Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

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Thaluikhain:
Return of the Caped Crusaders.

Proper Adam West Batman, not angsty pretentious rubbish. He's a rich furry vigilante, he shouldn't try to be too serious.

His whole inception was him losing his parents. He was meant to be serious.

He only became goofy because of the 60s camp era where there was no sense of drama and grit in the 60s.

Thaluikhain:
The Warcraft movie was surprisingly good. Lot of waffle, and hard telling orcs apart, but held up quite well.

As a Warcraft fan it disappointed me with all of its lore breaking. And that because it failed in theaters, I won't see the sequels I want to see like Arthas the Lich King.

Chimpzy:
Doom: Annihilation - 0

Here's a touching story: this movie sucks. To no one's surprise. Discussion over. Watch Aliens again instead. Same movie. Except, you know, good. The end.

Worse then the one with Dwayne Johnson?

I saw the David Brent: Life on the Road mockumentary... I liked The Office just fine but I don't see the point of the movie. Feels like Gervais just wanted to play the character again and show off his singing voice. As far as the character's concerned, he reached the end of a perfect arc at the end of the show, and all the movie does is undo it so he can reach it again for the sam reason.

Samtemdo8:
And that because it failed in theaters, I won't see the sequels I want to see like Arthas the Lich King.

There's rumours that Activision Blizzard are starting their own streaming service akin to Netflix. Maybe there's hope for something Warcraft related (and from other IPs for that matter).

Just saw some nonsense called Batman Ninja. It's anime, so the whole plot consists of characters coolly one-upping each other at the last second to the shock of everyone looking and all the ladies have triple-D tits spilling out of their clothes.

Earlier saw Batman: Bad Blood, a forgettable Saturday morning cartoon stretched to feature-length.

Samtemdo8:

Chimpzy:
Doom: Annihilation - 0

Here's a touching story: this movie sucks. To no one's surprise. Discussion over. Watch Aliens again instead. Same movie. Except, you know, good. The end.

Worse then the one with Dwayne Johnson?

Oh yes. Dwayne Johnson is actually a better actor than anyone in this.

Samtemdo8:
His whole inception was him losing his parents. He was meant to be serious.

He only became goofy because of the 60s camp era where there was no sense of drama and grit in the 60s.

The premise of Batman is inherently absurd, IMHO it just doesn't work to try and take it seriously.

Samtemdo8:
As a Warcraft fan it disappointed me with all of its lore breaking. And that because it failed in theaters, I won't see the sequels I want to see like Arthas the Lich King.

I agree with that, but then it struck me part of the way through that they keep retconning it anyway. The lore changed quite a bit from Warcraft to Warcraft2.

Bit annoyed that the Draenei in the beginning of the movie didn't look like the weird alien monster people from Warcraft3, presumably so you'll be more sympathetic when they get killed.

Thaluikhain:

Samtemdo8:
His whole inception was him losing his parents. He was meant to be serious.

He only became goofy because of the 60s camp era where there was no sense of drama and grit in the 60s.

The premise of Batman is inherently absurd, IMHO it just doesn't work to try and take it seriously.

Samtemdo8:
As a Warcraft fan it disappointed me with all of its lore breaking. And that because it failed in theaters, I won't see the sequels I want to see like Arthas the Lich King.

I agree with that, but then it struck me part of the way through that they keep retconning it anyway. The lore changed quite a bit from Warcraft to Warcraft2.

Bit annoyed that the Draenei in the beginning of the movie didn't look like the weird alien monster people from Warcraft3, presumably so you'll be more sympathetic when they get killed.

Because this was before they devolved into weird alien monsters. Like the mutation began when Draenor was Outland I think.

Thaluikhain:

Samtemdo8:
His whole inception was him losing his parents. He was meant to be serious.

He only became goofy because of the 60s camp era where there was no sense of drama and grit in the 60s.

The premise of Batman is inherently absurd, IMHO it just doesn't work to try and take it seriously.

Yeah Batman works best, and possibly only really works at all, when you realise and accept that its really kind of goofy when you get down to it. Try to play it too serious and you break suspension of disbelief and people start questioning things; like "Isn't this just a one-percenter using his vast resources to beat up the mentally handicapped?" or "How has no-one figured out the vigilante with his own private fighter jet might just be the only guy in the city who could afford his own private fighter jet?"
You need a bit of lightness to hold the whole thing together

Ad Astra (6/10)

I saw this film with a family member. After said film, when I asked him what I thought, he said "it was nothing that a good script couldn't have saved."

That more or less conveys the heart of the matter with Ad Astra. There's some things it does really well, but what lets it down is a shoddy plot, or at least, shoddy writing. The overall frame of the plot is solid, but how we get from point a to b to eventually z is less so. When you look at the critic-user divide for the film on Rotten Tomatoes, it's actually a divide that I can understand. Critics are looking at how the film's crafted, while users are focusing more on plot.

So, what does this film do right? Well, on that, let's start with cinematography. This is a gorgeous looking film. I'm not talking about special effects (not that there's anything wrong with them), but the directing is amazing. Visually (as well as thematically, but that's another issue), the film takes reference from stuff like 2001 and Blade Runner, but still feels distinct. Use of shots, use of colour, the film is masterfully crafted. And this directing style ties in with what the film also does well - theme.

Now, the theme of the film isn't sublte. It's "isolation," and we know it's isolation, because Brad Pitt's character tells us as much. Not directly, but because of the amount of monologuing, it's clear what the film is trying to convey. Show, don't tell, as the saying goes, but Ad Astra both shows and tells. Now, I don't actually mind the monologues so much, but that aside, the film conveys its theme well, and in two key ways. First, again, through visuals. Our protagonist goes from Earth, to Luna, to Mars, to Neptune - each stop on his journey has its own 'essence,' and each is more 'isolated' than before. The further one gets from Earth, the greater the isolation. This is conveyed in directing, in architecture, in the thinning out of characters. And in regards to the theme itself, it runs through everything in this film. From the individual scale (the protagonist) to the inter-personal scale (humans operating in space) to the macro scale (the isolation of humanity in the galaxy). A key plot point in the film is the search for alien life. The question of whether we're alone in the universe. The film does provide an answer at the end, and in a way, it ties in with 2001. Replace Jupiter with Neptune, replace the 'Discovery One' with the 'Lima', and, yeah. I've often said that I don't like 2001, but I can respect it as a film that served as a template for (IMO) better films that came after it. Ad Astra does indeed take reference from 2001, and theme is part of it (though granted, you can also draw comparisons to works such as Solaris and Interstellar). This goes beyond plot as well - the protagonist lands on the moon at/near the Tycho Crater, and if you've seen/read 2001, that should sound familiar.

So, because of all this gushing, the film must be good, right? Well, not quite, because this is where the writing comes in. There's multiple moments in the film where things happen because the plot demands it. I won't give you spoilers, but it's like...like imagine your protagonist comes to a chasm. He needs to cross the chasm. A good writer will work something into the plot to make his crossing of the chasm natural. A bad writer will have an eagle soar down and ferry them across. This isn't the best analogy I could use, but it's similar in principle. Stuff happens because the plot demands it happen. Also, there's three (arguuably four, but I'm going with three) action sequences in the film, and aside from one, I have no real idea why they're here. Ad Astra isn't an action film, but it's a film where action occurs. And I'm not talking about stuff like Blade Runner 2049, where when action occurs, it's brutish, down to earth, and in keeping with the film, the action here feels entirely out of place. There's a solid plot here, but it's like the writers feared that people would tune out if they didn't get some action in.

Also, another thing. The film's producer/director made claims that Ad Astra would be the most accurate film set in space to date, and there were similar claims that it used Heart of Darkness as its foundation. To the first, I say, "no." The film is undoubtedly veering towards the "hard" end of the sci-fi spectrum, but there's plenty of liberties taken. I'm not talking about stuff like hair not floating in zero-g, I'm talking about how the tech in this film seems to work as well as the plot demands. As for Heart of Darknes...maybe. It's been ages since I read the book (and I could never get into it in the first place), but remembering Apocalypse Now, with the protagonist going up the river, and things getting more bleak the further he goes, before reaching the 'heart of darkness' with Kurtz. If I apply that paradigm to Ad Astra, then it kind of works. Kind of. As I said, the protagonist goes from Earth, to the moon, to Mars, to Neptune, and every stop along the way is more desolate than the one preceeding it. And arriving at Lima at Neptune and the stuff that's gone down there, then, yes, it does arguably fit the HoD paradigm, even if less explicitly than Apocalypse Now for instance.

So, Ad Astra. Reaches for the stars, but falls short. Still, while it's a very flawed movie, it's still a very ambitous movie, and one that I'm going to remember for a long time.

The Huntsman: Winter War.

Sequel to the Snow White and the Huntsman film starring Kirsten Stewart. They didn't want her back for this, nominally because she can't act, but really because she was having it off with the director and she should have been true to Robert Patterson because of Twilight or something. Nobody else in that film could act either, excepting perhaps Charlise Theron who'd evidently been ordered not to. Nice visuals, especially the costumes, though.

In this film, again there was nice visuals, especially the costumes, and Charlize Theron had stopped yelling at everyone and started loudly whispering at everyone instead.

If there's only about four or five dozen films you see this year, you should probably see this if you can find it cheap.

Samtemdo8:
Because this was before they devolved into weird alien monsters. Like the mutation began when Draenor was Outland I think.

Ah, ok, was that in the W2 expansion? Cause I've not played that.

Thaluikhain:
The Huntsman: Winter War.

Sequel to the Snow White and the Huntsman film starring Kirsten Stewart. They didn't want her back for this, nominally because she can't act, but really because she was having it off with the director and she should have been true to Robert Patterson because of Twilight or something. Nobody else in that film could act either, excepting perhaps Charlise Theron who'd evidently been ordered not to. Nice visuals, especially the costumes, though.

In this film, again there was nice visuals, especially the costumes, and Charlize Theron had stopped yelling at everyone and started loudly whispering at everyone instead.

If there's only about four or five dozen films you see this year, you should probably see this if you can find it cheap.

Samtemdo8:
Because this was before they devolved into weird alien monsters. Like the mutation began when Draenor was Outland I think.

Ah, ok, was that in the W2 expansion? Cause I've not played that.

Well not really in the Expansion but in lore, Ner'zhul created so many portals to other worlds that it tore Draenor apart. The Alliance heroes remained behind to close the Dark Portal from their end to prevent the explosion from reaching Azeroth.

Rambo Last Blood. I thought it might be as good as Rambo IV. It was more on par with Cobra.

It was not racist. It was Nativist as when his daughter figure says she is visiting Mexico and he looks at her like she said she was going to let Hannibal Lector eat sushi off her nude body. There are Mexicans that are good people in the movie and Rambo likes, rather than slaughters them.

The characters in the movie have very poor motivations, undermining any sense of suspense.

He does do some Rambo style killing of bad guys. One to miss, even if free to stream.

John Wick 3. Not as good as John Wick 1 or John Wick 2.

Between Two Ferns: The Movie 5/10

I had no idea what it was based on. Comedies are often hit and miss and as my five outta ten implies this one is both. The few laughs I got were from the actors going through their weird lines. Because the thing is that it must be hard to act in a mocumentary style comedy. First you can be reaching spectacular levels of almost tangible awkwardness, and one scene later it's all a sketch show. I bet Will Ferrell wrote his role in this.

Going to see Ad Astra tomorrow.

Chimpzy:
Doom: Annihilation - 0

Us humans and self-destruction seem to mix awfully well.

McElroy:

Chimpzy:
Doom: Annihilation - 0

Us humans and self-destruction seem to mix awfully well.

True. I went in knowing full well it was going to be terrible, but I was just compelled to see how bad it could get, and it didn't disappoint.

Chimpzy:

McElroy:

Chimpzy:
Doom: Annihilation - 0

Us humans and self-destruction seem to mix awfully well.

True. I went in knowing full well it was going to be terrible, but I was just compelled to see how bad it could get, and it didn't disappoint.

Is it worse than Mortal Kombat: Annihilation?

I remember that being raised at some point.

Hawki:

Chimpzy:
snip

Is it worse than Mortal Kombat: Annihilation?

I remember that being raised at some point.

MK Annihilation is probably worse, but it's bad enough that the badness becomes amusing. Whereas Doom Annihilation is just barely competent enough that its badness is annoying. If that makes any sense.

Yeah, Ad Astra. A bit weird, oddball of a movie. It's like reading a motivational poster, really slowly, and not really believing it. It's some Hubble telescope picture in the poster. I like the details of the spacecraft as well as the space stations the movie goes through. Pitt's character is calm, calmness embodied, Mr. Bradycardia, which makes his reactions to stress have more impact. It's also a movie on a need-to-know basis. Like when you need to know why something happens, well, they will tell you. Except maybe a couple of times... not relevant to know, I guess! Space age seems to have brought a lot of reverence into people too, but their real God is SPACECOM: the Big Brother entity monitoring astronauts in space. SPACECOM is the dad. From him you keep secrets. His orders you follow. Or defy.

Looks nice. Sounds Amazing. Will win Best Sound Editing and probably Mixing as well.

7/10

I also saw the trailer to Gemini Man with Will Smith and the Fresh Prince and... Rendel? That movie's going to be a crock of shit. Maybe the edit is still in progress or something, but the trailer clips looked BAD. I thought I was watching a commercial (which it technically is, but a movie shouldn't look like that).

Thaluikhain:
Return of the Caped Crusaders.

Proper Adam West Batman, not angsty pretentious rubbish. He's a rich furry vigilante, he shouldn't try to be too serious.

I mean, you could wage similar argument against all the capeshit. Yet here we are with movies like TDK, Endgame or Logan.

MrCalavera:

Thaluikhain:
Return of the Caped Crusaders.

Proper Adam West Batman, not angsty pretentious rubbish. He's a rich furry vigilante, he shouldn't try to be too serious.

I mean, you could wage similar argument against all the capeshit. Yet here we are with movies like TDK, Endgame or Logan.

It's very considerate to pick out an MCU movie too, but Endgame isn't serious at all.

McElroy:

MrCalavera:

Thaluikhain:
Return of the Caped Crusaders.

Proper Adam West Batman, not angsty pretentious rubbish. He's a rich furry vigilante, he shouldn't try to be too serious.

I mean, you could wage similar argument against all the capeshit. Yet here we are with movies like TDK, Endgame or Logan.

It's very considerate to pick out an MCU movie too, but Endgame isn't serious at all.

Should have picked Infinity War what with the meme that it spawned.

Samtemdo8:

McElroy:
It's very considerate to pick out an MCU movie too, but Endgame isn't serious at all.

Should have picked Infinity War what with the meme that it spawned.

Definitely. With or without memes it's a much more serious film.

Dark Crystal

After watching the current TV series, I went back and watched this. In some ways, this is better. Specifically, all the creatures weren't so janky.

But the new series is so much more detailed and rich but it still doesnt justify the show's existence. Also, I have more questions... like why were the Skeksis given any power at all? Alledgedly they wanted to live forever and they got their wish? They were fighting against their own desires? They literally commited genocide but it's all cool because... I'm white? Also, if half yout soul committed murder, and the other didn't, is the body it resides in liable for murder?

How much on an asshole to do have to be to be a Mystic? It's on the same level of Obi-Wan and Yoda. Evil bad guys are murdering people, but I have to hide and wait to train a young kid for a couple of days so they can do all the work. The Mystics are worse for the fact that they could just kill themselves and solve the world's problems. But the Jedi are super powerful but just chickens. It's very moronic.

Why did we likes this movie again? 3/10. This movie finishes very abruptly and needs an epilogue

Joker. I liked it, plot nitpicks here and there, but it's a good movie. Phoenix is impeccable. Most interesting thing out of a comic book in years.

Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood
- Tarantino likes feet
- Tarantino likes some funny sound effects
- Tarantino likes DiCaprio
- this movie sucks
- the very last scene is nice
3/10

McElroy:
Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood
- Tarantino likes feet
- Tarantino likes some funny sound effects
- Tarantino likes DiCaprio
- this movie sucks
- the very last scene is nice
3/10

Funny that, I think it's the best movie of the year. In a perfect world it'd get Picture, Director, Screenplay and/or Cinematography.

Johnny Novgorod:

McElroy:
Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood
- Tarantino likes feet
- Tarantino likes some funny sound effects
- Tarantino likes DiCaprio
- this movie sucks
- the very last scene is nice
3/10

Funny that, I think it's the best movie of the year. In a perfect world it'd get Picture, Director, Screenplay and/or Cinematography.

I didn't get it. The reviews all say it's "a love letter to movies", but to me it just looks like a bunch of long scenes strung together. The violence was ridiculous, like you're watching Family Guy. DiCaprio cries, threatens to kill the viewer too once. Yeah, it has a dynamic timeline-twisting plotline with the Mansons, but its culmination ruined it. Yes, Margot Robbie is HOT. No, I don't want close ups of her feet, and mixing her up with the real Sharon Tate is trashy. I also don't get people's fascination with the soundtrack. Maybe if you're old enough to feel nostalgic about it. Like with the long-ass takes in Lancer.

Avengement. Some proper British choreographed violence. Thin on plot TBH, but lots of punchy-kicky.

Joker. Had to drive to the midnight premiere but was not disappoint. Joaquin Phoenix plays the role with both a vulnerable and macabre intensity that is almost hypnotic; every little twitch of his semi-emaciated body and contorted facial expression makes his uncontrollable laughter that much more unnerving. Socially isolated and rejected by both nature and nurture it seems his failure to connect hurts him to the core and you can literally see the pain in his eyes. That is just insanely good acting,

I don't know how deep Phoenix had to dig in his psyche to make this persona come to life. I love how first his laughter is forced from anguish and mental illness but as Fleck's psyche begin to fracture from emotional trauma and severe alienation you can see his already weak grasp on reality deteriorating further to make presence for the Joker we know and love like some kind of demonic entity that corrupts his body and soul. Again truly mesmerizing acting by Phoenix as he laughs, cries, suffers, makes a sound like he's coughing up a moth ball like his descend into insanity itself is a joke. I love, love, love as he slowly walks through the hallway as his transformation is almost complete.

I read online how many critics and even the director himself dismiss this as a 'Joker' film but I very much disagree. Interpretation of the Joker has always been wildly varied and that you can make a movie like this only shows how flexible the source material is. A lot of the '80s graphic novels definitely tried to pull the Joker in a similar direction and you can argue since it's inception before the Comics Code Joker was very much inspired by The Man Who Laughs. This Joker actually reminded me of an Alan Moore depiction where he is a failed comedian that gets made advantage of or one that can only find some solace for his emotional pain by hugging a prostitute, Though, in typical Joker fashion this was just 'one of the many ways' he remembered it but even Joker the movie riffs on the same concept.

Even Gotham as this run down shithole feels very much like the city that Batman is going to inherit. I also loved the neat little tie ins to the Batman lore. All were very subtle and dosed like the ominous descend of both Fleck and the city were setting the stage for things to come.

There was some controversy how this movie could incite 'incel' violence but I didn't really see it tbh. You could say yeah, ofcourse Fleck is a marginalized figure that other 'outcasts' could potentially over identify with but it's not as if crazy needs an excuse. 'Rejection' is a central theme of this movie but it relates softly to Fleck's failed romantic endeavours and more to his encroaching psychosis that cuts him off from the world and the contextual societal decline of Gotham is also bigger than Fleck himself. I don't think the sporadic violence in the movie is glorified either. It's sudden, abrupt and profoundly ugly. The only thing that's cherished is Fleck's desperate need for validation either through total chaos or stand-up comedy. Anything that cements the existence of this fading light.

I've been hyped for over a year for this movie and loved it sooooo much. It exceeded my expectations and then some. Without a doubt my most favorite movie of the last few decades and an absolute treat as a lifelong Batman fan. 10/10

stroopwafel:
Snip

A bit off-topic, but how would you say Phoenix compares to the other (live action) Jokers?

The Postman, by and with Kevin Costner

I decided to watch it mostly because I wanted to have seen it before Death Stranding comes out, as it seems to have been one of its bigger influences. It's a movie that has gotten really bad reviews back in the day, sitting at a 9% on Rotten Tomatoes. And this might just be me being me but... what the hell is supposed to be so bad about it? It was a pretty good movie.

Kevin Costner plays a drifter and travelling showman in postapocalyptic America. After a performance in a small village he gets captured by and conscripted into a fascist militia under the leadership of the charismatic General Bethlehem (Will Patton). After managing to desert he comes upon a dead postmans uniform and pretends to be a servant of a newly formed American government, tasked to reestablish the postal system to get food and shelter. Believing his story, people rally around the idea of a new America, putting them in conflict with Bethlehem's militia. Again, I thought it was overall pretty good. It does veer into a slightly obnoxious American patriotism every now and then but the overall premise of reuniting a country after its collapse is not a bad one and I felt that Costner managed to stage a very earnest and very sincere adaptation of that premise. Earnest to a fault, sure, but I still find that less tiresome than forced cynicism.

In some ways the movie looks and feels a bit like a Western or a movie about the American Civil War, people ride on horsebacks and use horse drawn carriages and most of it is set in rural Oregon. It's a pretty decent variation on post apocalyptic America and it made me once again realize that most stories about a Zombie Apocalypse would probably be better if you just took out the Zombies. All that aside though, it was a very well shot movie. It didn't look like you'd expect a post apocalyptic movie to look like from a modern perspective, is what I'm trying to say. It didn't revel in its own bleakness but presented a pretty hopeful approach to the setting.

So, basically, I liked it. It's good. I'd recommend it. It's a bit corny and doesn't have the tightest screenplay but emotionally and narratively it mostly hits the right notes. It's a rock solid premise executed in a rock solid way. Looking forward to seeing what Hideo Kojima is gonna do with it.

PsychedelicDiamond:
The Postman, by and with Kevin Costner

I decided to watch it mostly because I wanted to have seen it before Death Stranding comes out, as it seems to have been one of its bigger influences. It's a movie that has gotten really bad reviews back in the day, sitting at a 9% on Rotten Tomatoes. And this might just be me being me but... what the hell is supposed to be so bad about it? It was a pretty good movie.

Yeah, saw that many years ago, then later found it I was supposed to hate it for some reason. Not saying it's great, but don't see why it's bad.

Hawki:

stroopwafel:
Snip

A bit off-topic, but how would you say Phoenix compares to the other (live action) Jokers?

Phoenix is definitely my personal favorite but that is also b/c I like these kind of intimate dramas more than big spectacle movies. Though, the others(Nicholson, Ledger) were very good in their own right as well ofcourse. But the accents are so different that they are difficult to compare despite sharing similar degrees in acting intensity. Ledger's Joker for example was this enigmatic, ostensibly chaotic, sinister genius while Phoenix' Joker is this clumsy, misunderstood tortured soul with a demonic undercurrent.

PsychedelicDiamond:
The Postman, by and with Kevin Costner

I decided to watch it mostly because I wanted to have seen it before Death Stranding comes out, as it seems to have been one of its bigger influences. It's a movie that has gotten really bad reviews back in the day, sitting at a 9% on Rotten Tomatoes. And this might just be me being me but... what the hell is supposed to be so bad about it? It was a pretty good movie.

Kevin Costner plays a drifter and travelling showman in postapocalyptic America. After a performance in a small village he gets captured by and conscripted into a fascist militia under the leadership of the charismatic General Bethlehem (Will Patton). After managing to desert he comes upon a dead postmans uniform and pretends to be a servant of a newly formed American government, tasked to reestablish the postal system to get food and shelter. Believing his story, people rally around the idea of a new America, putting them in conflict with Bethlehem's militia. Again, I thought it was overall pretty good. It does veer into a slightly obnoxious American patriotism every now and then but the overall premise of reuniting a country after its collapse is not a bad one and I felt that Costner managed to stage a very earnest and very sincere adaptation of that premise. Earnest to a fault, sure, but I still find that less tiresome than forced cynicism.

In some ways the movie looks and feels a bit like a Western or a movie about the American Civil War, people ride on horsebacks and use horse drawn carriages and most of it is set in rural Oregon. It's a pretty decent variation on post apocalyptic America and it made me once again realize that most stories about a Zombie Apocalypse would probably be better if you just took out the Zombies. All that aside though, it was a very well shot movie. It didn't look like you'd expect a post apocalyptic movie to look like from a modern perspective, is what I'm trying to say. It didn't revel in its own bleakness but presented a pretty hopeful approach to the setting.

So, basically, I liked it. It's good. I'd recommend it. It's a bit corny and doesn't have the tightest screenplay but emotionally and narratively it mostly hits the right notes. It's a rock solid premise executed in a rock solid way. Looking forward to seeing what Hideo Kojima is gonna do with it.

I've always liked The Postman, thought it was a great film, but I also liked Waterworld, so I've stayed silent all these years, but NO MORE!! #MeToo

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