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Director's cut of Kingdom of Heaven. Haven't seen the normal version in a while, so don't know how different it was, but either way, quite a good film.

Red Sparrow 7/10

Went into this film not knowing what to expect... left feeling filthy, intrigued and certainly confused.

Jennifer Lawrence plays a Russian prima ballerina whose career is cut short due to an injury, and with an ailing mother to care for, she finds herself with no choice but to enter into indentured servitude to her uncle, a man of great import in the Russian government's intelligence wing. What kind of servitude? Oh, the kind wherein young, beautiful people are trained to use sex to manipulate others to covertly get what the government wants from them. The "school" trains these people to completely rid themselves of the any and all customary ideas and feelings about human sexuality and treat sex simply as a clinical interaction of body parts, a tool, and as their bodies belong to the state, nothing the job requires is off limits. It's a rough watch at times (no shortage of rape and torture scenes both of which I'm particularly sensitive to,) but on the whole, it kept me watching, my head going back and forth, wondering who's playing who. Like a lot of films about political intrigue and espionage, it gets its head up its own ass as it intentionally tangles the web it's weaving, but the ending is an extremely satisfying payoff I certainly did not see coming. Worth another watch to see what I missed.

Black Magic for White Boys
A weirdo pilot-turned-movie comedy that centers on a magic show that involves 'actual' magic. The protagonists are three horrible, self-centered misanthropes: the magician, Larry, who can actually make people disappear (starting with his annoying wife) and two friends who go see the show, Oscar (played by the director of the movie, who looks like a cross between George Lucas and Harold Ramis), whose one night stand ended with a pregnant girlfriend and now wants to disappear the embryo, and Jamie, who plans to use the disappearing act to help his real estate scam. The acting is a bit amateurish and its TV origins show up in how awkwardly stitched certain characters and subplots are, but there's a raw, grungy appeal to the story that I liked and found compelling. It's all very silly but the movie runs with it at face value, like magical realism. Worked for me.

Doctor Sleep
Torn on this one. A lot of it is devoted to aping the original movie, especially at the very beginning (which acts as a sort of epilogue for The Shining) and then the final stretch, which plays out as if somebody built a kitschy theme ride inside the Overlook, compressing the original movie into 20 minutes of Greatest Hits. In between we get a more or less original movie that is by no means scary but hey, at least it's doing its own thing and making me interested in where it goes. The bulk of the plot teases an epic three-way standoff between grown-up Danny Torrance, a Disney-issue Chosen One called "Abra" and a cult of psychic vampires led by a darn good Rebecca Ferguson. Yes, it's all tremendously silly but highly entertaining. On the other hand it tries a little too hard for its own good to replicate the original's power while lacking any of the nuance or ambiguity. Also: fucking jumpscares, man.

"Not an embarrassment like Terminator: Dark Fate"/10

Mr and Mrs Smith. Bought a bunch of cheap movies recently, I can see why this one was in the bargain bin.

Maybe it was alright back when Brangelina were still a thing.

Thaluikhain:
Mr and Mrs Smith. Bought a bunch of cheap movies recently, I can see why this one was in the bargain bin.

Maybe it was alright back when Brangelina were still a thing.

No.

It wasn't

Thaluikhain:
Director's cut of Kingdom of Heaven. Haven't seen the normal version in a while, so don't know how different it was, but either way, quite a good film.

They completely cut the Child of the Eva Green's character in the original. The attack of the caravan is extended and more brutal in the Director's Cut

You actually see Saladin chop Reynald's head off in the director's cut. The duel between Guy and Balian was cut in the Theatrical Version.

The Priest Balian kills in France for cutting off the head of his wife's corpse was actually Balian's Brother which was not mentioned in the Theatrical version.

Liam Nesson didn't straight up said "Balian, I am your father" in the Director's Cut, the reveal was more subtle.

"Mackenzie Davis is cute but so annoying. Half of her lines are "I'm enhanced". That's her role. I like her haircut though"
- Girlfriend texting about Terminator: Dark Fate.

trunkage:

Thaluikhain:
Mr and Mrs Smith. Bought a bunch of cheap movies recently, I can see why this one was in the bargain bin.

Maybe it was alright back when Brangelina were still a thing.

No.

It wasn't

Try telling that to my parents, my older brother, most of my aunts on my mom's side of the family, and old high school friends. In all seriousness, the movie is just average and was mostly hype on Brad and Angelina being a thing. I never cared much for Brad outside of Fight Club & Seven. Jolie I have fonder memories of, but I lost interests in her when I got to my late teens.

TMNT (2014) & Out of Shadows. They're great Turtle films and got way too much hate from the Internet. No thanks to a certain movie critic(s) that shall not be named. Yeah, yeah, Bay is the producer, but he did not have much influence and he actually fixed some of the problems. BTW, the turtles were never going to be aliens. It was dumb rumor that hot out of control and sent the hardcore fans in to a frenzy.

Back to the movies themselves. TMNT (2014) only flaw is that April is the lead for the 20 minutes, after that it's both hers and the turtles movie. Also, it was pretty clear that Eric Sachs was supposed to be Shredder in the original cut, but people complained about "white washed Shredder". Even though, there have been so many different versions or variations that are a woman, alien, or computer virus. I would have preferred the original vision in this case. While controversial, the turtles are great in my opinion and there was obviously love and care put in to the subtle details in each turtle. Hell, look at any of the behind the scenes footage, and tell me "no effort were put in to these movies". That's a load of bull.

Out of Shadows is even better and is almost as good as the 1990 original The only thing that sucks is this movie has the worst version of Casey Jones, and the Turtles never get to fight Shredder. They were saving that for a third movie that is never going to happen now. Otherwise, I reccomend both films to ninja or turtle fans. These movies are better than the Turtles sequels that came out in the 90s and the CG animated movie.

20 Million Miles to Earth, a black and white film that was one of the first Ray Harryhausen did his stop motion "dynamation" special effects for. Not a classic, but it holds up quite well.

Of particular note is the US military working with the Italians, and recognising the guy who just wants to kill the space monster, not capture it for study is just doing his job to protect people. Nowdays, they'd either run all over the local foreign types, if they remember they have a government at all.

Ford v Ferrari
American arrogance vs Old World arrogance. 'muricah can shit a record ton of cars but Ferrari actually makes good ones. Henry Ford II tries buying Ferrari, because money can buy anything (except Ferrari) and upon rejection decides to go to "war" with the Italians by actually making something that has a shot at winning a famous 24 hour race. But the movie is really about the Damon and Bale characters, who give powerful performances, and more about their personal struggles with themselves (and Ford's corporate meddling). Now I'm not a car or racing fan but, for what it's woth, I liked the movie. The racing scenes have actual weight to them and the low-angle tracking shots give them a French Connection/Ronin intensity and feeling of speed to them.

The Tomb Raider Reboot, featuring a Lara Croft who seems smaller than when she was Angelina Jolie, but has the same sized arms (Angelina Jolie should wear long sleeves when doing action, IMHO).

Eh, took a while to get going, and she's a bit thick, but decent enough. Some random elements look lifted from the game (and some names of characters), but overall it was quite different.

Also that bit with the pawn shop (in London) with the case full of guns...yeah, no. London is in England.

A Hidden Life
Terrence Malick's latest movie, a real-life story about an Austrian farmer and conscientious objector who was imprisoned and executed during WW2. Malick's movies as of Tree of Life tend to verge of the side of insufferable New Age tripe, shot in that infuriatingly vague perfume commercial aesthetic complete with "deep", monotonous VO from the characters. This one benefits from telling an actual story with the theme front and center for all of its 3 hours, so for once the style doesn't outweigh the substance but rather is at its service.

Il Traditore
Italians have a bizarre love & hate for the Mafia. It appears to encompass all of the things they value: honor, family, food, getting away with things. It just so happens to exis on the other side of the law, big deal. The movie's about one of the biggest traitors (title drop) in the Palermo mob, Tomasso Buscetta, whhose arrest, extradition and testimony resulted in convictions over hundreds and hundreds of murders in the 80s. The movie switches gears every 30 minutes or so and for a while I was mostly confused by all the characters and asynchronous murders/arrests. The movie picks up steam once Tomasso is in custody and the story gets a clear direction, including some folksy comedy from all the imprisoned gangsters. Parts reminded me of Find Me Guilty, always a plus.

Family Romance, LCC.
Herzog's new movie. Thought I was in for another documentary but it's actually a fiction, or at least docufiction, in that the context for each scene is obviously fictional but the content isn't (or sometimes it's the other way around). What the movie is actually about, is a man who runs "Family Romance", a company in which he rents himself to stand in for people. Like that Larry Middleman joke from Arrested Development but without the camera, and sometimes he's subbing for people who don't even exist. It's a bizarre premise and the movie's shot in an equally bizarre way. I guess if the movie's about anything it's the need and value of genuine human connection, and the movie isn't really judging "Family Romance" as something good or bad, or even natural or artificial, but rather a symptom of the human condition, in all of its warmth and silliness.

Johnny Novgorod:
Doctor Sleep
Torn on this one. A lot of it is devoted to aping the original movie, especially at the very beginning (which acts as a sort of epilogue for The Shining) and then the final stretch, which plays out as if somebody built a kitschy theme ride inside the Overlook, compressing the original movie into 20 minutes of Greatest Hits. In between we get a more or less original movie that is by no means scary but hey, at least it's doing its own thing and making me interested in where it goes. The bulk of the plot teases an epic three-way standoff between grown-up Danny Torrance, a Disney-issue Chosen One called "Abra" and a cult of psychic vampires led by a darn good Rebecca Ferguson. Yes, it's all tremendously silly but highly entertaining. On the other hand it tries a little too hard for its own good to replicate the original's power while lacking any of the nuance or ambiguity. Also: fucking jumpscares, man.

"Not an embarrassment like Terminator: Dark Fate"/10

Doctor Sleep is freaking awesome. Definitely an attention to detail and surprisingly, it's a sequel to the Shining (film) and not the book. There was big effort put in to this movie. Better than IT Chapter 2, and I liked Chapter 2. Also, there weren't that many jump scares. Only like two of them. I do understand the frustration. This became a problem with horror films in the 2000s.

CoCage:

Johnny Novgorod:
Doctor Sleep
Torn on this one. A lot of it is devoted to aping the original movie, especially at the very beginning (which acts as a sort of epilogue for The Shining) and then the final stretch, which plays out as if somebody built a kitschy theme ride inside the Overlook, compressing the original movie into 20 minutes of Greatest Hits. In between we get a more or less original movie that is by no means scary but hey, at least it's doing its own thing and making me interested in where it goes. The bulk of the plot teases an epic three-way standoff between grown-up Danny Torrance, a Disney-issue Chosen One called "Abra" and a cult of psychic vampires led by a darn good Rebecca Ferguson. Yes, it's all tremendously silly but highly entertaining. On the other hand it tries a little too hard for its own good to replicate the original's power while lacking any of the nuance or ambiguity. Also: fucking jumpscares, man.

"Not an embarrassment like Terminator: Dark Fate"/10

Doctor Sleep id freaking awesome. Definitely an attention to detail and surprisingly, it's a sequel to the Shining (film) and not the book. There was big effort put in to this movie. Better than IT Chapter 2, and I liked Chapter 2. Also, there weren't that many jump scares. Only like two of them. I do understand the frustration. This became a problem with horror films in the 2000s.

Well I think it sucks. Maybe it wouldn't suck as much if it wasn't constantly comparing itself to an actual masterpiece while also rehashing its most iconic moments and stringing them apropos of nothing like it's a theme park ride. It's overdone and stupid and devoid of mystery or ambiguity, which was the strength of the original. By giving us generic bad guys (vampires for crying out loud) and constantly cutting back to them the movie becomes a simple action thriller of just waiting for a series of confrontations between vampires and the good guys, who essentially act as X-Men, complete with handwaves and one-liners. This movie did for "the shining" what the prequels did to "the force": over-explain, de-mystify, quantify, weaponize. It sucks.

I compare it to Dark Fate because it follows the Star Wars model or reprising a beloved classic: bring back one of the main characters as a fuck-up and have them coach/sponsor a younger, idealistic minority to take over the fight they themselves lost (or rather, are retconned to have lost). Only Dark Fate felt more cynical and heavy-handed, and Sleep at least has good acting from Ewan, lady vampire and not-Halloran.

Johnny Novgorod:

CoCage:

Johnny Novgorod:
Doctor Sleep
Torn on this one. A lot of it is devoted to aping the original movie, especially at the very beginning (which acts as a sort of epilogue for The Shining) and then the final stretch, which plays out as if somebody built a kitschy theme ride inside the Overlook, compressing the original movie into 20 minutes of Greatest Hits. In between we get a more or less original movie that is by no means scary but hey, at least it's doing its own thing and making me interested in where it goes. The bulk of the plot teases an epic three-way standoff between grown-up Danny Torrance, a Disney-issue Chosen One called "Abra" and a cult of psychic vampires led by a darn good Rebecca Ferguson. Yes, it's all tremendously silly but highly entertaining. On the other hand it tries a little too hard for its own good to replicate the original's power while lacking any of the nuance or ambiguity. Also: fucking jumpscares, man.

"Not an embarrassment like Terminator: Dark Fate"/10

Doctor Sleep id freaking awesome. Definitely an attention to detail and surprisingly, it's a sequel to the Shining (film) and not the book. There was big effort put in to this movie. Better than IT Chapter 2, and I liked Chapter 2. Also, there weren't that many jump scares. Only like two of them. I do understand the frustration. This became a problem with horror films in the 2000s.

Well I think it sucks. Maybe it wouldn't suck as much if it wasn't constantly comparing itself to an actual masterpiece while also rehashing its most iconic moments and stringing them apropos of nothing like it's a theme park ride. It's overdone and stupid and devoid of mystery or ambiguity, which was the strength of the original. By giving us generic bad guys (vampires for crying out loud) and constantly cutting back to them the movie becomes a simple action thriller of just waiting for a series of confrontations between vampires and the good guys, who essentially act as X-Men, complete with handwaves and one-liners. This movie did for "the shining" what the prequels did to "the force": over-explain, de-mystify, quantify, weaponize. It sucks.

I compare it to Dark Fate because it follows the Star Wars model or reprising a beloved classic: bring back one of the main characters as a fuck-up and have them coach/sponsor a younger, idealistic minority to take over the fight they themselves lost (or rather, are retconned to have lost). Only Dark Fate felt more cynical and heavy-handed, and Sleep at least has good acting from Ewan, lady vampire and not-Halloran.

I disagree. While Dr. Sleep borrows elements from the Shining, it more or less stands on its own and does its own thing. Which is what most sequels should do if they need to be made in the first place. The vampires are in the book, albeit, they're uglier there, while normal looking in the films. So that is not the movie's fault. The last 20 minutes of the movie earned that "theme park" ride. What I like about Dr. Sleep is that it takes elements from both versions of the Shining and uses them well. While some ambiguity is loss, I don't see it as much as a big deal. I do like the film version of the Shining, but I do feel it can be a bit overblown on the masterpiece department. Also, I was not expecting a RWBY reference in a Stephen King movie of all places. That was a pleasant surprise, even though I am not a fan of the web series. A nice subtle use if I do say so myself.

As for Dark Fate, I'm skipping it for a reason. It's just another bad live action fan fic. There does not need to be anymore sequels to Alien, Terminator, nor Predator (not unless your adapting the arcade version of AVP as it originally was supposed to be). I am glad Linda Hamilton still looks good and taken care of herself, but I have no interest. The last decent Terminator movie after Judgement Day was Salvation. At least Salvation tried something different. I think it really only fall apart with the Marcus sub-plot. Something, I think was not needed in the film.

CoCage:

Johnny Novgorod:

CoCage:

Doctor Sleep id freaking awesome. Definitely an attention to detail and surprisingly, it's a sequel to the Shining (film) and not the book. There was big effort put in to this movie. Better than IT Chapter 2, and I liked Chapter 2. Also, there weren't that many jump scares. Only like two of them. I do understand the frustration. This became a problem with horror films in the 2000s.

Well I think it sucks. Maybe it wouldn't suck as much if it wasn't constantly comparing itself to an actual masterpiece while also rehashing its most iconic moments and stringing them apropos of nothing like it's a theme park ride. It's overdone and stupid and devoid of mystery or ambiguity, which was the strength of the original. By giving us generic bad guys (vampires for crying out loud) and constantly cutting back to them the movie becomes a simple action thriller of just waiting for a series of confrontations between vampires and the good guys, who essentially act as X-Men, complete with handwaves and one-liners. This movie did for "the shining" what the prequels did to "the force": over-explain, de-mystify, quantify, weaponize. It sucks.

I compare it to Dark Fate because it follows the Star Wars model or reprising a beloved classic: bring back one of the main characters as a fuck-up and have them coach/sponsor a younger, idealistic minority to take over the fight they themselves lost (or rather, are retconned to have lost). Only Dark Fate felt more cynical and heavy-handed, and Sleep at least has good acting from Ewan, lady vampire and not-Halloran.

I disagree. While Dr. Sleep borrows elements from the Shining, it more or less stands on its own and does its own thing. Which is what most sequels should do if they need to be made in the first place. The vampires are in the book, albeit, they're uglier there, while normal looking in the films. So that is not the movie's fault. The last 20 minutes of the movie earned that "theme park" ride. What I like about Dr. Sleep is that it takes elements from both versions of the Shining and uses them well. While some ambiguity is loss, I don't see it as much as a big deal. I do like the film version of the Shining, but I do feel it can be a bit overblown on the masterpiece department. Also, I was not expecting a RWBY reference in a Stephen King movie of all places. That was a pleasant surprise, even though I am not a fan of the web series. A nice subtle use if I do say so myself.

I don't think there's anything 'subtle' about Dr. Sleep. There's a RWBY poster in the kid's room, so what? Somebody's kid in the art department probably likes it. That's that.

"It's in the movie because it's in the book" is a weak argument for justifying the (any) plot's dumber elements. I don't think there's a single good King movie where a good measure of stupid doesn't get ditched in the translation, including the original The Shining. King's a hack and the only good movies are the ones where the director does what King's editors won't.

If the sequel wanted to "stand on its own" it shouldn't have been inviting comparisons to an actual horror classic every 10 minutes by redoing the same moments and angles and dramatizing some of its most iconic scenes with SNL-level lookalikes. Symptomatic of the need for overdoing things, 'redrum' can't just show up on a wall anymore, plain and simple, now it has to BURST with a loud bang from the wallpaper, spidery cracks decorating the letters, stopping short from a song-and-dance.

The theme park ride ending had nothing to do with the rest of the movie so there was no way of "earning" it. To reduce The Shining to a series of Halloween style gags is to miss the point of the movie. There was no need to go to the Overlook in the first place and no reason to fear the vampires, considering the heroes stay ahead of them for most of the movie and in the end all it took to mow down most of them was a couple of hunting rifles and one unbuckled seatbelt.

O que arde
Galician movie about a pyromaniac and ex-con returning to his hometown to live with his ma. Everybody knows what he did, much to his shame, but he gets along with the country folk and they're fairly kind to him. He gets a job, kinda, and kinda starts courting a cute vet. But no matter what there's always an unspoken, insurmountable distance between him and everybody else. And of course the movie ends with a big ass fire, leading to one of my least favorite tropes in any story, in which people could save themselves a lot of pathos if they bothered to ask or explain things for 5 minutes.

Les enfants d'Isadora
Isadora Duncan lost her head in a car accident (scarf caught in the wheels). Before that she lost both her kids in another car accident. In between she composed "Mother", a powerful solo dance about loss and grief. The movie, set in modern times, is about 4 women who come in contact with this dance. And that's about it. 90-ish minutes of women either rehearsing the dance or spectacting it. You end up torn between the undeniable power of these emotions but also the fact that there's very little variation to the movie, so by its (prolongued) end you're like

image

Johnny Novgorod:

CoCage:

Johnny Novgorod:

Well I think it sucks. Maybe it wouldn't suck as much if it wasn't constantly comparing itself to an actual masterpiece while also rehashing its most iconic moments and stringing them apropos of nothing like it's a theme park ride. It's overdone and stupid and devoid of mystery or ambiguity, which was the strength of the original. By giving us generic bad guys (vampires for crying out loud) and constantly cutting back to them the movie becomes a simple action thriller of just waiting for a series of confrontations between vampires and the good guys, who essentially act as X-Men, complete with handwaves and one-liners. This movie did for "the shining" what the prequels did to "the force": over-explain, de-mystify, quantify, weaponize. It sucks.

I compare it to Dark Fate because it follows the Star Wars model or reprising a beloved classic: bring back one of the main characters as a fuck-up and have them coach/sponsor a younger, idealistic minority to take over the fight they themselves lost (or rather, are retconned to have lost). Only Dark Fate felt more cynical and heavy-handed, and Sleep at least has good acting from Ewan, lady vampire and not-Halloran.

I disagree. While Dr. Sleep borrows elements from the Shining, it more or less stands on its own and does its own thing. Which is what most sequels should do if they need to be made in the first place. The vampires are in the book, albeit, they're uglier there, while normal looking in the films. So that is not the movie's fault. The last 20 minutes of the movie earned that "theme park" ride. What I like about Dr. Sleep is that it takes elements from both versions of the Shining and uses them well. While some ambiguity is loss, I don't see it as much as a big deal. I do like the film version of the Shining, but I do feel it can be a bit overblown on the masterpiece department. Also, I was not expecting a RWBY reference in a Stephen King movie of all places. That was a pleasant surprise, even though I am not a fan of the web series. A nice subtle use if I do say so myself.

I don't think there's anything 'subtle' about Dr. Sleep. There's a RWBY poster in the kid's room, so what? Somebody's kid in the art department probably likes it. That's that.

"It's in the movie because it's in the book" is a weak argument for justifying the (any) plot's dumber elements. I don't think there's a single good King movie where a good measure of stupid doesn't get ditched in the translation, including the original The Shining. King's a hack and the only good movies are the ones where the director does what King's editors won't.

If the sequel wanted to "stand on its own" it shouldn't have been inviting comparisons to an actual horror classic every 10 minutes by redoing the same moments and angles and dramatizing some of its most iconic scenes with SNL-level lookalikes. Symptomatic of the need for overdoing things, 'redrum' can't just show up on a wall anymore, plain and simple, now it has to BURST with a loud bang from the wallpaper, spidery cracks decorating the letters, stopping short from a song-and-dance.

The theme park ride ending had nothing to do with the rest of the movie so there was no way of "earning" it. To reduce The Shining to a series of Halloween style gags is to miss the point of the movie. There was no need to go to the Overlook in the first place and no reason to fear the vampires, considering the heroes stay ahead of them for most of the movie and in the end all it took to mow down most of them was a couple of hunting rifles and one unbuckled seatbelt.

Actually the RWBY reference has some minor meaning. Abra's Powers work similar to Emerald's. The dark skin girl with the green hair. You even see a figure of Emerald on Abra's nightstand, and in one of the illusion sequences, she gives herself Emerald's hair color and hair style. Just something neat I felt like pointing out.

I wasn't making excuses as far as it's in the book argument. I was just saying it's in both versions; love it or hate it. Plus, the emotional eating vampires is that a great combination of silly and scary, and I love it.

If Stephen King is a hack, then HP Lovecraft is the God of all hacks. I know Stephen King to be hit or miss with certain people, but I enjoy most of his works. He does have some bad novels, or bad conclusions to novels. Overall, he's got great works. If you're not a thing and I understand.

CoCage]

As for Dark Fate, I'm skipping it for a reason. It's just another bad live action fan fic.

Your loss.

I mean, I can buy the argument that every Terminator film post-T2 is fanfic, but Dark Fate is good, if not great fanfic.

There does not need to be anymore sequels to Alien, Terminator, nor Predator

More. More I say!

Okay, that aside, Alien and Predator sequels can come ad infinitum for me because when you get down to it, both series are ultimately anthologies. Alien is basically one trilogy grouped by a single character (Alien, Aliens, Alien 3), one prequel series grouped by a single character (Prometheus, Covenant) and Alien: Resurrection being its own thing (no, Ripley 8 isn't Ellen Ripley). Similarly, the four Predator films are only tangentally connected, so it's basically a template for allowing whatever scenario the film calls for.

I kind of feel that Terminator is in a similar position. As I've stated, we have the "bedrock" (T1, T2), and then multiple timelines/series that use that bedrock as a launching off point. It's why Dark Fate doesn't bother me with certain elements as it would if it was the only third film that existed, because whatever happens, it's just another installment out of multiple installments for me.

(not unless your adapting the arcade version of AVP as it originally was supposed to be).

That beat 'em up?

How the heck would that even work narratively? Earth overrun by xenos, plucky four slaughter thousands of them? Like, okay, but how does that fit in with the series up to that which have always had a few yautja/xenos in a confined area (even "Aliens" is relatively limited in the amount of xenos on-screen).

At least Salvation tried something different. I think it really only fall apart with the Marcus sub-plot. Something, I think was not needed in the film.

So I like every Terminator movie bar T3, but Salvation takes the #5 spot for me. Marcus is simultaniously one of the film's strengths and also one of its weaknesses. Because on one hand, it's an interesting idea with him, conceptually. On the other, for a film that obstenibly stars John Connor, and is meant to show his journey from frontline fighter to leader of the Resistance, Marcus gets the lion's share of the screen time. Which isn't bad in of itself, but the result is that the movie spends most of its time on a character that's dead by the end of it, in a movie that has to factor in John's character arc, while also showing Kyle Reese.

Johnny Novgorod:

I don't think there's anything 'subtle' about Dr. Sleep. There's a RWBY poster in the kid's room,

God damn it, I can't get away from that show. :(

Hey Rooster Teeth. When's Nomad of Nowhere Season 2 coming out?

Hawki:

CoCage]

As for Dark Fate, I'm skipping it for a reason. It's just another bad live action fan fic.

Your loss.

The only loser is that shitty movie. 130 million dollars so far.

CoCage:

Actually the RWBY reference has some minor meaning. Abra's Powers work similar to Emerald's. The dark skin with the green hair. You even see a figure of Emerald on Abra's nightstand, and in one of the illusion sequences, she gives herself Emerald's hair color and hair style. Do something neat I felt like pointing out.

I wasn't making excuses as far as it's in the book argument. I was just saying it's in both versions; love it or hate it. Plus, the motion eating vampires is that a great combination of silly and scary, and I love it.

If Stephen King is a hack, then HP Lovecraft is the God of all hacks. I know Stephen King to be hit or miss with certain people, but I enjoy most of his works. He does have some bad novels, or bad conclusions to novels. Overall, he's got great works. If you're not a thing and I understand.

RWBY looks like one of those loli shows that I want to stay as far away from as humanly possible, frankly.
And my "thing" is simply good movies, I don't care where you get your source material. I've yet to see a good Lovecraft movie, but his stories are great. King is a hack who at best can inspire actual good artists. The last thing The Shining needed was The Shining 2, especially if it had to include anime, vampires and X-Men. Horror doesn't go well with over-explaining, over-showing and over-doing, something HP knew very well and so should King if he's such a big fan.

Johnny Novgorod:

Hawki:

CoCage]

As for Dark Fate, I'm skipping it for a reason. It's just another bad live action fan fic.

Your loss.

The only loser is that shitty movie. 130 million dollars so far.

CoCage:

Actually the RWBY reference has some minor meaning. Abra's Powers work similar to Emerald's. The dark skin with the green hair. You even see a figure of Emerald on Abra's nightstand, and in one of the illusion sequences, she gives herself Emerald's hair color and hair style. Do something neat I felt like pointing out.

I wasn't making excuses as far as it's in the book argument. I was just saying it's in both versions; love it or hate it. Plus, the motion eating vampires is that a great combination of silly and scary, and I love it.

If Stephen King is a hack, then HP Lovecraft is the God of all hacks. I know Stephen King to be hit or miss with certain people, but I enjoy most of his works. He does have some bad novels, or bad conclusions to novels. Overall, he's got great works. If you're not a thing and I understand.

RWBY looks like one of those loli shows that I want to stay as far away from as humanly possible, frankly.
And my "thing" is simply good movies, I don't care where you get your source material. I've yet to see a good Lovecraft movie, but his stories are great. King is a hack who at best can inspire actual good artists. The last thing The Shining needed was The Shining 2, especially if it had to include anime, vampires and X-Men. Horror doesn't go well with over-explaining, over-showing and over-doing, something HP knew very well and so should King if he's such a big fan.

RWBY is not a loli show. For one, most of the characters are in their mid-teens starting, and are either late teens or early adults by the 6th season. The show is not my cup of tea, but I can think of many anime shows way worse than RWBY. At least RWBY actually tries. Tries more than a lot of modern anime today, a good amount from the mid 2000s.

HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

Doctor Sleep is more suspense thriller than horror. The book is more so the latter. Nothing wrong with a change of genres my friend. When done correctly, and the movie did fine for me. The film still had some creepy moments, but overall, I was not exactly scared, but there is nothing wrong with that. Rose the Hat (head vampire lady) did an amazing job, and is now one of my personal favorite Stephen King villains.

Hawki:

CoCage]

As for Dark Fate, I'm skipping it for a reason. It's just another bad live action fan fic.

Your loss.

I mean, I can buy the argument that every Terminator film post-T2 is fanfic, but Dark Fate is good, if not great fanfic.

There does not need to be anymore sequels to Alien, Terminator, nor Predator

More. More I say!

Okay, that aside, Alien and Predator sequels can come ad infinitum for me because when you get down to it, both series are ultimately anthologies. Alien is basically one trilogy grouped by a single character (Alien, Aliens, Alien 3), one prequel series grouped by a single character (Prometheus, Covenant) and Alien: Resurrection being its own thing (no, Ripley 8 isn't Ellen Ripley). Similarly, the four Predator films are only tangentally connected, so it's basically a template for allowing whatever scenario the film calls for.

I kind of feel that Terminator is in a similar position. As I've stated, we have the "bedrock" (T1, T2), and then multiple timelines/series that use that bedrock as a launching off point. It's why Dark Fate doesn't bother me with certain elements as it would if it was the only third film that existed, because whatever happens, it's just another installment out of multiple installments for me.

(not unless your adapting the arcade version of AVP as it originally was supposed to be).

That beat 'em up?

How the heck would that even work narratively? Earth overrun by xenos, plucky four slaughter thousands of them? Like, okay, but how does that fit in with the series up to that which have always had a few yautja/xenos in a confined area (even "Aliens" is relatively limited in the amount of xenos on-screen).

At least Salvation tried something different. I think it really only fall apart with the Marcus sub-plot. Something, I think was not needed in the film.

So I like every Terminator movie bar T3, but Salvation takes the #5 spot for me. Marcus is simultaniously one of the film's strengths and also one of its weaknesses. Because on one hand, it's an interesting idea with him, conceptually. On the other, for a film that obstenibly stars John Connor, and is meant to show his journey from frontline fighter to leader of the Resistance, Marcus gets the lion's share of the screen time. Which isn't bad in of itself, but the result is that the movie spends most of its time on a character that's dead by the end of it, in a movie that has to factor in John's character arc, while also showing Kyle Reese.

Johnny Novgorod:

I don't think there's anything 'subtle' about Dr. Sleep. There's a RWBY poster in the kid's room,

God damn it, I can't get away from that show. :(

Hey Rooster Teeth. When's Nomad of Nowhere Season 2 coming out?

Read the 1993 script for AVP. You'll find it floating on the net somewhere. The Capcom arcade game was based off of that. It was supposed to have Arnie returning as Dutch with the fucking cyborg arm! How cool would have that to be seen on the big screen. Also, Xenos weren't taking over the entire Earth, just Los Angeles. The movie could have worked, but execs butting heads (dumb asses) prevented that for many years. You know how the rest of the story goes.

CoCage:

HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

Admittedly, I'm a big fan of a lot of Lovecraft's work, but still, I find calling him a 'hack' when compared to modern authors and filmmakers that were all objectively heavily influenced by him, a bit off. I get that he was a racist and had serious problems (not a big fan of the man, just of some of his works), but his ideas, and rapport with other authors at the time, helped sculpt modern horror.

As for the stories being actually scary, well... I'll totally admit that I've also never really been scared by Lovecraft's work, but I assume that times do change when it comes to what scares audiences - Victorian ghost stories are niche now, as an alternate example.

What's frustrating me at the moment is that I'm having trouble recalling any written story that truly scared me. I might come back to this and add in an example later, but I suspect said example will have extenuating circumstances that will need clarification.

the December King:

CoCage:

HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

Admittedly, I'm a big fan of a lot of Lovecraft's work, but still, I find calling him a 'hack' when compared to modern authors and filmmakers that were all objectively heavily influenced by him, a bit off. I get that he was a racist and had serious problems (not a big fan of the man, just of some of his works), but his ideas, and rapport with other authors at the time, helped sculpt modern horror.

As for the stories being actually scary, well... I'll totally admit that I've also never really been scared by Lovecraft's work, but I assume that times do change when it comes to what scares audiences - Victorian ghost stories are niche now, as an alternate example.

What's frustrating me at the moment is that I'm having trouble recalling any written story that truly scared me. I might come back to this and add in an example later, but I suspect said example will have extenuating circumstances that will need clarification.

We've talked before about this. Minus the whole "hack" thing. I am well aware they were all influenced by him. Hell, almost every horror/sci-fi artist, writer, manga/anime creator, or film maker was influenced by Lovecraft in some way. If not him, then Scott or Carpenter if we're referring to the anime/manga industry. The difference being most of them did his shtick better, and Lovercraft suffers from Seinfeld is Unfunny syndrome in addition to all of the other problems. As far as literature actually scaring me: Jurassic Park (The scene with Nedry is even more graphic than the film), The Mask of Red Death, some Goosebump books and Fear Street books, and Scary Stories. The sketches for the final one I've seen so many times that they don't do anything to me anymore.

CoCage:

the December King:

CoCage:

HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

Admittedly, I'm a big fan of a lot of Lovecraft's work, but still, I find calling him a 'hack' when compared to modern authors and filmmakers that were all objectively heavily influenced by him, a bit off. I get that he was a racist and had serious problems (not a big fan of the man, just of some of his works), but his ideas, and rapport with other authors at the time, helped sculpt modern horror.

As for the stories being actually scary, well... I'll totally admit that I've also never really been scared by Lovecraft's work, but I assume that times do change when it comes to what scares audiences - Victorian ghost stories are niche now, as an alternate example.

What's frustrating me at the moment is that I'm having trouble recalling any written story that truly scared me. I might come back to this and add in an example later, but I suspect said example will have extenuating circumstances that will need clarification.

We've talked before about this. Minus the whole "hack" thing. I am well aware they were all influenced by him. Hell, almost every horror/sci-fi artist, writer, manga/anime creator, or film maker was influenced by Lovecraft in some way. If not him, then Scott or Carpenter if we're referring to the anime/manga industry. The difference being most of them did his shtick better, and Lovercraft suffers from Seinfeld is Unfunny syndrome in addition to all of the other problems. As far as literature actually scaring me: Jurassic Park (The scene with Nedry is even more graphic than the film), The Mask of Red Death, some Goosebump books and Fear Street books, and Scary Stories. The sketches for the final one I've seen so many times that they don't do anything to me anymore.

... shit, I thought we had done this dance before!

I see where you're coming from; ignore me and carry on.

Hawki:

God damn it, I can't get away from that show. :(

I've seen that show mentioned online here and there, and maybe saw some posters in real life, but I have never actually seen an episode. What is it, besides an anime show? What genre is it? How does it stack up against others in it's genre? And is it something I should check out?
For reference, I tend to dislike the Shonen style (think Naruto-style shows) and my tastes run more towards the adult (non-porno) side like Cowboy Bebop, Ergo Proxy, Evangelion, etc.

CoCage:
HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

I'm Latino and I have zero qualms with HP, so that's that. I've read him extensively. If anything he comes across as a misanthrope more than a racist, someone with an extremely narrow window for empathy. Either way I can separate art from artist easier than I can separate Stephen King from mediocre writing, especially going a whole century back.

Knives Out
A whodunit in the vein of an Agatha Christie novel, written and directed by Rian Johnson. Johnson and his "subvert expectations" philosophy have become memes by now, and I didn't really care for The Last Jedi because of it, but damn if it doesn't work well with a whodunit. This means we know whodunit from the get-go, which means our attention is diverted to other puzzlers (who did what and why, times a dozen). Movie is built on a series of half-truths, basically. It was a lot of fun. In its irreverence and narrative deceitfulness it's way more of a proper Christie story than an actual adaptation, like Branagh's Orient Express a few years back.

Motherless Brooklyn
Edward Norton's directorial debut (?), a period piece film noir from a novel by Jonatham Lethem. Stars Norton as a PI with Tourette's. Alec Baldwin, Willem Dafoe and Bruce Willis in supporting roles. I can't put my finger on it but there's something off about the pace and the acting. Everybody seems to be on the same wavelength, speak the same language, and the plot is Big Sleep-levels of impossible to follow, which I guess is the point. The Tourette's is front and center the whole story but doesn't come into play other than singling out the lead with a freaky quirk. I enjoyed the old fashioned-ness of the whole thing but it's not a story that lives up to its own hype.

Johnny Novgorod:

CoCage:
HP Lovecraft is a hack. The hackiest of hacks. I find almost none of his stories scary at all. The heavy racism does not help. I'm a black guy here, so most of the main characters' throws my sympathy out of the window. The only story I actually liked was the Color of Outer Space (a story adapted kinda in Creepshow with Stephen King as the star). Other than that, I hate his stories. The motherfucker was self hating, white Supremacist, that threw a bitch fit in one of his stories because he found out his mother was Welsh. How fucking pathetic is that?! It does not help that likes of King, John Carpenter, Ridley Scott, and many others had far surpassed him in the mysterious monster(s)/alien/entity man was never meant to know or understand. Especially Carpenter with The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In the Mouth of Madness. AKA, the Apocalypse Trilogy.

I'm Latino and I have zero qualms with HP, so that's that. I've read him extensively. If anything he comes across as a misanthrope more than a racist, someone with an extremely narrow window for empathy. Either way I can separate art from artist easier than I can separate Stephen King from mediocre writing, especially going a whole century back.

More power to you then. I can separate art and artist, but a lot of the shit I described bleeds in to his work, so it is a problem for me. Him being a misanthropic is minor compared to all of the other flaws.

Zombies in a Sugar Cane Field
Beautiful movie. Presents itself as a documentary about a mysterious, long-lost film that has attained cult status within B-horror. It chronicles two journeys, covering the story of a zombie movie shot in flyover Argentina with a remarkable similitude to Night of the Living Dead - years before Romero's movie even began production - and one man's mission to uncover as many relics from that legendary shoot, up to and including the script to the lost movie. I love movies about movies and this one struck all the right notes of cinephile passion and myth-making/unraveling.

Johnny Novgorod:

The only loser is that shitty movie. 130 million dollars so far.

Well it's not my fault that the masses have no taste. :P

CoCage:

It was supposed to have Arnie returning as Dutch with the fucking cyborg arm! How cool would have that to be seen on the big screen.

Arnie with a cybernetic arm? Sure. See T2. Dutch with a cybernetic arm? Not so much.

The Alien and Predator franchises have operated mostly on the premise that less is more. In the case of Predator, it's a case of humans going up against foes that are superior physiologically and technologically. It's why the Predator suit at the end of the fourth film is so dumb IMO, because it's an example of how a child thinks. Let's have "kewl" showdown with our power armoured super-soldiers. And look, maybe I'm stuck in the old ways, but even if it was just confined to Los Angeles, if the film is anything like the game, it wouldn't be Alien or Predator as we knew it.

The AvP we got, while bog standard average, did at least conform to the "less is more" principle. Requiem, on the other hand, didn't (though that said, that film is terrible for more reasons than I can list right now).

twistedmic:

I've seen that show mentioned online here and there, and maybe saw some posters in real life, but I have never actually seen an episode. What is it, besides an anime show? What genre is it? How does it stack up against others in it's genre? And is it something I should check out?

I'm the wrong person to ask. I saw a few episodes and gave up.

I dislike RWBY, but it's admittedly dislike based in bias. Like, RWBY came along, Red vs. Blue emulated its over the top fighting style to its detriment (likely because Monty worked on both shows), and it's Rooster Teeth's flagship series right now, while I prefer their other series. But this isn't an objective appraisal.

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:

The only loser is that shitty movie. 130 million dollars so far.

Well it's not my fault that the masses have no taste. :P

CoCage:

It was supposed to have Arnie returning as Dutch with the fucking cyborg arm! How cool would have that to be seen on the big screen.

Arnie with a cybernetic arm? Sure. See T2. Dutch with a cybernetic arm? Not so much.

The Alien and Predator franchises have operated mostly on the premise that less is more. In the case of Predator, it's a case of humans going up against foes that are superior physiologically and technologically. It's why the Predator suit at the end of the fourth film is so dumb IMO, because it's an example of how a child thinks. Let's have "kewl" showdown with our power armoured super-soldiers. And look, maybe I'm stuck in the old ways, but even if it was just confined to Los Angeles, if the film is anything like the game, it wouldn't be Alien or Predator as we knew it.

The AvP we got, while bog standard average, did at least conform to the "less is more" principle. Requiem, on the other hand, didn't (though that said, that film is terrible for more reasons than I can list right now).

twistedmic:

I've seen that show mentioned online here and there, and maybe saw some posters in real life, but I have never actually seen an episode. What is it, besides an anime show? What genre is it? How does it stack up against others in it's genre? And is it something I should check out?

I'm the wrong person to ask. I saw a few episodes and gave up.

I dislike RWBY, but it's admittedly dislike based in bias. Like, RWBY came along, Red vs. Blue emulated its over the top fighting style to its detriment (likely because Monty worked on both shows), and it's Rooster Teeth's flagship series right now, while I prefer their other series. But this isn't an objective appraisal.

Speak for yourself. I would kill to see this on the big screen back in 1994. The movie would have had a cyborg ninja.

image

What could have been, man. What could have been.

The first AvP movie we got was just okay (the original concepts would have been much better). Even though Paul WS Anderson (all of the RE movies can go to hell) directed it, I got some enjoyment out of it. Plus, the black woman survives at the end, so that was a big bonus for 15 year old me back in 2004. I did not even see Requiem, because I knew it would be a waste of time. When all of the AvP games or comics done more justice or better with the franchise then any of the films, you know the film industry screwed up.

The masses have tastes...half of the time. People are just tired of regurgitating the same shit over and over again. Oh look, a slightly different robot apocalypse that is controller by not-Skynet. Whoop-dee-doo. Granted, the audience was part of the problem, when you hhave people like Spoony, hardcore Terminator fans, and casuals go overboard on the hate for Salvation, because it tried something different. Even though the studio spoiler twist(I got lucky I only saw the first trailer for Salvation that kept the twist hidden) just like Genysis, people overreacted. The only reason so many people look back fondly on Salvation now is because of worse movies, ignoring the drama that happened on and off the set, or ignorant of the drama that happened on set, and actually watch the movie and judge it on it's own merits.

CoCage:
The movie would have had a cyborg ninja.

The yautja are already cyborg ninjas (in terms of tropes). Do we need a human one?

Even though Paul WS Anderson (all of the RE movies can go to hell)

:(

so that was a big bonus for 15 year old me back in 2004. I did not even see Requiem, because I knew it would be a waste of time.

Oh hey, we're the same age. :)

When all of the AvP games or comics done more justice or better with the franchise then any of the films, you know the film industry screwed up.

I don't know about all of them per se, but then, of the "Xenopedia" universe, my interest has always been more in the 'Alien' side of the franchise rather than the 'Predator' one, let alone AvP. On the other hand, nothing I've seen has approached the lows of Requiem, so there is that.

And if you haven't seen Requiem, don't worry. I rarely say this about anything, but Requiem is a film with practically no redeeming value. Not only does it fail on every level of storytelling and filmmaking, but I kid you not, there's moments in the film where I felt physically ill watching the stuff on screen.

Hawki:

CoCage:
The movie would have had a cyborg ninja.

The yautja are already cyborg ninjas (in terms of tropes). Do we need a human one?

Even though Paul WS Anderson (all of the RE movies can go to hell)

:(

so that was a big bonus for 15 year old me back in 2004. I did not even see Requiem, because I knew it would be a waste of time.

Oh hey, we're the same age. :)

When all of the AvP games or comics done more justice or better with the franchise then any of the films, you know the film industry screwed up.

I don't know about all of them per se, but then, of the "Xenopedia" universe, my interest has always been more in the 'Alien' side of the franchise rather than the 'Predator' one, let alone AvP. On the other hand, nothing I've seen has approached the lows of Requiem, so there is that.

And if you haven't seen Requiem, don't worry. I rarely say this about anything, but Requiem is a film with practically no redeeming value. Not only does it fail on every level of storytelling and filmmaking, but I kid you not, there's moments in the film where I felt physically ill watching the stuff on screen.

1.The yautja barely count on the cyborg part any way. Most of their strength is natural, and the only thing cyber about them are the alien/futuristic weapons they use. Yes, a human cyborg ninja is needed. There a lot of Linn Kurosawa fans.

2. Sorry, but I hate the RE live action films. Alice became a God Mode Sue, and the series turned in to Resident Evil: Check Out My Hot Wife. They are all bad self insert fan ficsm made in to movies. George A. Romero's original script was closer to the games than any of the Anderson film. The only Anderson films I like are Mortal Kombat, AvP, and Event Horizon. Here's hoping James Wan take the reboot films in the right direction

3. Great to know we're the same age. Thank you.

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:

The only loser is that shitty movie. 130 million dollars so far.

Well it's not my fault that the masses have no taste.

I dunno, Joker did pretty well.

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