Discuss and Rate the Last Thing You Watched (non-movies)

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Neurotic Void Melody:
The Boiz Boys
Went into this with the main impression of "who watches the watchmen??" And came out of it instead with an "ooh, that scratched the itch Brightburn couldn't figure out."

(SNIPped the rest but kept this bit so you knew what I was quoting)

This is an excellent review and I agree wholeheartedly. Well done that flesh being!

Voltron: Legendary Defender: Season 5 (3/5)

After the worst season in season 4, we get the best season in season 5. But again, that isn't the same as being "good."

Come to think of it, season 5 is really just more of the same of season 3 - Galra Empire fractures because of Zarkon's death/incapacitation, cue Lotor filling the vacuum, cue the pretty pretty explosions. Season 4 has Zarkon come back, cue more pretty pretty explosions. Season 5 has Zarkon outright die, proving two things. One, VLD can almost out DBZ DBZ. Two, Zarkon is a boring antagonist. Just because he's got an interesting backstory doesn't make the character himself interesting when his motivations can be boiled down to "power! Unlimited power!" That the empire fragments upon his death is more interesting than Zarkon himself. But on the subject of Lotor, I know I've been spoiled as to his fate, but seriously, who, watching season 5, believed that he wouldn't go bad? He wants quintessence this, quintessence that, and he spends more time doing that than securing the throne. FFS, even the characters point it out. But not Keith. Poor Keith. The show seems to have forgotten he existed at this point. Seriously, no idea how Klance became a thing at this point when we've gone a whole two seasons without them interacting, while LancexAllura is developed over time. I mean, cliche, sure, but least it makes sense.

Oh, and Pidge's dad is saved. Like her brother. Because God forbid a protagonist dies, or experiences loss. But hey, explosions, and plot revelations we can see coming a galaxy away...yay...

So, that's VLD. Best of the bunch, but yet to be "good."

Breaking Bad

One of these shows I've always been meaning to get around to and now finally did. It was mostly really good. Now, mind you, I say "mostly" because I felt that the series at its most consistent in the first two seasons and hit its peak, as a thriller at the very least, when Walter and Jesse were held prisoner by Tuco in the second season but both as a character study and as a story about organized crime it it remained enjoyable all the way throughout, carried by a consistently fantastic performance by Cranston and a steady influx of mostly very well written side characters.

It's not exactly realistic and I doubt it's trying to be, it has that theatric "Scarface" attitude towards its depictions of the American drug trade but while it"s not very realistic it is consistently believable in its version of New Mexico's underworld, even if characters like Saul Goodman, Gus Fring, Mike Ehrmantraut or even what Walter himself eventually becomes are very much the type of over the top archetypes you tend to see in crime fiction.

If anything there seems to be kind of a meta story to the series of how a grounded world with relatively grounded characters eventually morphing into more and more of a potboiler gangster story (most exemplary of that Hank turning from an abrasive asshole cop into a heroic detective) but simply taken at face value it's... fun, yes. Arcs like the Tuco kidnapping, the assassination of Gus Fring or the entire last season about the peak and eventual fall of Walters career as a criminal all made for a very engaging watch.

So, haven't had time to post reviews, so going to do a bunch together:

-Climate Change: The Facts (3/5)

Facts that I already knew. Far more interested in solutions at this point.

-My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic: Season 2 (4/5)

The season where the show found its groove.

-Voltron: Legendary Defender: Season 6 (4/5)

The season where the show finally got good. Sort of.

Hawki:

-Climate Change: The Facts (3/5)

Facts that I already knew. Far more interested in solutions at this point.

Well, if these facts were well know, we could focus on solutions instead of wasting time and money on 'proving it.'

trunkage:

Hawki:

-Climate Change: The Facts (3/5)

Facts that I already knew. Far more interested in solutions at this point.

Well, if these facts were well know, we could focus on solutions instead of wasting time and money on 'proving it.'

I'm not worried about proving it now. If anything, that's one of the few glimmers of hope that climate change denialists have become well and truly fringe.

Finished Neon Genesis Evangelion and the End of Evangelion film.

So after watching both like 3 or so times by now over the last decade or so, I think I finally understand more or less everything that was going on(even in the incredibly introspective final 2 eps). That being said, I'd kinda forgotten just how goddamn wierd and dense it gets near the end. Especially when the religious symbolism gets slathered over everything in the movie and SEELE goes from vague grousing about scenarios and whatnot to weird cultist speak and chanting.

Also, one has to wonder if Japan has something against Mental Healthcare or just NERV doesn't run psych evals on, well, anyone who works there, because it's damn clear that all the main characters should be in therapy/on meds by the end, if not outright relieved of duty. "Asuka, are you clearly having a mental breakdown? Tough. Back in the Eva you go to face yet another terrifying abomination".

Also Invader Zim: Enter the Florpus. It was entertaining, but it's not quite the same anymore.

Hawki:

trunkage:

Hawki:

-Climate Change: The Facts (3/5)

Facts that I already knew. Far more interested in solutions at this point.

Well, if these facts were well know, we could focus on solutions instead of wasting time and money on 'proving it.'

I'm not worried about proving it now. If anything, that's one of the few glimmers of hope that climate change denialists have become well and truly fringe.

Other then getting elected President of the US, you mean.

Camp Camp: Season 3 (3/5)

If I had to rank the seasons of Camp Camp at this point, it would go 1>3>2. That said, neither of those next two seasons have managed to match the first for emotional impact, though season 3 does recapture some of the original essence. Key word being "some," bust CCS3 feels like a hybrid of the two seasons that came before it. It captures some of the heart of season 1, but also utilizes the same foul-mouth stuff and 'zanniness' of season 2. At this point, the show's starting to resemble South Park, and even though I like South Park, I don't really mean that in a good way.

Still, at the very least, season 3 has an overarching plot, namely saving the camp. Yep, that's right, turns out Max might actually prefer staying in the camp now, regardless of how trite that is at character development. I know, I know, season 1 ended with him making fences with David, but not to the extent that his personality changed. Yep, I'm complaining about character development occurring, and I'm freaked out like you are.

So, CC s 3 is okay. But it hasn't recaptured the magic of season 1, and I don't think the show ever will, nor do I think it wants to. Which is fine, of course - the show can go in whatever direction it likes. But it's not a direction I'm too fond of.

Dalisclock:
Also, one has to wonder if Japan has something against Mental Healthcare or just NERV doesn't run psych evals on, well, anyone who works there, because it's damn clear that all the main characters should be in therapy/on meds by the end, if not outright relieved of duty. "Asuka, are you clearly having a mental breakdown? Tough. Back in the Eva you go to face yet another terrifying abomination".

That never really comes across in their work though. As fucked up as Misato and Ritsuko are they are very professional when it comes to their job. I think that's deliberate to show the contrast between to how they present themselves and how they really are deep down. Their character design add to this as well, since from the outside all of them look like nice wholesome individuals, with the exception of maybe Rei and Gendo.

OT: Watched The Boys and it was pretty darn good. It's basically Robocop with superheroes, and it surprised me with how much this show was allowed to get away with. It's like the inverse of Man of Steel and Batman v. Superman, where the superheroes are depicted as violent and destructive not because they should (Zack Snyder!) but because they would. There's an incredibly dark moment in Ep. 4 that was handled amazingly, and that without getting violent or edgey. And in that same episode there's also one of the funniest.

Anthoney Starr as Homelander is almost too good. It's hard for me to believe the outside world could buy into him being this big blue boyscout when Starr has this creepy good guy smile all the time. But then people also buy into Tom Cruise, I guess. I also loved how it showed Vought turning this moment of empowerment for Starlight and her rebeling against Vought into a marketing ploy. Even putting a Katy Perry song over it to show just how "feminist" they were. It was pretty fucking vile, and it was great.

Casual Shinji:

Dalisclock:
Also, one has to wonder if Japan has something against Mental Healthcare or just NERV doesn't run psych evals on, well, anyone who works there, because it's damn clear that all the main characters should be in therapy/on meds by the end, if not outright relieved of duty. "Asuka, are you clearly having a mental breakdown? Tough. Back in the Eva you go to face yet another terrifying abomination".

That never really comes across in their work though. As fucked up as Misato and Ritsuko are they are very professional when it comes to their job. I think that's deliberate to show the contrast between to how they present themselves and how they really are deep down. Their character design add to this as well, since from the outside all of them look like nice wholesome individuals, with the exception of maybe Rei and Gendo.

I was thinking more along the lines of the 3 pilots, who are the ones out there facing the horrors up close and personal like every other week(the show takes place over the course of a year, so divide by 15 angels...). Yeah, Misato and Ritsuko are the most stable of the characters, despite Misatos horrible, horrible parenting/guardianship and being a total lush when she's off work. Ritsuko, OTOH, is incredibly composed until she fucking just looses it near the end of the series and starts trying to kill everyone(starting with the "dummy plugs").

Dalisclock:
I was thinking more along the lines of the 3 pilots, who are the ones out there facing the horrors up close and personal like every other week(the show takes place over the course of a year, so divide by 15 angels...). Yeah, Misato and Ritsuko are the most stable of the characters, despite Misatos horrible, horrible parenting/guardianship and being a total lush when she's off work. Ritsuko, OTOH, is incredibly composed until she fucking just looses it near the end of the series and starts trying to kill everyone(starting with the "dummy plugs").

Well, Rei is pretty much owned by NERV, so they can do whatever they want with her. I think that's even one of her fears, to not be needed anymore and to be disposed of (very similar to Asuka and Shinji actually). Asuka doesn't want to quit for anything even if it kills her. She'd rather die than not be a pilot. And Shinji seems to get deliberately fucked with by the powers that be, because there are multiple times he's told 'you can just stop being a pilot' by Misato and even Gendo, but with the caveat that 'oh, but it will mean the end of humanity'. The show is kind of really fucking mean like that, but at the same time it's sorta "inspiring" in that it's message is 'choose what you want for yourself regardless of the consequences'. I think this comes from Japan's worker bee mentality, and that kids are raised to cypher away their own wants and needs and just become productive members of society. And I think Anno was trying to say with this that even if it is to the detriment of society 'you do you'.

Voltron: Legendary Defender; Season 7 (4/5)

Holy shit.

Serious question, is there a series out there where it gets this good this late in the game? Like, it took this show six seasons to get a "good" season, and season 6 was only "good" because the show went "what the heck, let's do action." Season 7 is good, and is good in a way that isn't based on "good for what it does." It's good, as in, actually...good.

That's not to say it's perfect though, and this seasons does have flaws. For starters, there's a bit of a divide between the two halves, in that the first is more self-contained, fillerish episodes, while the latter is tight, episode-to-episode continuity. Now, the early episodes are enjoyable (especially the game show one), but still fillerish. You could cut out the bulk of season 7's first half and barely miss any of the plot. Second of all, Sendak. He's...not a good villain. In fact, come to think of it, none of this show's villains have been good. Zarkon had an interesting backstory, but he was a boring antagonist. Lotor was the best of the bunch, but it's stymied by how his status as a villain was obvious, and his ambitions were left vague. Sendak is just some warlord who wants power. He's arguably better than Zarkon in that he's more of a physical threat (and this pays off with his duel with Shiro), but there's no emotional investment with him. And third of all, Rochelle. Or Romelle. Or "blonde Altean girl whose name I can barely even remember." Like, seriously what does she do in this season? Why is she here? FFS, Cosmo the Space Wolf does more than she does. She plays a key role in revealing Lotor's deception in the last season, but it's like the writers asked themselves "okay, so what do we do with her now?" and came up with the answer of "meh, just let her tag along and stay in the background - no-one will notice." Well, I noticed guys. I. NOTICED.

Okay, now that that's out of the way, let's get on with what's good. Above all, season 7 corrects an issue I've had with the series up to this point, and that's its approach to the issue of scale. Up until now, VLD has used terms like "galaxy" and "unvierse" interchangably, and things are so big, it's hard to become invested. However, season 7 focuses its activities on Earth. As in, galra invade Earth, Earth fights back, Earth loses but continues to resist, paladins come and liberate Earth despite all the roadblocks in their way. The stakes are clear, and it's easy to be invested in them because the galra aren't chumps. Earthlings aren't chumps either per se, but they're outgunned if not outnumbered, and it makes the stakes all the more real. You could argue that this season feels out of sync with the others, and there's some truth to that in regards to its much darker (if not grittier) tone, but I'm fine. In hindsight, VLD made the same mistake for me that Prisoner Zero did. It started off so big, when it would have been better to start off small, then have the stakes increase over time. Season 7 simultaniously feels like a series finale, yet also a series opener in some ways, given that it ends with alien refugees coming to Earth, with the intent of using it as a base to liberate the universe from the galra. So, does that sound like the ending of a penultimate season, or the start of a premise? Because I know there's one season left where the cast apparently accomplishes their goal, but still, I'd rather thave this as the start of that goal rather than the hazy footing of the first two seasons where there's no sense of scale other than "galra big, galra bad, one robot lion thing is able to beat galra."

So, yeah. Good season. Shame it took the show this long to get to this level, but hey, I'll take what victories I can get.

After watching The Trial Of Tim Heidecker a while ago and finding the subversive humor... intriguing, I decided to follow recommendations and watch 12 Hours of On Cinema At The Cinema for the context of the aforementioned "trial."

Maybe someone smarter than me can supply the correct terminology if such a thing exists, but I can best describe this stuff as extremely long-form cringe comedy? Tim Heidecker and Gregg Turkington play critics on a very low budget movie review show. Heidecker is the mumbling, neurotic, easily upset host of the show and Turkington is the pretentious, self-proclaimed film expert who basically co-hosts, but Heidecker is quick to remind him he's only a "guest." No one moment is funny unto itself (awkward, yes, but funny, no) but watching the slow boil over the course of HOURS makes for some prime hilarity. And what makes it even more brilliant is that the funniest moments should be the least funny, e.g.: learning that Heidecker's wife left him when he decided to undergo a life-saving surgery on the blood clots in his brain is funny? Yeah, you had to be there... 3 hours ago. I'm not going to pretend I understand how or why they do it, but I can appreciate their ability and willingness to commit to a very, very, VERY niche humor.

EDIT: Just finished the 12 hours of On Cinema (essentially watched the first 8 seasons in 2.5 days,) and lemme say, while I don't know to whom to recommend this show, it is brilliant. The slow, subtle and entirely absurd descent of Heidecker from good natured, charmingly selfish entrepreneur to egomaniacal living train wreck and Turkington's pathetic attempt to maintain any semblance of their shared film review show's legitimacy at any cost has been darkly hysterical. Literally nothing Heidecker suffers (or the invariable suffering he causes) would be remotely funny if they were to happen to anyone in real life, but for some reason... I don't know; maybe "imagine if Job (guy from the Bible, not employment) were a completely self-centered asshole and actually deserved everything that happened to him and learned nothing from his mistakes? Yeah, I'll go with that. Off to start season 9...

Carnivale Row (Season One)

A fantasy series on Amazon Prime, starring Orlando Bloom playing Colin Farrell playing detective Rycroft Philostrate in a Victorian style city, Cara Delivigne as refugee fairy creature Vignette Stonemoss, his former lover who came to the city as an illegal immigrant, working as a maid to noblewoman Imogen Pembroke and Jared Harris as chancellor Absalom Breakspear. Aren't you sick of these names already?

Listen, here's what Carnivale Row is: It's Discworld, more specifically, one of the later Discworld novels about the City Watch of Ankh-Morpork, without any of the humor. Or the charme. Or the likeable characters. Or the subtlety when it comes to addressing real life issues, not that those had a lot in the first place. What it replaces those with is distinctly Games of Thronesian "grit". Carnivale Row is Dark Fantasy, you see. Where people kill each other a lot. And say "Fuck" a lot. And, indeed, do fuck a lot, in that "no one involved is actually enjoying this" way in which nominally mature American media tends to frame sex scenes.

The premise, in general, is not exactly bad, following Bloom's detective invistigating the murder of fae creatures, one of the cities many discriminated species, and uncovering some sinister conspiracies. The show has solid worldbuilding for sure. But all of that just can't carry the whole show. Neither can most of the actors, for that matter. Orlando Bloom is not an actor who lends himself very well to a hardboiled detective role and while god was very generous to Cara Delivigne when he was handing out eyebrows, he was much less so when he was handing out acting talent. Actually, why does anyone who was in Suicide Squad still have a career?

The story does revel in its own grit, the chancellor's son gets kidnapped and tortured, Vignette joins a faery crime syndicates named the Black Ravens, it's all very "That Fantasy Novel you've been meaning to write when you were 16". You see, what made Game of Thrones work, until they ran out of books and tried playing it by ear, was that there was a humanity to take its edge of. Carnivale Row doesn't have that. I get that it's meant to invoke film noir but those are expected to have a much tighter script than Carnivale Row's sprawl.

I've been taking the piss out of the show for multiple paragraphs now and I do think it deserves it but certain redeeming qualities are there. Aside from lavish production design helping it's genuinely well fleshed out setting come to life it's morals are mostly genuinely positive. The problem is, it's too joyless a show to get much enjoyment out of. Maybe it'll manage to find its footing in future seasons but... no, I can't recommend it unless you have a really specific itch for a fantasy noir series that simply needs to be scratched.

Mindhunters: Season 2 (7/10)

They switched the POV character from Agent Ford to Agent Tench. I would guess this was done because agent Tench is the more "relatable" character even though Ford is easily the more interesting character. But that is offset by Tench's side story being far more interesting than Ford's from season 1. And being set in the backdrop of the Atlanta Child Murders made for some interesting storytelling. It unfortunately left Anna Torv's Wendy Carr without much to do this season, but what they added in for her was OK and wasn't a distraction like Ford's shoehorned in relationship from season 1. Cameron Britton still remains the standout casting choice, genuinely unsettling as Ed Kemper. I'm not sure where they go next for season 3, if I had to guess Netflix will announce there will be no season 3. They haven't given it any of the same kind of "push" they have given to several of Netflix's other successes, and they have killed some of those already. I'm pretty sure it was a mistake to feature as a backdrop the BTK serial killings, as that wasn't solved until 2005 and the story of Mindhunters has just barely gotten to the 1980's. But that part of the story is interesting to me personally, because I was in the courthouse the day Dennis Rader was giving his confession when he changed his plea (the radio station sent me as a technician along with our reporter covering the case.) I hate to say it, but I'm not sure I'd be as interested in the show if I didn't live in the city where BTK stalked his victims and remained free for decades.

Xprimentyl:
After watching The Trial Of Tim Heidecker a while ago and finding the subversive humor? intriguing, I decided to follow recommendations and watch 12 Hours of On Cinema At The Cinema for the context of the aforementioned ?trial.?

Maybe someone smarter than me can supply the correct terminology if such a thing exists, but I can best describe this stuff as extremely long-form cringe comedy? Tim Heidecker and Gregg Turkington play critics on a very low budget movie review show. Heidecker is the mumbling, neurotic, easily upset host of the show and Turkington is the pretentious, self-proclaimed film expert who basically co-hosts, but Heidecker is quick to remind him he?s only a ?guest.? No one moment is funny unto itself (awkward, yes, but funny, no) but watching the slow boil over the course of HOURS makes for some prime hilarity. And what makes it even more brilliant is that the funniest moments should be the least funny, e.g.: learning that Heidecker?s wife left him when he decided to undergo a life-saving surgery on the blood clots in his brain is funny? Yeah, you had to be there? 3 hours ago. I?m not going to pretend I understand how or why they do it, but I can appreciate their ability and willingness to commit to a very, very, VERY niche humor.

EDIT: Just finished the 12 hours of On Cinema (essentially watched the first 8 seasons in 2.5 days,) and lemme say, while I don?t know to whom to recommend this show, it is brilliant. The slow, subtle and entirely absurd descent of Heidecker from good natured, charmingly selfish entrepreneur to egomaniacal living train wreck and Turkington?s pathetic attempt to maintain any semblance of their shared film review show?s legitimacy at any cost has been darkly hysterical. Literally nothing Heidecker suffers (or the invariable suffering he causes) would be remotely funny if they were to happen to anyone in real life, but for some reason? I don?t know; maybe ?imagine if Job (guy from the Bible, not employment) were a completely self-centered asshole and actually deserved everything that happened to him and learned nothing from his mistakes? Yeah, I?ll go with that. Off to start season 9?

The oscar specials are... um. Exercises in endurance over how much cringe one can take? Witnessing a man's journey into megalomania and madness? The long-term buildup of this show is genius.
He's basically an alternative-universe version of Trump.
(also Turkington is a legend. Look up Neil Hamburger. And Faxed Head)

Baffle2:
This is an excellent review and I agree wholeheartedly. Well done that flesh being!

Oops, thankyou, it's helpful to know when the written words make sense, as they feel like they often do not and am trying to undo that little by little. Sorry, reply is so very late, hadn't realised you had quoted due to notification absence and have been relying for ages on just being interested in threads to read updates. Also it has been made clear by those close in recent times am not so good at taking compliments at all, so this is an attempt at fighting every instinct to run away and hide pretending it didn't happen for once. Ok, over-explaining is getting real weird, where's the pictures worth a thousand words to substitute this??

-- unrelated subject change to avoid uncomfortable feelings --

Sticks and Stones: 8/10

Has anyone else watched Dave Chappelle's newest Netflix special Sticks and Stones? A giant middle finger to social justice; punches were not pulled. Personally, I thought it was hilarious, but yeah, not for everybody. It's less a series of setup-to-punchline jokes, and more a series of pointed and topical rants; think Bill Hicks or George Carlin, comedians who've reached maximum cynicism and deliver a message in a way that makes us laugh, but the undertone is very much "no, assholes, I'm dead fucking serious." If you know Dave Chappelle, you know he's not for the easily offended, but in this one, it's not just the "N" word you need to brace for: child molestation, opioid addiction, LGBTQ community, school shootings, etc.

Xprimentyl:
Sticks and Stones: 8/10

Has anyone else watched Dave Chappelle's newest Netflix special Sticks and Stones? A giant middle finger to social justice; punches were not pulled. Personally, I thought it was hilarious, but yeah, not for everybody. It's less a series of setup-to-punchline jokes, and more a series of pointed and topical rants; think Bill Hicks or George Carlin, comedians who've reached maximum cynicism and deliver a message in a way that makes us laugh, but the undertone is very much "no, assholes, I'm dead fucking serious." If you know Dave Chappelle, you know he?s not for the easily offended, but in this one, it's not just the 'N' word you need to brace for: child molestation, opioid addiction, LGBTQ community, school shootings, etc.

I did, actually. To respond to your post.

It was like a high 6 for me.

I don't know. I just got into Clean Humor recently. I find it funnier. It doesn't rely on shock humor. Just real humor. For anyone who wants to know what I'm talking about, I suggest the channel Dry Bar Comedy. Mike P. Burton is a personal favorite.

Anyway, to Chappelle. It was eh. It felt a lot like "God, here are my grievances. Oh, right. I'm supposed to make you laugh. Here's an attempt to go along with my grievances. Ok! Back to my grievances."

The more people are trying to be non-political, the sad truth is the more political they are becoming. Getting mad at censorship and trying to yell down people so you don't have to deal with their politics is simply a political move. It continually perplexes me why people do not understand that.

But, to be fair to the comedy, I like Dave Chappelle back with his maniac energy. He would have a well thought out point, and then he'd make his joke, and then he'd end it with a burst of Energy. His famous rant about Women and Men and the reason we have nice cars is a great example of that. Ever since the Chappelle Show, his lack of energy drains me almost every single time.

ObsidianJones:
I just got into Clean Humor recently.

Ew... Not because it exists but because it has a name.

Stranger Things 1 & 2

Decent enough to keep you watching. Dustin is the best character because he acts most age-appropriately and isn't so perfect and precious as the rest of the teenagers (too much weird shit happens to Will, he is a completely different character in comparison). I like how the boys recognize how much movie and video game logic seems to affect their surroundings.

Now I watched the first 'chapter' of the third season and I'm already anticipating just how they will turn Steve's and Hop's (and Dustin's too, I guess) emasculation around. It sure is that familiar of a set up.

An Evening With Paul Capsis (2/5)

It's crap.

It's a lot of screaming that professes to be singing.

It's crap.

Don't see it.

ObsidianJones:

Xprimentyl:
Sticks and Stones: 8/10

I did, actually. To respond to your post.

It was like a high 6 for me.

I don't know. I just got into Clean Humor recently. I find it funnier. It doesn't rely on shock humor. Just real humor. For anyone who wants to know what I'm talking about, I suggest the channel Dry Bar Comedy. Mike P. Burton is a personal favorite.

Anyway, to Chappelle. It was eh. It felt a lot like "God, here are my grievances. Oh, right. I'm supposed to make you laugh. Here's an attempt to go along with my grievances. Ok! Back to my grievances."

The more people are trying to be non-political, the sad truth is the more political they are becoming. Getting mad at censorship and trying to yell down people so you don't have to deal with their politics is simply a political move. It continually perplexes me why people do not understand that.

But, to be fair to the comedy, I like Dave Chappelle back with his maniac energy. He would have a well thought out point, and then he'd make his joke, and then he'd end it with a burst of Energy. His famous rant about Women and Men and the reason we have nice cars is a great example of that. Ever since the Chappelle Show, his lack of energy drains me almost every single time.

My preference for stand-up comedy is all over the board; about the only type I don't like is musical comedy (when a comedian sits on a stool and breaks out an acoustic guitar, I can't roll my eyes hard enough) or shock comics, those that put on a persona of "asshole" and for whom it's clear their ONLY purpose is to ruffle feathers and push buttons with no real substantive content or reason.

I don't feel this time out (or any time, really) Chappelle falls into the latter category, neither do I believe him to be taking an apolitical stance, quite the contrary. Dave Chappelle has always been of the idea that "hey, everybody's fair game," and the sociopolitical environment of today is now, more than ever, very much of an opposing mindset, and as comics' cynicism is often the biggest weapon in the arsenal, this latest shows was him firing back. In so many ways, he basically said "it doesn't matter what I do or say, someone's going to find SOMETHING to demonize me at ANY given point; tomorrow or 10 years from now, I'm going to be "guilty" of something, so why change who I am when it'll never be good enough?" It was more an assertion of self; this was his acknowledging that he HAD allowed the industry to drain him and fighting back, "sticks and stones."

Kwak:

Xprimentyl:
Snip

The oscar specials are... um. Exercises in endurance over how much cringe one can take? Witnessing a man's journey into megalomania and madness? The long-term buildup of this show is genius.
He's basically an alternative-universe version of Trump.
(also Turkington is a legend. Look up Neil Hamburger. And Faxed Head)

Just finished the Oscar specials as well, and yeah, brilliant. I couldn't help but belly laugh at the start of each show where he apologized for his drinking and antics during last year's special... shortly before starting to drink. And poor Mark!

"I'm sorta regretting praying to God for this show to work well because that seems to have bit in the ass. That's the last time I ever pray to him. F*** God! And Guess what? Bad news, everybody, this IS full of booze. I thought it was organic soda, but it IS champagne. I finished a bottle." XD

Xprimentyl:
My preference for stand-up comedy is all over the board; about the only type I don't like is musical comedy (when a comedian sits on a stool and breaks out an acoustic guitar, I can't roll my eyes hard enough) or shock comics, those that put on a persona of 'asshole' and for whom it?s clear their ONLY purpose is to ruffle feathers and push buttons with no real substantive content or reason.

I don't feel this time out (or any time, really) Chappelle falls into the latter category, neither do I believe him to be taking an apolitical stance, quite the contrary. Dave Chappelle has always been of the idea that "hey, everybody's fair game," and the sociopolitical environment of today is now, more than ever, very much of an opposing mindset, and as comics' cynicism is often the biggest weapon in the arsenal, this latest shows was him firing back. In so many ways, he basically said "it doesn't matter what I do or say, someone's going to find SOMETHING to demonize me at ANY given point; tomorrow or 10 years from now, I'm going to be 'guilty' of something, so why change who I am when it'll never be good enough?" It was more an assertion of self; this was his acknowledging that he HAD allowed the industry to drain him and fighting back, 'sticks and stones.'

And you see, that's the thing.

He was very much everyone's fair game. "Let me talk about the world, dating, men, politics, race relations and differences..." He was everywhere. I loved it.

This special seems more "Let me tell you what's wrong with the world now".

And that's fine. I get it. His time, his choice of topics. But it bothers me that people pretend that this is all due to the #MeToo and the SJW-culture. How people are so sensitive in 2019 that it's stifling speech.

That's bull. That's been happening since I've been alive.

-Ellen was cancelled (literally) because uptight conservatives couldn't deal that a woman admitted to being a lesbian.
-Blossom got too real with serious issues (like date rape) and NBC yanked it because they didn't want to upset anyone's sensibilities.
-White people got bugged that the Force Awakens had non-white males as the lead and tried to boycott.
-Ren and Stimpy got everyone yelling "WON'T SOMEONE THINK OF THE CHILDREN" which led to cancellation.
-Profit had not only the public, but business people calling in because the lead character was so morally against their grains that they couldn't take it any more.
-The Garbage Pail Kids had a tv show. I never watched it. I never got the deal with it. But Protests came aknocking.
-Kid Nation was a terrible idea. But a lot of coked up producers tried anyway. The protests put it to bed quickly.
-Heil Honey, I'm Home. Yes, it was a sitcom about Hitler living in suburbia next to Jews. And yes, You're God Damned Right it was Cancelled
-Everyone shouted down the Bill Cosby accusers because he was Bill freaking Cosby.
-All My Baby Mamas didn't even get to air because the Black Community was all over it.
-Both the Dixie Chicks and Politically Incorrect saw nothing but Backs when they spoke out against Bush.
-GCB actually saw a rise in its ratings. But Christians weren't happy. And it was weirdly cancelled.
-Hell, the comedian of all comedians, Lenny Bruce was censored by the more conservative mindset so many times that he was followed and observed after his obscenity arrest.

Like, I can go on. There's no shortage of people getting huffy throughout civilization and trying to get something cancelled that they weren't watching anyawy. But we have comedians like Joe Rogan saying it's never been as bad as this... When Lenny Freaking Bruce was even talked about not minutes ago on his podcast! The man who was arrested for saying c*cksucker vs protests and whining on twitter. Is that really a comparison?

I'm not a big fan of cancel culture. I never was. And it's been around since the 80's. 70's. 60's. 50's... Cancel Culture has always been a thing everywhere. You don't like it, call the advertisement people and threaten to boycott. Those people will pull their funding and that whatever will go away. It's happened so many times to count that I find anyone who say it's never been this bad to be disingenuous. That doesn't make it better under #MeToo. It just makes everyone false who pretend that this is something new and you just have to give up.

You can do that. Or, you can fight like Bruce. You can fight like Carlin. People got so used to the ease and sleaze of the early 2000's where you could get away with a lot more. There's a reason we haven't seen a "___ Movie" from the Wayans Brothers in a while. Other than those movies suck. People want to have a say but really do not have to deal with the consequences. And oddly enough, these are the same comics who say "Oh, women want all the power but none of the agency. They want to mouth off but don't want to actually rise above the level they deem appropriate."

Comics, the kettle and the pot are both indeed black.

... That was my long winded way of saying "I get it, but this is nothing new".

The Last Wife (4/5)

Not that you'd know it from the title, but if I told you that this was a stage play based on the life of Catherine Parr, last wife of Henry VIII, then suddenly the title makes a bit more sense, right? Right?

Well, whatever. Play's pretty good. Very good actually. It can be considered to be an abridged form of Catherine Parr's life, from her marriage to Henry, to her death. I will admit that if you don't know the history of Henry VIII, you might be a bit lost, and speaking personally, me watching 'The Tudors' helped me get a sense of what was what. But in addition to Catherine and Henry, we also get Mary, Elizabeth, Edward, and Thomas Seymour. All of them play the parts well - above all else, the actress who plays Mary gets top honours. She's great at the deadpan humour of one who's been screwed over all her life, and remains screwed over as Edward's the one who's going to get the throne because he's a boy.

Did I just reveal that this is a feminist play? Well, yes, but I actually mean that in a good sense here, in that it explores its themes of motherhood and empowerment, but is never preachy about it. Henry's a brute, but the play still gives him some sympathy, showing a man who's past his physical prime, who's pining still for his third wife, and is worried about his legacy. That's not to say that Henry is justified in his past actions (y'know, the whole decapitation thing), nor is his treatment of Catherine at times condonable, but it does show the man behind the monster, so to speak.

If I had any criticisms, it would be that the play is sometimes a bit too sensual for its own good (clothing, lying in bed, etc.) and it does have a few modern coloquialisms that made me raise an eyebrow (e.g. "throwing a curve ball - yes, baseball was apparently a thing in Tudor England). I suppose you could point out that Shakespeare used anachronisms as well and no-one penalizes him for it, but for better or worse, it was noticable. Still, these are nitpicks in what's a very solid performance.

Dave Chappelle: Sticks and Stones and Bill Burr: Paper Tiger. Each clocking around 8 or 9 out of 10.

Watched with my girlfriend, enjoyed both of them. Maybe I've seen Bill in too many specials or talk shows but I'm catching him repeat his act a lot lately, especially when his wife comes into play in his routines. He's a great storyteller though. Chappelle I enjoyed the hell out of. The whole shotgun bit towards the end dragged on but otherwise he's outstanding as ever. Like Burr, a lot of it is "just" body language and pitch double-takes. What sells it is how effortless it looks. Like the joke's taking over.

Also finished Terror in Resonance, or Zankyou no Terror for the weebs. 6 or 7 out of 10.

So I can tolerate anime for 26 episodes, which apparently is the norm for conclusive "one season" anime like Evangelion, Cowboy Bebop, Death Note, etc. At 11 I guess Terror in Resonance is more of the mini-series equivalent. Top marks for a a simple yet ever-developing plot and the tight pacing to sell what's essentially a paperback thriller. It's effective and intriguing.

The characters I didn't care for though. Part of it is due to that tired anime clich? about having a secret government facility for raising autists that always renders the key players of "adult" plots as 15 year olds. Part of it is also because none of the kids are given much characterization. Nine is grim, Twelve is cheery. That's it. Lisa is a fucking wet blanket, and unbearable. I only liked Shibazaki because I caught a glimpse of Spike Spiegel in him, and the growing rapport with his partner made them more interesting to watch. Kinda wish that the story would've been told from their perspective, with them as the protagonists.

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