Discuss and Rate the Last Thing You Watched (non-movies)

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Dalisclock:
This kinda reminds me of how I feel about people who apparently really love the idea of the post apocalypse. Not just as a setting for the story and character potential, but those wierdos who apparently relish the idea of society collapsing so they can be free to do what they want unconstrained by rules and regulations and such. Or maybe just want the government to collapse for the "Libertarian Paradise" or some such bullshit.

Because they somehow assume They'll be the ones to survive and thrive, rather then think about the misery and ramifications of services and supplies being cut off, possibly forever and how that effects people.People who just assume they'll go live in the local walmart or the mall or some such because they saw it in a film, or that they could totally learn to live off the land given a few weeks because wilderness survival and farming is easy.

Not to mention the idea of power vacuums that would be caused by the government ceasing to exist in any meaningful way.

Granted, most fiction really doesn't bother to show this kind of shit. How gas has a shelf life of like a year, how society is based on integrated and vast supply chains, how much of what we do now is networked and computerized, etc. So people just don't even think about it.

God, I remember how cool some of my friends thought it would be to live in the post apocalypse. And I remember looking at them with side eye. We're talking hard stereotypical nerds and geeks here. Gym was the bane of their existence in high school. Never put on an ounce of muscle in the entire time we've known each other. But they suddenly feel that when the time came, they would be able to outrun a horde of zombies while doing perfect headshots all the time.. and never seeing a gun up close.

And I'm SO GLAD SOMEONE TALKS ABOUT GAS SHELF LIFE. In Jurassic World, where they took a jeep from the old abandoned park (the jeep covered in uncontrolled plant growth, fixed it up, and drove it off into a park. Seriously?

Thaluikhain:

Dalisclock:
This kinda reminds me of how I feel about people who apparently really love the idea of the post apocalypse. Not just as a setting for the story and character potential, but those wierdos who apparently relish the idea of society collapsing so they can be free to do what they want unconstrained by rules and regulations and such. Or maybe just want the government to collapse for the "Libertarian Paradise" or some such bullshit.

Argh, yes.

Now, fair enough for the ones who've got a bunker and 20 different AR-15s that they've customised themselves and they are always doing paramilitary training (of which there's a lot available in the US). That's taking it seriously and being honest, at least.

And rich enough to be able to buy many more AR-15s than you need.

As an aside, apparently once a Dirty Harry film came out, people suddenly would buy .44 magnum revolvers, and then suddenly there'd be second hand ones for sale a month later once people realised that there's a lot of recoil associated with the most powerful handgun in the world (even if it technically wasn't).

I can admit hypocrisy when I say a few of those guys scare me. I know to others I'm just a hardcore paramilitary class away from looking exactly like those people, but what can I say, I'm in my mind and I know I truly just want to be self reliant if horrible things come to pass.

Some of those people want horrible things to come to pass. Not all, but some. Those people worry the hell out of me.

ObsidianJones:

God, I remember how cool some of my friends thought it would be to live in the post apocalypse. And I remember looking at them with side eye. We're talking hard stereotypical nerds and geeks here. Gym was the bane of their existence in high school. Never put on an ounce of muscle in the entire time we've known each other. But they suddenly feel that when the time came, they would be able to outrun a horde of zombies while doing perfect headshots all the time.. and never seeing a gun up close.

I worked recruiting for the US Navy a couple years back(and yes, it can be brutal). You'd be shocked(or maybe not) how many people say they want to be a Navy SEAL and apparently believe its realistic on a short timeline(as opposed to, I'm gonna spend a year or so doing a lot of physical training first). Dudes who can't even run a mile and half without falling over from exhaustion or do 50 pushups in a row.

But man, they could totally be a commando. So yeah, I see the same kind of thing in the wanna-be apocolypse survivors.

The Great Martian War 1913-1917, a mockumentary based on War of the Worlds happening instead of WW1.

They put a lot of effort into making it look like a somewhat over the top historical documentary, some nice historical touches there, but a lot of flat out stupid stupid that annoys me. Yes, in the real world, bolt action rifles with bayonets were widely used in that time period, you don't keep making them to fight 20 foot tall martian war machines. Now, sure, the original footage you are editing (and that's a bit murky as well) has real world stuff in it, of course, but nothing stopping you from getting some people in period costumes holding large calibre rifles and reducing the image quality.

ObsidianJones:
I can admit hypocrisy when I say a few of those guys scare me. I know to others I'm just a hardcore paramilitary class away from looking exactly like those people, but what can I say, I'm in my mind and I know I truly just want to be self reliant if horrible things come to pass.

Some of those people want horrible things to come to pass. Not all, but some. Those people worry the hell out of me.

Yup...I've got a youtube video paused in another tab that's by a survival teacher talking about how to make a fire in the rain, I definitely agree about increasing one's skills base for that sort of thing, but the wannabe straight to dvd dystopian action heroes...yeah, no. Same as the people that get a gun because they want someone scary to break into their house to kill.

Not to mention, in most dystopian fiction, it's certain types of people that get to be hardcore survivor types, a lot of demographics just don't exist anymore, which may or may not be part of the appeal.

True Detective Season 3

From what I haven't forgotten, it's decent. It goes weirdly cookie-cutter near the end. Why did Amelia ever fall for Wayne? Physicality only, I guess.

Dalisclock:

This kinda reminds me of how I feel about people who apparently really love the idea of the post apocalypse. Not just as a setting for the story and character potential, but those wierdos who apparently relish the idea of society collapsing so they can be free to do what they want unconstrained by rules and regulations and such. Or maybe just want the government to collapse for the "Libertarian Paradise" or some such bullshit.

It's quite simple, really. In the post-apocalypse only survival matters. No complexities of modern life to care about. Very much romanticized, but a lot of people yearn for a simpler life. Sometimes it sucks to be a modern person, soft and dependent.

Watchmen, the television show.

Damon Lindelof has been one of the more distinguished voices in American television for a while predating the more recent era of creator driven television by almost a decade and while it's debatable whether he is or has ever been a unique enough voice to justify his omnipresence in Hollywood it's undeniable that he has quite a bit of prestige. That might be the reason why he was chosen to spearhead a follow up to the massively influential and critically acclaimed graphic novel Watchmen, originally by Alan Moore, an author famously dismissive of all adaptations of his work. Lindelof's Watchmen is most definitely a project that aims high bit I'm not sure what it's aiming at, exactly.

For what it's worth, the graphic novel isn't exactly the timeless masterpiece it's sometimes made out to be, both its political commentary and it's genre commentary are a product of the 80s. One that has stood the test of time, sure, but both superheroes and politics have gone through various changes ever since the novel came out and Zack Snyder's late 00s adaptation, while well realized, didn't present much of a case for how Watchmen can fit into the new millenium.

Lindelof sure tries his hardest to drag the property into the 21st century kicking and screaming. Robert Redford is the president of the United States, a racist militia is terrorising the country, police are now wearing masks to protect themselves from assault, Vietnam is the 51st state... Ocassionally it feels like the show can offer pertinent social commentary but I feel like most of the time it's just being cute. Which is really what it comes down to,Watchmen gestures towards our current cultural anxieties but it has very little in terms of coherent commentary on them. It certainly has moments of being clever and witty but it's never exactly insightful.

The plot is not bad, not when it comes down to it, it's realitively tight, relatively unpredictable, follows a few compelling characters both old and new, standouts including Jeremy Iron's refreshingly eccentric take on an elderly Adrian Veidt and Tim Blake Nelson as drawling vigilante Looking Glass, and doesn't overstay its welcome wrapping up in 9 relatively well paced episodes.

I'm sure some people will consider HBOs Watchmen a much needed modernization of the classic comic book and I do respect a lot of its bolder decisions but now that it has ended I can't help but wonder if there was a greater point to it. What is Watchmen in 2019? A quirky dystopia? A parable about the nature of power? A liberal manifesto? A work of very well made fanfiction? An epilogue to a story that never felt like it needed one? It sure tries to be all of those things but it still struggles to justify its own existence. It was a wild ride for sure, sometimes even a fun one, but it doesn't manage to present a case for why the novel that was never meant to be a franchise has now become a franchise.

McElroy:

Dalisclock:

This kinda reminds me of how I feel about people who apparently really love the idea of the post apocalypse. Not just as a setting for the story and character potential, but those wierdos who apparently relish the idea of society collapsing so they can be free to do what they want unconstrained by rules and regulations and such. Or maybe just want the government to collapse for the "Libertarian Paradise" or some such bullshit.

It's quite simple, really. In the post-apocalypse only survival matters. No complexities of modern life to care about. Very much romanticized, but a lot of people yearn for a simpler life. Sometimes it sucks to be a modern person, soft and dependent.

I mean, I get that. I just notice a lot of the people who apparently want this "Survival of the fittest" scenario are likely going to be the ones least likely to actually do so. People who complain when their internet goes out or their air conditioning stops working.

Then again, people romanticize about being farmers for the "Simple life" and most of them have no idea how tough farming actually is. Hell, go ask a bunch of farmers in the midwest who lost half their crop yields this year from flooding how much fun they're having, or whose soybeans are rotting unsold because the chinese are looking for different markets due to tariffs.

McElroy:
It's quite simple, really. In the post-apocalypse only survival matters. No complexities of modern life to care about. Very much romanticized, but a lot of people yearn for a simpler life. Sometimes it sucks to be a modern person, soft and dependent.

There's that, but I think a lot of people don't differentiate between "like this fiction work" and "want to live there". Stephanie Meyer apparently said she wants to live in the Mortal Instruments world, where one mistake by a group of angsty teens dooms the world. Any number of people want to go to Hogwarts, and bad stuff happens there every book, especially the last one.

Dalisclock:
Then again, people romanticize about being farmers for the "Simple life" and most of them have no idea how tough farming actually is. Hell, go ask a bunch of farmers in the midwest who lost half their crop yields this year from flooding how much fun they're having, or whose soybeans are rotting unsold because the chinese are looking for different markets due to tariffs.

Not to mention, if someone really wanted to be a farmer, they don't have to wait for the apocalypse, there's farms and farmers right now.

Thaluikhain:
Any number of people want to go to Hogwarts, and bad stuff happens there every book, especially the last one.

Well, to be fair, bad stuff only happens to the protagonists. Your average student is probably going to go through the year commenting "hey, did you hear what that Potter guy did?"

Though on the other hand, Hogwarts does seem to be a bit lax when it comes to student safety, to put it mildly.

Thaluikhain:

McElroy:
It's quite simple, really. In the post-apocalypse only survival matters. No complexities of modern life to care about. Very much romanticized, but a lot of people yearn for a simpler life. Sometimes it sucks to be a modern person, soft and dependent.

There's that, but I think a lot of people don't differentiate between "like this fiction work" and "want to live there".

I think people can separate fantasy from reality. A fictional world is already pretty good if the reader/audience can picture themselves in there. Another idea tying to why zombie apocalypses are so overdone: It's a good quality to be able to build an engaging world for your readers/audience, and now when it's known that a lot of people gravitate towards certain elements it reveals a lack of creativity to include them every time.

PsychedelicDiamond:
Watchmen, the television show.

For what it's worth, the graphic novel isn't exactly the timeless masterpiece it's sometimes made out to be, both its political commentary and it's genre commentary are a product of the 80s. One that has stood the test of time, sure, but both superheroes and politics have gone through various changes ever since the novel came out and Zack Snyder's late 00s adaptation, while well realized, didn't present much of a case for how Watchmen can fit into the new millenium.

Watchmen gestures towards our current cultural anxieties but it has very little in terms of coherent commentary on them.

I'm sure some people will consider HBOs Watchmen a much needed modernization of the classic comic book and I do respect a lot of its bolder decisions but now that it has ended I can't help but wonder if there was a greater point to it. What is Watchmen in 2019? A quirky dystopia? A parable about the nature of power? A liberal manifesto? A work of very well made fanfiction? An epilogue to a story that never felt like it needed one? It sure tries to be all of those things but it still struggles to justify its own existence. It was a wild ride for sure, sometimes even a fun one, but it doesn't manage to present a case for why the novel that was never meant to be a franchise has now become a franchise.

I definitely have to disagree as the Watchmen movie fits amazingly into current times (I haven't read the comic, only watched a Youtube video summarizing it). I love the change to the ending the movie made as it basically changes the commentary on humanity from basically "humans can be good if they work together against a common threat" to "humans are only good in the face of a threatening god", which makes Watchmen thematically the darkest superhero movie ever made. Of course, it also functions as commentary on superheroes and superheroes are probably bigger than they've ever been in pop culture. The show IMO basically morphs the message into only a god can fix race issues as something like a government program like the Refordations couldn't and really only someone with god-like power (assuming the ending is what you think it is) could have the ability to somehow equal out the immense disadvantages from systemic racism over the 200+ years in America.

Arrow season 6/7/8

I've left this show. It was getting a bit much. But Crisis on Infinite Earth sounds pretty cool, so I'm catching up.

Season 6 was great. Felt like season 3 of Daredevil. It recaptured what I thought was great about Arrow. Taking the focus away from world destruction and on manipulating various factions was great,

Season 7 was back to the old problems. Vendettas for perceived slights. Utterly silly family nonsense right out of days of ours lives. The flash towards were the exact reason why I dislike Star Wars. The only saviour of the universe is a person who is related to a certain bloodline. Luke being born to save the universe is bollocks. I did find the whole prison segment interesting

Season 8. Collectathon. Treasure hunt. This is always a bad. See also last season of Final Space. Actually, Endgame was very similar but I feel like the McGuffins had their own traits. Similarly, the whole season is a nostalgia trip like Endgame, which has been generally okay, if sometimes forced.

Watchmen show
I had similar problems with this as the movie, About half way through, the movie/show stops and does flashbacks. A lot of them. In fact, at the 50% point, you realise they only have 15 mins of story left and they are just stringing it out to pad the run time. (45 mins for the show). If I remember correctly, this happened in the comics too.

I liked the investigation of legacy. That the average white person can looking at a common history and see that they are driving much of society. Many inventions come from white people, as well as societal norms.. But similarly, an African American can see their legacy as non-existent due to circumstances out of their, and their ancestors, control. Which, you know, triggered a bunch of people

But, I'd agree with Psychedelic Diamond. Why was this even part of the Watchmen franchise? Lindelof has already stated that this might be a one and down series. Which is unsatisfiimg, Mirror man and slippery dude have much more room to be fleshed out. I don't know why either of them needed to be there. Angela was just there to receive an egg and didn't drive much of the plot. If She taken out, how much would have the plot changed. Certainly, the first date episode, but much else? Things happened and some of the main character didn't make choices,

Also, I want more Reznor soundtracks

Dragon Prince Season 3

This season wraps up the current arc of getting the baby dragon to his mom and dealing with a number of plot threads the series had been working for a while. The finale was nicely done and if it ends up being the last episode/final season, at least it's a good note to go out on. There are apparently 4 more seasons planned(1 for each type of magic, including Dark magic) and it would be interesting to see where they go from here.

It also looks like the show finally gave some more implications about the backstory of the human expulsion from the eastern half of the continent, though the picture is still hazy what exactly was going on. I can definitely see why the elves are so touchy about the Dark Magic thing.

The Witcher

I'm about 3 episodes in so not quite halfway finished but so far it's pretty good. It generally tracks with what I liked about the games and Cavill is doing a good job of channeling his game counterpart in his depiction. I do have to question some of the editing decisions in the 3rd episode, notably the two scenes of screaming women alternating in the climax and exactly why it was done this way. I also question exactly the Sorceress Lodge is looking for in their new recruits considering the price of failing out and the fact Yen somehow managed to avoid that fate and even graduate.

Looking forward to seeing the rest of the series when I get some more time this weekend.

The Mandalorian

You know, it's alright. I'd probably be a lot harsher on it if the last movie had been less of a trainwreck but as it is, it's the best Star Wars production we're gonna get this year and we should cherish it. It's a very straight forward western riff about a mercenary kidnapping a child for the remnants of the Empire, developing an emotional connection and deciding to protect it. That's just about all there is. There are a few episodic stories that provide some insight into the state of the galaxy right after the war but nothing terribly surprising or terribly creative.

But it's fine, it really is. It captures the visuals of the Original Trilogy quite nicely, and... look, about 70 % of Disney's Star Wars consists of things fans of the Original Trilogy can point to and scream "I recognize this!" and Mandalorian is no different. There's Jawas and Tattooine and Twi'leks and that one kind of robots. You know. Star Wars stuff. The characters are fairly simply but decently likeable, Pedro Pascal as the eponymous bounty hunter does a believable enough quiet gunslinger, Werner Herzog has what's basically a glorified cameo as an imperial loyalist, Nick Nolte plays an elderly alien on a desert planet and does an actually very compelling job. The less said about some of the other supporting actors the better. Martial Artist Gina Garano sure looks nice but a gifted thespian, she isn't and let's not even talk about whatever the hell Natalia Tena thought she was doing there.

Basically, it's a straight forward Star Wars serial. Probably a pretty good callback to the type of show that inspired Star Wars in the first place, honestly. It's good, predictable fun. If you consider subscribing to Disney+ just to see it, don't. It's not worth it. But if you want to check it out through other means, go ahead. It's the best Star Wars related thing you're gonna see this year and, you know, maybe the series future is on the small screen. Mandalorian makes a decent case for it.

Sense 8 (Season 1)

Another pair of acclaimed film directors to venture into television or, rather, streaming, are Lana and Lily Wachowski, the two sisters behind Matrix and some really good shit you have, statistically speaking, most likely not seen, like Speed Racer, Jupiter Ascending and Cloud Atlas, which is most definitely up there with my favourite movies of the past decade.

So what is Sense 8 about? Well, it's about 8 people, all over the world, who are somehow telepathically linked. A hacker in San Francisco, a police officer in Chicago, a martial artist in Korea, an actor in Mexico, a thief in Germany,a DJ in London, a bus driver in Nairobi and a bride in India. The nature of that connection is the shows central mystery, though one it seems in no particular hurry to explore, not in its first season, anyway. Is there a shady organization trying to hunt them down? Sure, but the show puts all of that on the back burner to focus on these characters personal lifes.

If there is one thing to be said about Sense 8, and this might sound a bit bitter, is that it feels like a relic from a slightly better world. The computer specialist from San Francisco is a trans woman in a lesbian relationship. The Mexican actor is gay. The show never treats these characters with anything other than compassion. It has a positive portrayal of human sexuality that is very rare in American television, one that doesn't feel voyeuristic in the way sex in media often does but rather intimate and uplifting. The Wachowskis work seems to have fallen out of favour with the wider audience, which is sad, because there is something to it that feels very lacking in mainstream cinema. There is a sincere humanism that informs their productions and while I would have wished for a stronger overarching plot in the first season of Sense 8 the focus on individual character arcs comes from a place of genuine sympathy with their personal struggles.

Sense 8 is not the most tightly written or the most stylishly directed work of the sisters but it provides a strong argument for why we need their directorial voice more than ever. It's a bold statement on human connection beyond nation, gender and sexuality. Sense 8 is two seasons long and I don't know whether the show will tie itself together into something greater than the sum of its parts but so far even the sum of those parts alone is quite enjoyable.gotta be honest, I'd much rather see more of this than another Matrix sequel.

Forensic files

I can't get away with nothing

"Hizzonner the Penguin" and "Dizzoner the Penguin", from the 1960's live action Batman series.

It seems very unrealistic to have a rich criminal run for election (using cheap showmanship rather than addressing real issues and hoping to install over the top criminals in the government if he wins) when they are played by someone cool like Burgess Meredith as the Penguin.

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