Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

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Thaluikhain:

Oh, another thing that bugs me. After their last team got killed off, they send another team in...which seems to 3 people this team (and some others that were going to hang around outside). They are wearing biohazard suits and have guns, but seemingly no other equipment, no reloads or anything. You want the second team to be bigger and better equipped than the first one.

Yeah. What's more, no-one tries to ask Alice what happened. Just "take her to testing, re-open the Hive, don't bother asking one of only two survivours as to what happened.

I mean, even without that, they presumably guessed that something had got out, since Matt was mutating, but nup, lightly armed grunts. In the novelization, one of the biohazard suited guys asks Cain why he's sending them in when One and his team failed? Why is he expecting them to succeed when Umbrella's best commando squad failed.

Onward. Hot DAMN did this movie exceed my expectations. I'll probably come back and expand upon that at some point.

Inseminoid, a 1981 British rip off of Alien.

A sketch by English comedian Peter Cook:

The main trouble with your story was that it lacks everything. You name it - it lacks it.

Replace "lacks" with "fails at". Except being somewhat creepy. Not in the "this is a creepy movie" sense, which can be a good thing, sure, but in the "what was with the people making this movie, did they have issues?" sense.

A boring and stupid bunch of bad actors are on an alien planet doing alien planet things, some die, one gets raped by an alien and then the rest die. Boringly and stupidly. Looks like they put a bit of time an effort into the alien rape scene, and didn't bother with the rest. Didn't care if anyone survived this film, cause they were trying to get themselves killed as stupidly and boringly as possible.

Onward

Pixars newest outing. These days Pixar's name isn't quite the seal of quality it used to be anymore. Two Cars sequels made sure of that. Onward is their newest outing and while it's not A-game Pixar it is, at the very least, B+-game Pixar. Onward is set in a world that started off as a Dungeons and Dragons style fantasy setting and then modernized to the point of being 90s California, more or less. Our main characters are a pair of elvish teenage brothers, timid Ian and overconfident Barley, played by MCU golden boys Tom Holland and Chris Pratt. On Ians sixteenth birthday their mother hands them a present from their father, who died shortly before Ian was born. A magical staff, a magical gem and a spell to briefly resurrect their father. The gem, however, is only enough to bring his lower half back from the dead so they go on a quest to find a second one.

It is what it sounds like, a cross between a fantasy adventure movie and a 90s buddy roadtrip movie. A very solid premise, really, and it being Pixar you can expect them to execute it competently. Which they did. The world Ian and Barley live in is a very fun one, high fantasy, but modern is a very underrated and very underused setting and Onwards depiction of Middle Earth, but also suburban California, while undeniably gimmicky, makes for a great backdrop to a story about brotherly love and growing up.

It's not quite up there with the studios best works. It's just a bit too predictable and it's missing that secret ingredient, that greater emotional resonance of Coco, Up, or Inside Out or the playful gee whiz kinetics Brad Bird brought to Incredibles and Ratatouille but while it may not be remembered as a highlight in Pixar's history it will most probably be remembered as a hit, rather than a miss. While you may see some of the jokes coming it does deliver that patented Pixar likeability and heartwarming, especially so in its very well executed ending.

PsychedelicDiamond:
Onward

Pixars newest outing. These days Pixar's name isn't quite the seal of quality it used to be anymore. Two Cars sequels made sure of that. Onward is their newest outing and while it's not A-game Pixar it is, at the very least, B+-game Pixar. Onward is set in a world that started off as a Dungeons and Dragons style fantasy setting and then modernized to the point of being 90s California, more or less. Our main characters are a pair of elvish teenage brothers, timid Ian and overconfident Barley, played by MCU golden boys Tom Holland and Chris Pratt. On Ians sixteenth birthday their mother hands them a present from their father, who died shortly before Ian was born. A magical staff, a magical gem and a spell to briefly resurrect their father. The gem, however, is only enough to bring his lower half back from the dead so they go on a quest to find a second one.

It is what it sounds like, a cross between a fantasy adventure movie and a 90s buddy roadtrip movie. A very solid premise, really, and it being Pixar you can expect them to execute it competently. Which they did. The world Ian and Barley live in is a very fun one, high fantasy, but modern is a very underrated and very underused setting and Onwards depiction of Middle Earth, but also suburban California, while undeniably gimmicky, makes for a great backdrop to a story about brotherly love and growing up.

It's not quite up there with the studios best works. It's just a bit too predictable and it's missing that secret ingredient, that greater emotional resonance of Coco, Up, or Inside Out or the playful gee whiz kinetics Brad Bird brought to Incredibles and Ratatouille but while it may not be remembered as a highlight in Pixar's history it will most probably be remembered as a hit, rather than a miss. While you may see some of the jokes coming it does deliver that patented Pixar likeability and heartwarming, especially so in its very well executed ending.

No, Cars was the break in the seal of approval. It's their worst movie by far. Car 2 was a whacky sidestep that at least provided something instead of the lacklustre first movie. It's criticising Virtue signallers, corporatists and race organisers who push their show ahead despite cars pretty much dying and doing nothing to figure out why. It's still not good, though. Cars 3 was the hand over, similar to Toy Story 4. I actually think they did it better in Cars 3, but the overall movie was better in TS4. Thus, I think they've been getting better over the years

trunkage:
No, Cars was the break in the seal of approval. It's their worst movie by far. Car 2 was a whacky sidestep that at least provided something instead of the lacklustre first movie. It's criticising Virtue signallers, corporatists and race organisers who push their show ahead despite cars pretty much dying and doing nothing to figure out why. It's still not good, though.

Even if I accept Cars 2 has deep themes, it's still doing it through Mater. Also, there's like, that one guy who promotes his own fuel, then sabotages his own fuel, so the cars will continue to rely on oil. Don't know about you, but that sounds needlessly convoluted. Cars 1, while a stock story, still executes that story decently. In fact, I like Cars one more than a number of other Pixar films, and not just Cars 2.

Thaluikhain:
Inseminoid, a 1981 British rip off of Alien.

A sketch by English comedian Peter Cook:

The main trouble with your story was that it lacks everything. You name it - it lacks it.

Replace "lacks" with "fails at". Except being somewhat creepy. Not in the "this is a creepy movie" sense, which can be a good thing, sure, but in the "what was with the people making this movie, did they have issues?" sense.

A boring and stupid bunch of bad actors are on an alien planet doing alien planet things, some die, one gets raped by an alien and then the rest die. Boringly and stupidly. Looks like they put a bit of time an effort into the alien rape scene, and didn't bother with the rest. Didn't care if anyone survived this film, cause they were trying to get themselves killed as stupidly and boringly as possible.

It's lazy trend chasing pure and simple. Something gets big and suddenly there's a bunch of similar works, all trying to cash in but very few if any of them bothering to put in the work and thus most of them flop and/or are forgotten.

I remember watching a movie years ago on the Sci-Fi channel(now SyFy) which was no shit, an awful attempt to copy Aliens/Alien(but with a griffen or something). I watched it kinda out of the corner of my eye while I was working on something else but I kept thinking "This keeps reminding me of Alien/Aliens but all it really does it make me want to watch the actual Alien/Aliens again".

Don't get me wrong, occasional an imitation can be something awesome in itself (How many people remember what Film Airplane was mocking or that it was even mocking a film?) but it's rare.

Life, the Jake Gyllenhaal (?) and Ryan Reynolds "Alien" knockoff nobody watched.
It's actually a really well made movie with some scenes that really hold up as tense and unsettling and gruesome. Even if it must eventually boil down to "Alien" shenanigans, it's certainly better than a lot of other "Alien" inspired tripe. That "Underwater" Kristen Stewart movie comes to mind.

Johnny Novgorod:
Life, the Jake Gyllenhaal (?) and Ryan Reynolds "Alien" knockoff nobody watched.
It's actually a really well made movie with some scenes that really hold up as tense and unsettling and gruesome. Even if it must eventually boil down to "Alien" shenanigans, it's certainly better than a lot of other "Alien" inspired tripe. That "Underwater" Kristen Stewart movie comes to mind.

I find that highly debatable. Life just felt like another Alien clone with not much going for it, the astronauts acting like total dumb asses (the space truckers from Alien were smarter and more sensible by comparison), and Calvin (the alien) being really over powered. It's well shot and show Ryan Reynolds can do a "serious" or dark movie, but I found Life mostly forgettable. I got more entertainment out of LILY CAT (anime film from the 80s). And that movie was another Alien clone, except it copied not only Alien, but The Thing (1982) too. That's a doozie.

CoCage:

Johnny Novgorod:
Life, the Jake Gyllenhaal (?) and Ryan Reynolds "Alien" knockoff nobody watched.
It's actually a really well made movie with some scenes that really hold up as tense and unsettling and gruesome. Even if it must eventually boil down to "Alien" shenanigans, it's certainly better than a lot of other "Alien" inspired tripe. That "Underwater" Kristen Stewart movie comes to mind.

I find that highly debatable. Life just felt like another Alien clone with not much going for it, the astronauts acting like total dumb asses (the space truckers from Alien were smarter and more sensible by comparison), and Calvin (the alien) being really over powered. It's well shot and show Ryan Reynolds can do a "serious" or dark movie, but I found Life mostly forgettable. I got more entertainment out of LILY CAT (anime film from the 80s). And that movie was another Alien clone, except it copied not only Alien, but The Thing (1982) too. That's a doozie.

When me and my wife watched Life our trajectory was something like: This seems good. This is actually kind of creepy. Alright, this is scary. How did Kevin survive that? Oh, Calvin found a way again. And again. This is just ridiculous now. At least it is almost over. [Ending twist happens] Aaaaaaand that ruined the entire movie and turned it into cornball.

Life's problem is, as you point out, that Calvin is so incredibly overpowered and develops new traits as demanded by the plot that all tension is just sucked out. As the viewer you soon realize that Calvin will not be caught, killed or tricked, because it will just exhibit a new trait or power to get it out of the situation (and be more dangerous than before). That the ending is hilariously over the top in its attempt at shock value is just another sprinkling of Mediocre on top of the Bad cake.

Birds of Prey: The Fantabulous Emancipation of one Harley Quinn

I wasn't too optimistic about this movie. An entire feature about the annoying comic relief from Suicide Squad that had been unceremoniously dumped in early February with fairly minimal marketing? Doesn't exactly inspire a lot of good will, to say the least, not in me and not in the general audience, which seems to have been fairly ambivalent about it. Turns out, Bird of Prey is actually a solid action movie, if a flawed one.

I think the best thing to be said about Bird of Prey is that it's not pretentious. It mostly foregoes soapy Marvel style character drama and heavyhanded DC style attempts at deeper themes in favour of blunt but mostly effective action and comedy. In a lot of ways it feels like a much better version of what the unwatchable Suicide Squad and the barely watchable Deadpool tried to be: cartoony, violent action comedies with a hint of punk, even if it's that slightly phony Zoomer approximation of punk, all neon lights and circus costumes. Parts of it actually invoke the campy Las Vegas fever dream Joel Schumacher turned Gotham City into, though, for better or for worse, it never goes quite as far visually. Ewan McGregor as the movies main villain, mob boss Roman Sionis, could certainly stand right next to Carrey's Riddler or Uma Thurman's Poison Ivy when it comes to maniacal overacting. He's a fittingly over the top villain for an over the top movie. Though part of me wonders whether an earlier draft of the script actually had the Joker as the villain and was meant to be more of a revenge story. Until the writers realized that no one likes Jared Leto as the Joker. Which, by the way, is another point in Birds of Prey's favour: He isn't in it.
When it comes to keeping the movie going the action choreography, done by some of the people behind the John Wick series, is doing a lot of the heavy lifting. The action sequences are all very well presented and very well staged. It does its best to compensate for the movies weirdly scatterbrained pacing. Flashback, flash forward, flash aside, it's some strangely hyperactive storytelling for what's a a very straight forward story. Basically, a bunch of people chasing a McGuffin (A diamond, if you really want to know) under the ownership of a round faced filipino girl named Cassandra. Among the not only the titular Harley Quinn and Roman Sionis but also police officer Rene Montoya, a mysterious assassin named Huntress and lounge singer Black Canary.

I have some issues with Harley Quinn as a character. The abusive relationship angle between her and the Joker is probably nothing that has a place in a movie with as light a tone as this one but that's effectively the one thing that makes her interesting. The fact that her madness, here too often played off as marketable quirkyness, is actually the result of deep trauma. You take away the implicit tragedy of a smart and talented doctor being brainwashed into a deranged criminal by an abusive psychopath, all you're left with is a screechy bimbo with a Fran Drescher accent. While the title of the movie may claim so, Birds of Prey does little to emancipate Harley, fantabulously or otherwise. Instead of being a violent, sexualised fantasy for the Joker, she's a violent, sexualised fantasy for the viewer. After Joker tried, with some success, to make a supervillain the center piece of a serious drama, it's a bit disheartening to see such a tragic character flanderized into what's a slightly more sympathetic female Deadpool.

There is a, in current movie discourse frequently ignored, difference between a feminist action movie like, for example, Aliens, the Kill Bill duology or Coralie Fargeat's promising debut Revenge, and an action movie that simply happens to have female lead characters like the New Star Wars trilogy, Captain Marvel or Alita: Battle Angel and Birds of Prey is definitely in the latter camp. This is not a judgement on its quality but at the same time it's something that deserves to be pointed out about a flick that has the word "emancipation" in its very title. For what it's worth, there's not much Birds of Prey is about. It's about a group of cute super waifus played by mostly conventionally attractive Hollywood actresses like Margot Robbie, Elizabeth Winstead and Jurnee Smollett-Bell (Rosie Perez's doing a legitimately pretty convincing turn as tough middle aged cop being the notable exception here) fighting evil mobsters while rock music plays. I'm not meaning to imply that's a bad thing, it's all very fun and colourful and well realized, but much like the dreadful Shazam or the decent Aquaman, it's one of the more conventional DC movies. I'm glad it wasn't worse but at the same time it could have been better.

PsychedelicDiamond:

There is a, in current movie discourse frequently ignored, difference between a feminist action movie like, for example, Aliens, the Kill Bill duology or Coralie Fargeat's promising debut Revenge, and an action movie that simply happens to have female lead characters like the New Star Wars trilogy, Captain Marvel or Alita: Battle Angel

What difference is there though?

Of your first set, I've only seen Aliens, while of the latter, seen all three. I don't really see much of a difference, unless you're including Aliens's motherhood subtext. If anything, Captain Marvel is the most feminist of the bunch, and even then it's either lip service (women not being allowed as combat pilots) or the gaslighting interpretation when Carol faces Yon Rogg.

Frankly, I'm over it. On the one hand, female-led films didn't suddenly pop into existence over the last few decades, but nor is every female-led film following the "feminist agenda."

This is not a judgement on its quality but at the same time it's something that deserves to be pointed out about a flick that has the word "emancipation" in its very title. For what it's worth, there's not much Birds of Prey is about.

I dunno, the whole 'emancipation' thing is core to Harley's character arc. It's called Birds of Prey, but make no mistake, she's the main protagonist. You could argue that all the Birds are emancipated as well, whether it be Dinah from Sionis, Renee from a corrupt police force, or Huntress from her family issues. Again, if anything, Birds is more 'feminist' than Aliens, but it's still subtext.

but much like the dreadful Shazam or the decent Aquaman, it's one of the more conventional DC movies. I'm glad it wasn't worse but at the same time it could have been better.

I think we're on opposite ends here. Shazam is my favourite DCEU movie, and the only genuinely good one IMO. Birds, however, lurks at the bottom - you can see the review I did of it earlier as to why.

Trauma Center

Straight-to-streaming garbage. Bruce Willis gets top billing but he's barely in the movie, and when he shows up he looks tired and miserable. Probably sounds like hyperbole but I've never seen him give as little shit as he does here. Production probably had him for one or two days, which would explain why he's rarely onscreen with anybody else and when he is I swear they're using stand-ins for the other 3 actors. I also caught a waft of Steven Seagal from the bit parts, which mostly cast hot chicks in improbable roles.

The movie is about a woman (Nicky Whelan) who witnesses the murder of a cop (Willis' partner), gets shot in the leg by the killers and then sent over to a hospital where Willis tells her to lie low in a sealed-off, quarantined section. The killers go after her and the movie is about her evading the two most incompetent crooked cops in the history of the genre. Supposedly they're after the bullet in her leg, which would give away their identities as cops, which is a tremendously stupid plot point. Why use your service gun in your drug deals in the first place? And you already riddled a cop and the dumpster behind him with bullets that, sure enough, are traced back to their service guns. So why fixate on this one bullet you fired at a witness who didn't actually see anything?

I also don't get what's the point of the Puerto Rico setting. The cast isn't Latino and the whole movie takes place in a nondescript hospital building. You could've shot it anywhere. I spent the whole movie looking for the one technicality that would've excused the location and couldn't find it, except that the signs inside the hospital are in Spanish. Was that it?

Uncorked. Hit home for me in that so many places I love shut down for no other reason than the parents retired and kids did not want to continue the family business. Even so, this movie introduced me to a world I did not know existed. Can someone really take a sip of wine and tell you all about what it is, when it was made and by who, where and under what conditions?

Just as a tangent, now the cinemas are shut it seems new movies are being released for streaming, so I thought I check them out.

The first one I looked at was UKP#16 for 48h rental. Er, fuck that!

A cinema ticket is about half that. I get that in many cases a streamed home movie will be watched by more than one person, but even still, that's horrendous. Distributors get about 40-50% of the ticket price in my country. If the streaming service is claiming a similar proportion of ticket sales to the cinemas, they are gouging us: we're not paying upkeep for a load of attendants, cleaners, projectionists, big screen and sound system, building maintenance etc. at home. If the distributors are taking a bigger cut, I still think that's eye-wateringly high.

Agema:
Just as a tangent, now the cinemas are shut it seems new movies are being released for streaming, so I thought I check them out.

The first one I looked at was UKP#16 for 48h rental. Er, fuck that!

A cinema ticket is about half that. I get that in many cases a streamed home movie will be watched by more than one person, but even still, that's horrendous. Distributors get about 40-50% of the ticket price in my country. If the streaming service is claiming a similar proportion of ticket sales to the cinemas, they are gouging us: we're not paying upkeep for a load of attendants, cleaners, projectionists, big screen and sound system, building maintenance etc. at home. If the distributors are taking a bigger cut, I still think that's eye-wateringly high.

Distributors oftentimes -- with big blockbusters usually -- take even up to 90% of the opening week-end ticket sales and the percentage starts to go down from there. Some of it is justified because the distributor does most of the marketing even the in-cinema stuff. But hell no for those VoD-rental prices. Let's see how much Viaplay charges... 18,99 euros for a VoD-rental. Or a digital copy of Bloodshot is 16,99 euros. Damn.

McElroy:
Distributors oftentimes -- with big blockbusters usually -- take even up to 90% of the opening week-end ticket sales and the percentage starts to go down from there. Some of it is justified because the distributor does most of the marketing even the in-cinema stuff. But hell no for those VoD-rental prices. Let's see how much Viaplay charges... 18,99 euros for a VoD-rental. Or a digital copy of Bloodshot is 16,99 euros. Damn.

Bought Bloodspot for $20 US. I have not watched as I hope to have a bunch of friends over to watch with me... once it is OK for friends to hang out again.

I can see movies following the same path as games. Release them at top $. Those that want it right now will pay. If you have 1/2 dozen pals with you to watch a new movie at home for $20... that is not a bad deal. It's a good deal. After 6 months, the price comes down. Wait longer and it is streaming on Netflix or other. Longer and it is on cable for those who have not yet cut it.

Theaters? They have real reason to be worried.

Gorfias:

McElroy:
Distributors oftentimes -- with big blockbusters usually -- take even up to 90% of the opening week-end ticket sales and the percentage starts to go down from there. Some of it is justified because the distributor does most of the marketing even the in-cinema stuff. But hell no for those VoD-rental prices. Let's see how much Viaplay charges... 18,99 euros for a VoD-rental. Or a digital copy of Bloodshot is 16,99 euros. Damn.

Bought Bloodspot for $20 US. I have not watched as I hope to have a bunch of friends over to watch with me... once it is OK for friends to hang out again.

I can see movies following the same path as games. Release them at top $. Those that want it right now will pay. If you have 1/2 dozen pals with you to watch a new movie at home for $20... that is not a bad deal. It's a good deal. After 6 months, the price comes down. Wait longer and it is streaming on Netflix or other. Longer and it is on cable for those who have not yet cut it.

Theaters? They have real reason to be worried.

Yeah well there is one thing movies will never have: always-online DRM enforcement like Denuvo. Everything leaks immediately with full quality options. Cinema business might shrink, yeah, but they have distinct advantages. Cinema-going will probably become more of an elitist pastime.

OT: Anyway this is just about the "best" time to spend time watching movies, but I haven't started yet.

McElroy:
Yeah well there is one thing movies will never have: always-online DRM enforcement like Denuvo. Everything leaks immediately with full quality options. Cinema business might shrink, yeah, but they have distinct advantages. Cinema-going will probably become more of an elitist pastime.

Starting new thread on your thoughts.

OT: Anyway this is just about the "best" time to spend time watching movies, but I haven't started yet.

Best action movie I've seen in a while I got from Amazon, John Wick 3. I got it in 4K and it is gorgeous to look at. If you are into this sort of thing and haven't seen it yet it is a treat.

McElroy:
Distributors oftentimes -- with big blockbusters usually -- take even up to 90% of the opening week-end ticket sales and the percentage starts to go down from there.

I'm not sure if that's true in the UK: different countries can have different practices and the big initial release is usually in the USA. Although lower distributor proportions in the UK may be just that the tax is higher in the UK than the USA - in terms of after-tax proportions they could be very similar.

The Operative: 6/10

Very convoluted movie about a female secret operative who gets "in too deep" in an operation in Tehran, Iran. It does that whole thing where it starts near the end, and the story is told through recollective exposition until we make it back to present time and it winds down to its conclusion. Entertaining enough watch; certainly kept me intrigued and wondering what was going on, mostly because following the nuances of the story takes some serious effort; everyone in the movie speaks about 12 languages and the director loves fast-paced, expositive conversations that change between English and subtitles at the pacing of a table tennis match, but it does tension and suspense really well. Pretty good overall, deserves a re-watch to hear/read the other halves of some of the more critical conversations, and that ending, my GOD, well... I won't spoil it for you.

Cowboys & Aliens: 8/10

I never wanted to watch this movie because the title suggested it was one of those modern, self-aware B-movies like "Sharknado" or something equally inane, but the gf insisted I'd like it, so we watched it, and I'll be damned, I DID like it. Much more respectable and well-made (directed by Spielberg, for God's sake) than the lazy title suggests, "respectable" in that it has a legit sci-fi premise, a star-studded cast that acts their asses off, and some really fun spectacle, something I would have loved to see in theaters. Premise? We're in the wild west, and our "man of little words" protagonist strolls into town inexplicably wearing a high-tech bracelet and no memory of who he is or where he's from, and bright lights in the sky reveal an other-worldly threat that's bigger than any "sheriff in town." It doesn't push any boundaries insofar as sci-fi movies go, but it nicely tows the peculiar line between western and alien monster flick. It's a comfortable watch that would have easily warranted a large popcorn had I not judged the book by its cover 9 years ago.

In Bloodshot Vin Diesel gets to flex some muscle once again. Sure it's derivative, but I kinda liked it for the things it tried to do well and mostly succeeded. For example there are a couple of good action scenes! One is much like the cyborg fighting in Alita or Elysium and is at least much better than the former in that regard. And it does a couple of slightly clever things to give a bit of a surprise to a movie formula everyone knows. Then there is the character of KT played by Mexican bombshell Eiza Gonz?lez who waltzes around like a model you hire to gym ads (y'know, no visible muscle except ass), and when she gets her lil' action scene we don't see her face even for a fraction of a second! The stuntwoman completely takes her over as she does the Black Widow routine. Rather cringey in my opinion, and so is the movie's comic relief. 6/10

I watched a couple of reviews of the film and apparently the trailer of the movie spoils it completely. I did not see the trailer, so the experience was better through that.

Brides of Blood. Another one of those "the people behind this have issues films", in this case naked women being eated by hideous monsters, with the implication of sexual stuff going on.

Also, everyone is really stupid and is not taking any reasonable steps to not get eated. The mutant plants looked pretty good for this sort of thing, though.

McElroy:
Vin Diesel gets to flex some muscle once again. Sure it's derivative, but I kinda liked it for the things it tried to do well and mostly succeeded. For example there are a couple of good action scenes! One is much like the cyborg fighting in Alita or Elysium and is at least much better than the former in that regard. And it does a couple of slightly clever things to give a bit of a surprise to a movie formula everyone knows. Then there is the character of KT played by Mexican bombshell Eiza Gonz?lez who waltzes around like a model you hire to gym ads (y'know, no visible muscle except ass), and when she gets her lil' action scene we don't see her face even for a fraction of a second! The stuntwoman completely takes her over as she does the Black Widow routine. Rather cringey in my opinion, and so is the movie's comic relief. 6/10

I watched a couple of reviews of the film and apparently the trailer of the movie spoils it completely. I did not see the trailer, so the experience was better through that.

I'm assuming you are writing of "Bloodshot", right? I watched the 1st 1/2 hour. Fun movie to watch while on my eliptical. 2 hour movie will last me 4 viewings :-)

It got poor reviews so my expectations are low. It is already exceeding them so far.

Gorfias:

McElroy:
snip

I'm assuming you are writing of "Bloodshot", right? I watched the 1st 1/2 hour. Fun movie to watch while on my eliptical. 2 hour movie will last me 4 viewings :-)

It got poor reviews so my expectations are low. It is already exceeding them so far.

Whoopsie, I'll edit that in. I wrote it in the new forums and copy-pasted it here but left the first line out.

I even checked out Angry Joe's review of the movie, but holy shit his "analysis" is so surface level it almost hurts.

An aggressively unfunny comedy starring Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler. I wish American comedies would stop banking so much on improv. I wish they would also stop asking me to pity well-to-do, suburban middle-class families who haven't had a care in the world until the movie started, especially when their one problem is in the vicity of "had plenty of money but also needs more money".

Missing Link

Generally like Laika stuff. Kubo, Caroline and Paranorman are pretty good movies

This one... I haven't finished. It's aggressively boring. This has no reason to exist. Maybe it'll change before the end but I don't care if I actually see it or not.

5/10. I'd prefer to watch...

Sonic

Jim Carey is fun but is over doing it a bit. The bucket list thing, which is pretty boring in most movies this happens in, in thankfully relegated to about 10 mins (looking at you Shazam and your filler nonsense.) Nothing stands out other than Carey

6/10 (so it's not that much better)

Superman: Red Son

Fantastic. Really enjoyed this one. Basically it's a 'what if' of Superman if he was born in the USSR instead of America. Story takes place somewhere in the height of the Cold War and Superman is the hero of 'the people'and it's not long until he tries to recreate Russia to his image after finding out about Stalin's more questionable 'solutions' for dissidence. Superman, having the most noble and purest of intentions, can't see how putting an 'end to suffering' also annihilates personal autonomy. It ends up in cities miniaturized in a snowglobe and opponents lobotomized.

Fantastical as the story is I really liked the clever analogies. It questions what it's worth to trade a little safety for individual liberties. Something that is espescially sharp in today's climate where societies are in an indefinite lockdown over a comparitavely benign virus with hard fought freedoms and privacy voluntarily surrendered that isn't easily revoked. It also puts an almost fourth wall breaking allegory on SJW-culture(now something of a previous world it seems) with Wonder Woman incessantly complaining about 'men' being the source of all evil and Supes literally saying ''not all men'' as a riposte on the stupidity of that claim.

When I saw JM DeMatteis in the credits I knew I was in for a treat. He also wrote Kraven the Hunt and Vermin ie the best Spiderman stories ever written. I like how he analyzes individual psychology within their sociological framework something you don't really expect in popular comic books(with children/teenagers being their prime demographic). Like the implications of Superman's hubris due to his inability to directly relate his godlike powers to the frailty of the common man. The movie really elaborates on that struggle and makes it the central story theme showing how vertical power structures(ie safety vs freedom) really work. He did a similar thing with the Vermin origin story in Spiderman that I was totally mesmerized by like over three decades ago. Here showing how childhood abuse infracts on the adult psyche to create opposing dualities within the same person. Again not something you expect in a Spiderman comic book.

JM DeMatteis still has that same writing brilliance that makes Superman: Red Son such a fantastic cartoon.

Suspiria (1977)

Nothing much to say about it. It's my third Dario Argento movie, not counting Demons (which he wrote and produced but didn't direct), which I think is still my favorite giallo movie. Haven't seen the American remake. This one is largely plotless and I'm not sure it's about anything, except the possibility that this one German dance academy may be haunted. I like giallo on the most superfitial level - the neon lightning, the icky effects, the silly overacting, the progrock soundtrack. But that's about it.

Suspiria (2018)

Probably the better movie. The first one is a product of its time: campy, pulpy, grotesque. This one is more reimagining than remake, as it adapts the movie in name and premise only. All you really need to know about the new version is that it's scored by Radiohead, meaning it broods and creeps. It's caught somewhere between the Yorgos Lanthimos/Jonathan Glazer ominous specter. I'll say this version is also more overstuffed, bordering on pretentious (much noise is made about the historical context of 1977 Berlin). And I'm not a big fan of the lead.

Brotherhood of Justice (1986)

Features Keanu Reeves joining a gang of idealistic criminals who wear masks for their public stunts and one of them wears a Nixon mask and does the little V & V "I'm not a crook!" pose and this was 5 years before Point Break AND NOBODY'S TALKING ABOUT IT. Actually I found a lonely blog make a comment about it but that's it.

Anyway this is just a shitty made-for-TV movie chasing the trend set by Rumble Fish, The Outsiders and other 80s gang scare flicks, except this one plays like a PSA morality play. Really only amusing for its before-they-were-famous appeal (Keanu, Kiefer Sutherland, Billy Zane) and some retrospective hilarity involving Lori Loughlin, who was complaining about how hard it is to get into college long before she got arrested for bribing the University of Southern California into admitting her daughters.

Been collecting various clips of Predator, Predator 2, The Predator, and their DVD extras.

They are still good, even the last one has its moments, and 2 needed more love than it got.

stroopwafel:
Superman: Red Son

Fantastic. Really enjoyed this one. Basically it's a 'what if' of Superman if he was born in the USSR instead of America. Story takes place somewhere in the height of the Cold War and Superman is the hero of 'the people'and it's not long until he tries to recreate Russia to his image after finding out about Stalin's more questionable 'solutions' for dissidence. Superman, having the most noble and purest of intentions, can't see how putting an 'end to suffering' also annihilates personal autonomy. It ends up in cities miniaturized in a snowglobe and opponents lobotomized.

Fantastical as the story is I really liked the clever analogies. It questions what it's worth to trade a little safety for individual liberties. Something that is espescially sharp in today's climate where societies are in an indefinite lockdown over a comparitavely benign virus with hard fought freedoms and privacy voluntarily surrendered that isn't easily revoked. It also puts an almost fourth wall breaking allegory on SJW-culture(now something of a previous world it seems) with Wonder Woman incessantly complaining about 'men' being the source of all evil and Supes literally saying ''not all men'' as a riposte on the stupidity of that claim.

When I saw JM DeMatteis in the credits I knew I was in for a treat. He also wrote Kraven the Hunt and Vermin ie the best Spiderman stories ever written. I like how he analyzes individual psychology within their sociological framework something you don't really expect in popular comic books(with children/teenagers being their prime demographic). Like the implications of Superman's hubris due to his inability to directly relate his godlike powers to the frailty of the common man. The movie really elaborates on that struggle and makes it the central story theme showing how vertical power structures(ie safety vs freedom) really work. He did a similar thing with the Vermin origin story in Spiderman that I was totally mesmerized by like over three decades ago. Here showing how childhood abuse infracts on the adult psyche to create opposing dualities within the same person. Again not something you expect in a Spiderman comic book.

JM DeMatteis still has that same writing brilliance that makes Superman: Red Son such a fantastic cartoon.

Did it had a very.....interesting ending?

I read the comic and it had quite the ending.

saint of m:
Been collecting various clips of Predator, Predator 2, The Predator, and their DVD extras.

They are still good, even the last one has its moments, and 2 needed more love than it got.

Collecting clips?

Anyway, my ranking of the Predator films goes Predator>The Predator>Predators>Predator 2. That said, the only one I dislike is Predator 2, and I can't remember why The Predator itself is so high, so...

Samtemdo8:

Did it had a very.....interesting ending?

I read the comic and it had quite the ending.

Ehmmm..not really? The cartoon made me interested in the comic though.

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