFG:

The only outright bad Spielberg film that I've seen.

13. The Post:

Very solid movie.

14. Ready Player One:

Enjoyable movie. It loses the best elements of the book, but thankfully cuts out the worst ones. Breezy fun.

You are missing Lincoln and AI

Samtemdo8:

You are missing Lincoln and AI

With the exception of War Horse, I was only commenting on movies I'd seen.

Captain Marvel.

I enjoyed it. It wasn't one of the top tier Marvel films but it kept my interest well so it's far from the worst. Solidly in the middle of the pack. Kinda fun all around even if the big twist is kinda easy to spot(If you've seen Guardians of the Galaxy, anyway). Speaking of which, I did get a chuckle from seeing the one dude from Guardians show up in this one. I don't know his name, but he's the black dude who confronts Peter at the beginning of the movie.
"My name is...Star Lord!"
"WHO???"
"Star Lord. Legendary Outlaw....?"

Anyway, It does raise a few interesting questions. Namely:

-So I seem to remember in the first Iron Man movie Agent Coulson showed up a few times and talked to Tony about joining SHIELD, but he used it's full, hard to remember actual name and there was a comment about "That's a mouthful" "Yeah, we're working on that". Except here they're using the acrynom pretty much from the get go. Did Coulson forget it around the time of Iron Man or something? I realize it's a minor retcon but still it's a little wierd.

-More notably, So they've established that SHIELD is aware that Alien Shapeshifters exist as far back as the 1990's and can infiltrate anywhere and pretend to be anyone or anything. One would think this would lead to SHIELD adding a layer of Security Screening to perhaps, I don't know, check from possible infiltration from hostile agents. Because obviously we know from The Winter Soldier that SHIELD was infested with HYDRA agents up till around 2014 or so and now that looks really weird and negligent in retrospect. Either that or HYDRA was just incredibly good at fixing the security screenings in their favor.

-

Hawki:

trunkage:
So, Solo doing its own thing was a breath of fresh air, similar to Rogue One. Problem is, its also like Rogue One and has shade of grey, instead of stark contrast of black and white like the originals and sequels. I think that, but I've seen way too many people react negatively to this. Star Wars, apparently, cant enter more developing morality, as per fans decree.

I really have to raise an eyebrow as to the notion of Solo or Rogue One having shades of grey.

Rogue One has Cassian killing an informant and...what else, exactly? It neatly falls into "Empire bad, rebels good." Just because the rebels are a bit dirtier than usual doesn't change them being the good guys (is it just me, or do Rogue One and Solo really feel grungy)?

Solo has even less ambiguity. It's a heist movie. Heist movies are fun. We have a criminal working for another criminal, stealing from more criminals, giving the goods to a fourth criminal. That doesn't really make the film in of itself morally ambiguous.

In Rogue One, they are painted as terrorists and use terrorists. They are also completely unified, with a bunch of different factions vying for control and the final mission being a complete mess from infighting. They lost far more people than necessary becuase everyone didn't want to communicate.

Solo... They're criminals. But Han is good. That's all.

Maybe I should emphasise that it's morally grey compared to the mainline movie. I wouldn't say it's good morally grey. It's just better than normal Star Wars, which requires no literal thought by the viewer.

Dalisclock:
-So I seem to remember in the first Iron Man movie Agent Coulson showed up a few times and talked to Tony about joining SHIELD, but he used it's full, hard to remember actual name and there was a comment about "That's a mouthful" "Yeah, we're working on that". Except here they're using the acrynom pretty much from the get go. Did Coulson forget it around the time of Iron Man or something? I realize it's a minor retcon but still it's a little wierd.

Oh thats been weird for many films now. Sounds like they're just starting up as an organisation in Iron Man...then later films reveal they've been going since about the end of WWII and have had a massive headquarters in Washington DC since at least the 80s. You'd think Pepper would be more like "Oh yeah, SHIELD, of course, everyone's heard of you guys"

Dalisclock:
-More notably, So they've established that SHIELD is aware that Alien Shapeshifters exist as far back as the 1990's and can infiltrate anywhere and pretend to be anyone or anything. One would think this would lead to SHIELD adding a layer of Security Screening to perhaps, I don't know, check from possible infiltration from hostile agents. Because obviously we know from The Winter Soldier that SHIELD was infested with HYDRA agents up till around 2014 or so and now that looks really weird and negligent in retrospect. Either that or HYDRA was just incredibly good at fixing the security screenings in their favor.

I mean, HYDRA have had 50 years to be infiltrating SHIELD by this point, entirely possible they're rigging screenings in their favour by now. Maybe keep it to just checking if you're human or not

Dalisclock:

I had wondered about this one. We see later Carol has blue blood despite arguably being human, so maybe there's some temporary transfusion thing going on. Or maybe Lawson just forged any documents she needed. "Yep, totally passed my medical, here's the pass. Also, would you like to see a birth certificate, I made five. I mean have five!"

Hawki:

Samtemdo8:

Lets see if there is weight to the claim that Speilberg has not been good for the last 10+ years.

Spoilers, there isn't.

If you hadn't mentioned most of these movies I wouldn't even have remembered that they existed. The only Spielberg movie since Saving Private Ryan that had any sort of proper Spielberg quality was War of the Worlds, and that movie shits itself so hard in the third act that it destroys the whole movie.

And I never said Spielberg wasn't good anymore, but that he lacks the moviemaking muscle he used to have. Ever since his little Kubrick fase that magic is just kinda gone.

The Wife
it is rather superb, I suppose. almost flawless. about a women who has lived a long life through her writing only being published as her husband's work due to difficulties around women authors managing to be taken seriously. husband, wife and son go on trip for Nobel prize collection on said work and drama through heartfelt, believable acting occurs.

Now...there is one thing that bothered me however. Not the choice at the end, not anything particularly important to the story either. It's Glenn Close's character uttering the words "I could care less." A regular mild bother we Brits endure from our democratically compromised cousins that is usually brushed off nowadays with begrudging acceptance. But in this case, you're a bloody genius writer ffs! what you doing??

Here, don't let me confuse you, it's old, but... have a fresh-faced, supple David Mitchell explain this more appropriately;

Dalisclock:

-More notably, So they've established that SHIELD is aware that Alien Shapeshifters exist as far back as the 1990's and can infiltrate anywhere and pretend to be anyone or anything. One would think this would lead to SHIELD adding a layer of Security Screening to perhaps, I don't know, check from possible infiltration from hostile agents. Because obviously we know from The Winter Soldier that SHIELD was infested with HYDRA agents up till around 2014 or so and now that looks really weird and negligent in retrospect. Either that or HYDRA was just incredibly good at fixing the security screenings in their favor.

Wasn't the thing about Skrull shapeshifting is that it's so...perfect it can't be picked up by tests? I may be mixing it up with their comics versions. Though I remember their weakness being that they only gained their copy's short term memories so asking them anything that happened more than a few weeks ago would stumble them.

Regardless, Hydra was part of Shield since day 1 so yeah they most certainly rigged it in their favor. (not that a blood test can check for nazi sympathy anyways)

Neurotic Void Melody:
Now...there is one thing that bothered me however. Not the choice at the end, not anything particularly important to the story either. It's Glenn Close's character uttering the words "I could care less." A regular mild bother we Brits endure from our democratically compromised cousins that is usually brushed off nowadays with begrudging acceptance. But in this case, you're a bloody genius writer ffs! what you doing??

Here, don't let me confuse you, it's old, but... have a fresh-faced, supple David Mitchell explain this more appropriately;

Wait, that's an American thing? Pretty sure that's just a thing for any English speaker who's more concerned with getting words out of their mouth than what those words actually mean in the intended context. (Actually, that DOES sound pretty American...) Either way, it drives me insane. My friend's famous for it; she also says "perbatim," instead of "verbatim," "phantom" instead of "fathom," "a whole nother" instead of "a whole other" and "in a trans" instead of "in a trance." I've corrected her enough times that I think now she just says those things to aggravate the tumor growing on my temporal lobe. Please let the Queen know I'm prepared to surrender her to British authorities for a fair bounty.

Us.
I enjoyed the movie, in many ways it's less heavy-handed than Get Out but also a bit more shapeless in that very comfy insert-metaphor-here way of pleasing the crowd. Good directing and filmmaking. Peele's overhyped as a writer, he's Twilight Zone good but not that good. Americans are so starved for intelligent screenwriting they'll take simple set-ups and pay-offs for genius. The middle drags on with your unstoppable-stalker cliches but solid beginning and ending. Left the theater satisfied.

undeadsuitor:

Dalisclock:

-More notably, So they've established that SHIELD is aware that Alien Shapeshifters exist as far back as the 1990's and can infiltrate anywhere and pretend to be anyone or anything. One would think this would lead to SHIELD adding a layer of Security Screening to perhaps, I don't know, check from possible infiltration from hostile agents. Because obviously we know from The Winter Soldier that SHIELD was infested with HYDRA agents up till around 2014 or so and now that looks really weird and negligent in retrospect. Either that or HYDRA was just incredibly good at fixing the security screenings in their favor.

Wasn't the thing about Skrull shapeshifting is that it's so...perfect it can't be picked up by tests? I may be mixing it up with their comics versions. Though I remember their weakness being that they only gained their copy's short term memories so asking them anything that happened more than a few weeks ago would stumble them.

Regardless, Hydra was part of Shield since day 1 so yeah they most certainly rigged it in their favor. (not that a blood test can check for nazi sympathy anyways)

Right now I'm getting this amusing scene playing out in my head.

SHIELD Security Screener: So we did all the tests and we've confirmed you're not an alien reptilian shapeshifter.
SHIELD Agent: Indeed! I'm totally not HYDRA.
SSS:[Beat] I didn't say anything about HYDRA. Why would you say that?
SA: Because I'm not, of course. And also 100% pure human. Any other questions?
SSS: You may go now.

Xprimentyl:
Wait, that's an American thing? Pretty sure that's just a thing for any English speaker who's more concerned with getting words out of their mouth than what those words actually mean in the intended context. (Actually, that DOES sound pretty American...) Either way, it drives me insane. My friend's famous for it; she also says "perbatim," instead of "verbatim," "phantom" instead of "fathom," "a whole nother" instead of "a whole other" and "in a trans" instead of "in a trance." I've corrected her enough times that I think now she just says those things to aggravate the tumor growing on my temporal lobe. Please let the Queen know I'm prepared to surrender her to British authorities for a fair bounty.

well, it might be said by other non-Americans also, but am confident in blaming America for influencing the "incorrect" way regardless. and even though one less syllable may logically seem an easier, shorter method, "couldn't care" feels more rhythmic and rolls off the tongue better, as opposed to "could care" which feels like getting snagged on something midway. have heard quite a few people from US use the correct term though, so it's definitely an odd one

is your friend a texican? we usually tend to cut texicans some slack when it comes to speech due to their...relaxed methodology. if however she does not have such an excuse, well we offer a high-rise London apartment most suited for tax avoidance, five officially endorsed indigenous swans and a basket of homegrown baby hedgehogs for every bounty. and seeing as you have been quite co-operative and have a probably lovely face, I'll put in a good word to queenie so you'll get the baby hedgehogs in advance as a token of good will :)

Neurotic Void Melody:

Xprimentyl:
Wait, that's an American thing? Pretty sure that's just a thing for any English speaker who's more concerned with getting words out of their mouth than what those words actually mean in the intended context. (Actually, that DOES sound pretty American...) Either way, it drives me insane. My friend's famous for it; she also says "perbatim," instead of "verbatim," "phantom" instead of "fathom," "a whole nother" instead of "a whole other" and "in a trans" instead of "in a trance." I've corrected her enough times that I think now she just says those things to aggravate the tumor growing on my temporal lobe. Please let the Queen know I'm prepared to surrender her to British authorities for a fair bounty.

well, it might be said by other non-Americans also, but am confident in blaming America for influencing the "incorrect" way regardless. and even though one less syllable may logically seem an easier, shorter method, "couldn't care" feels more rhythmic and rolls off the tongue better, as opposed to "could care" which feels like getting snagged on something midway. have heard quite a few people from US use the correct term though, so it's definitely an odd one

is your friend a texican? we usually tend to cut texicans some slack when it comes to speech due to their...relaxed methodology. if however she does not have such an excuse, well we offer a high-rise London apartment most suited for tax avoidance, five officially endorsed indigenous swans and a basket of homegrown baby hedgehogs for every bounty. and seeing as you have been quite co-operative and have a probably lovely face, I'll put in a good word to queenie so you'll get the baby hedgehogs in advance as a token of good will :)

Of it being America's fault, I'm certain. But a pandemic does not exonerate Patient Zero, so my apologies from the US of A; we don't so much speak English here as we do chew on it.

And my friend is from Oklahoma (aka: Texas' Hat;) about the only thing difference between the two states is their latitudinal and longitudinal coordinates and the slightly smaller egos in Oklahoma, but to hear them tell it, they're night and day. Hopefully that niggling details doesn't disqualify me from that sweet bounty? The high-rise was nice, but the hedgehogs sealed the deal.

Iron Monkey 8/10

Still excellent. Voice lines are mixed like crap sometimes and some of the undercranking (the speedup in combat scenes) is a bit weird, but the wuxia martial arts action is among the best of its kind.

Xprimentyl:
Of it being America?s fault, I?m certain. But a pandemic does not exonerate Patient Zero, so my apologies from the US of A; we don?t so much speak English here as we do chew on it.

Of it being America's fault, I'm certain. But a pandemic does not exonerate Patient Zero, so my apologies from the US of A; we don't so much speak English here as we do chew on it.

And my friend is from Oklahoma (aka: Texas' Hat;) about the only thing difference between the two states is their latitudinal and longitudinal coordinates and the slightly smaller egos in Oklahoma, but to hear them tell it, they're night and day. Hopefully that niggling details doesn't disqualify me from that sweet bounty? The high-rise was nice, but the hedgehogs sealed the deal.

Well, there's a lot to chew on, and the education system doesn't exactly put their best efforts into the art of mastication. If anyone should apologise, it's those making the decisions at the top who too often serve only themselves and the wealthy/business class they maintain an ugly yet lucrative symbiosis with. You're off the hook for now, citizen! Apology wil be returned in the mail with maybe a cute postcard of a local beach.

Ooh, Oklahoma is the humble hat of Texas then? Perhaps humble is the only natural response for any hat catering to a head so big. ;) Is it ok to call people living there 'Oklahomians'? Not sure what the usual term is, but I do hope it's that. Nevermind, technically your bounty is still legitimate, by a whisker of a nat's grandma's pet goat. Be wary of the hedgehogs, they start off small, but it isn't long before they're after your tea and biscuits. They can be pretty aggressive when it comes to being included in their owner's will too, don't let them pressure you into any inheritance, greedy little gold-digging bastards.

(Why do your posts change all the punctuation to question marks every time I quote here? It's rather strange, I just hurriedly copy-pasted the last one for a lazy get-around. Somebody somewhere must be responsible and executed for this oversight so my laziness can continue unnoticed)

Neurotic Void Melody:

Xprimentyl:
Of it being America?s fault, I?m certain. But a pandemic does not exonerate Patient Zero, so my apologies from the US of A; we don?t so much speak English here as we do chew on it.

Of it being America's fault, I'm certain. But a pandemic does not exonerate Patient Zero, so my apologies from the US of A; we don't so much speak English here as we do chew on it.

And my friend is from Oklahoma (aka: Texas' Hat;) about the only thing difference between the two states is their latitudinal and longitudinal coordinates and the slightly smaller egos in Oklahoma, but to hear them tell it, they're night and day. Hopefully that niggling details doesn't disqualify me from that sweet bounty? The high-rise was nice, but the hedgehogs sealed the deal.

Well, there's a lot to chew on, and the education system doesn't exactly put their best efforts into the art of mastication. If anyone should apologise, it's those making the decisions at the top who too often serve only themselves and the wealthy/business class they maintain an ugly yet lucrative symbiosis with. You're off the hook for now, citizen! Apology wil be returned in the mail with maybe a cute postcard of a local beach.

Ooh, Oklahoma is the humble hat of Texas then? Perhaps humble is the only natural response for any hat catering to a head so big. ;) Is it ok to call people living there 'Oklahomians'? Not sure what the usual term is, but I do hope it's that. Nevermind, technically your bounty is still legitimate, by a whisker of a nat's grandma's pet goat. Be wary of the hedgehogs, they start off small, but it isn't long before they're after your tea and biscuits. They can be pretty aggressive when it comes to being included in their owner's will too, don't let them pressure you into any inheritance, greedy little gold-digging bastards.

(Why do your posts change all the punctuation to question marks every time I quote here? It's rather strange, I just hurriedly copy-pasted the last one for a lazy get-around. Somebody somewhere must be responsible and executed for this oversight so my laziness can continue unnoticed)

I wouldn't call them humble; "Texas Hat" thing is usually said by Texans in a disparaging way and pisses them off. But you're no far off; the actual term is "Oklahomans" (casually "Okies.") And as the bounty is still legit, I'll be putting one, bound and gagged, in the post for your authorities. Or should this exchange take place in international waters? My lacking any official affiliation with law enforcement, I can see some calling this rightful extradition a "kidnapping."

And the punctuation thing has been happening when I try to quote people forever, a couple years at least; doesn't happen all the time but more often than not. A lot of people have mentioned it; you're just no seeing it?

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here