Captain Marvel or How Marvel does everything better than everyone else

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Avnger:
A combination of Brie Larson daring to "shriek" (calmly state when interviewed) that "white people and men don't deserve opinions" (a more diverse group of film critics is a good thing) and morons truly believing "get woke, go broke."

Wasn't it closer to stating that whenever possible she didn't want to deal with white men in the press and in the position she's in now she has some power to make that a thing, or something to that effect?

The best part is that if she'd wanted to exclude any other demographic group from her press dealings (except maybe straight people) all the people supporting her would be suddenly violently opposed (imagine if someone said they didn't want to deal with [for example] Latina women in the press!)

Of course, like everyone else trying to be "woke", she's just one wrong statement away from the shitlist. Like Terry Crews and the drastic change in reaction when he went from "men are bad" statements like how he was abused by a man or talking about toxic masculinity to when he suggested that paternal influence was important for children and in came the outrage.

Schadrach:

Avnger:
A combination of Brie Larson daring to "shriek" (calmly state when interviewed) that "white people and men don't deserve opinions" (a more diverse group of film critics is a good thing) and morons truly believing "get woke, go broke."

Wasn't it closer to stating that whenever possible she didn't want to deal with white men in the press and in the position she's in now she has some power to make that a thing, or something to that effect?

The best part is that if she'd wanted to exclude any other demographic group from her press dealings (except maybe straight people) all the people supporting her would be suddenly violently opposed (imagine if someone said they didn't want to deal with [for example] Latina women in the press!)

Of course, like everyone else trying to be "woke", she's just one wrong statement away from the shitlist. Like Terry Crews and the drastic change in reaction when he went from "men are bad" statements like how he was abused by a man or talking about toxic masculinity to when he suggested that paternal influence was important for children and in came the outrage.

Here's what she said https://www.indiewire.com/2018/06/brie-larsons-i-do-not-hate-white-dudes-lack-of-inclusion-film-critics-1201974617/

Specifically, she's not very interested in HEARING 40 year old male reviewers as this might not be the movie for them. You know, like I can tell something like a Romcom is not made for me.

I emphasized hearing because she's not banning men. She's also noticed that most reviewers are white men thus she is looking for a great view of opinions.

It's not banning white men. It's signal boosting everyone else.

Schadrach:
The best part is that if she'd wanted to exclude any other demographic group from her press dealings (except maybe straight people) all the people supporting her would be suddenly violently opposed (imagine if someone said they didn't want to deal with [for example] Latina women in the press!)

Of course, like everyone else trying to be "woke", she's just one wrong statement away from the shitlist. Like Terry Crews and the drastic change in reaction when he went from "men are bad" statements like how he was abused by a man or talking about toxic masculinity to when he suggested that paternal influence was important for children and in came the outrage.

Do you often conjure up fantasies where a person you've decided to hate takes a different action than real life in a societal and historical context that is also completely different in order to feel outraged?

Avnger:

Schadrach:
The best part is that if she'd wanted to exclude any other demographic group from her press dealings (except maybe straight people) all the people supporting her would be suddenly violently opposed (imagine if someone said they didn't want to deal with [for example] Latina women in the press!)

Of course, like everyone else trying to be "woke", she's just one wrong statement away from the shitlist. Like Terry Crews and the drastic change in reaction when he went from "men are bad" statements like how he was abused by a man or talking about toxic masculinity to when he suggested that paternal influence was important for children and in came the outrage.

Do you often conjure up fantasies where a person you've decided to hate takes a different action than real life in a societal and historical context that is also completely different in order to feel outraged?

In fairness the left has a tendency to eat itself.

trunkage:
Specifically, she's not very interested in HEARING 40 year old male reviewers as this might not be the movie for them. You know, like I can tell something like a Romcom is not made for me.

I'm not interested in hearing what women have to say about {Movie}, it's not for them.

It's an MCU film, it's for everyone. Just like how every other Disney film is for everyone.

You don't become the powerhouse that is Disney by releasing blockbuster films that exclude a demographic.

If the genders of the speaker and the group whose opinions they did not wish to listen to were reversed, it'd be labelled as incredibly sexist.

The film was fine, not incredible, but it certainly linked Captain Marvel to the MCU and set her up for Endgame. The marketing surrounding it though was just unpleasant. "She's a girl! She's a GIRL! SHE'S A GIRL!"

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

Abomination:

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

Considering that the MCU only got a feature film with a heroine as the sole lead in its 20th outing it is sort of special, no? Considering how rare blockbuster movies with a woman in the sole lead role is, it definitely is sort of special.

I realize that for the average man it might not seem notable, but for women looking for female protagonists leading movies, it can be very notable just how few there are.

Gethsemani:

I realize that for the average man it might not seem notable, but for women looking for female protagonists leading movies, it can be very notable just how few there are.

It's such a Chicken-Egg situation. Would audiences watch just as many action-adventure movies if there were more female leads in them? Can't know for sure, because there has never been anything even close to a "saturation" of them. Like it would be tough for somebody who sees a handful of movies in a theater each year to only watch action movies with female leads -- let alone for a movie-enthusiast. The previous movie like that I saw in theaters was Mulan. No wait, I think Mortal Engines counts. Ruined that record now didn't I...

Here Comes Tomorrow:

Avnger:

Schadrach:
The best part is that if she'd wanted to exclude any other demographic group from her press dealings (except maybe straight people) all the people supporting her would be suddenly violently opposed (imagine if someone said they didn't want to deal with [for example] Latina women in the press!)

Of course, like everyone else trying to be "woke", she's just one wrong statement away from the shitlist. Like Terry Crews and the drastic change in reaction when he went from "men are bad" statements like how he was abused by a man or talking about toxic masculinity to when he suggested that paternal influence was important for children and in came the outrage.

Do you often conjure up fantasies where a person you've decided to hate takes a different action than real life in a societal and historical context that is also completely different in order to feel outraged?

In fairness the left has a tendency to eat itself.

Who said anything about "the left" or "the right?"

Abomination:

trunkage:
Specifically, she's not very interested in HEARING 40 year old male reviewers as this might not be the movie for them. You know, like I can tell something like a Romcom is not made for me.

I'm not interested in hearing what women have to say about {Movie}, it's not for them.

It's an MCU film, it's for everyone. Just like how every other Disney film is for everyone.

You don't become the powerhouse that is Disney by releasing blockbuster films that exclude a demographic.

If the genders of the speaker and the group whose opinions they did not wish to listen to were reversed, it'd be labelled as incredibly sexist.

The film was fine, not incredible, but it certainly linked Captain Marvel to the MCU and set her up for Endgame. The marketing surrounding it though was just unpleasant. "She's a girl! She's a GIRL! SHE'S A GIRL!"

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

Just because you don't personally appreciate how big a deal it is, doesn't mean it is not a big deal.

The US has never had a female president, it only just recently had a black one. How can nearly half the country be female and in over 2 centuries not have a female president!? In a supposedly fair and equal society, that is statistically unlikely. Maybe, just maybe, it is because sexism is still alive and well, and maybe your own privilaged male view is a product of that very sexism.

Now you COULD reflect on that and maybe atlreast try to understand the other side, or you could continue to dismiss it because you lack understanding of women's issues.

And I say this as someone who myself used to lack understanding of women's issues. Even as a trans person, I didnt grow up being put down by a mindset that as a female I have to abide by very different and really unfair rules, and the more I learn about these from actual women, the more I realize how fucked up women have it, and that women arent a minority the way LGBT people are actually makes it MORE fucked up, because HOW IS HALF THE WORLD ALLOWED TO BE TREATED SO POORLY!?

Women are not treated the same as men, and we wont fix that by pretending otherwise.

Abomination:

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

you're expending an awful amount of energy decrying something you claim is no more or less special than anything else

undeadsuitor:

Abomination:

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

you're expending an awful amount of energy decrying something you claim is no more or less special than anything else

knucklesthefeminist.jpg

Abomination:

trunkage:
Specifically, she's not very interested in HEARING 40 year old male reviewers as this might not be the movie for them. You know, like I can tell something like a Romcom is not made for me.

I'm not interested in hearing what women have to say about {Movie}, it's not for them.

It's an MCU film, it's for everyone. Just like how every other Disney film is for everyone.

You don't become the powerhouse that is Disney by releasing blockbuster films that exclude a demographic.

If the genders of the speaker and the group whose opinions they did not wish to listen to were reversed, it'd be labelled as incredibly sexist.

The film was fine, not incredible, but it certainly linked Captain Marvel to the MCU and set her up for Endgame. The marketing surrounding it though was just unpleasant. "She's a girl! She's a GIRL! SHE'S A GIRL!"

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

I would have guess of who she is talking about, but considering the outcry of some men (its only a small portion, but very vocal) around Captain Marvel existing, she's stating that this movie is not for them.

Don't hate Captain Marvel automatically? Without even reaching cinemas? No? Well then, she's not talking about you. Stop making things about yourself that have nothing to do with you.

Abomination:

trunkage:
I would have guess of who she is talking about, but considering the outcry of some men (its only a small portion, but very vocal) around Captain Marvel existing, she's stating that this movie is not for them.

Don't hate Captain Marvel automatically? Without even reaching cinemas? No? Well then, she's not talking about you. Stop making things about yourself that have nothing to do with you.

trunkage:
Specifically, she's not very interested in HEARING 40 year old male reviewers as this might not be the movie for them.

Never said it was ever about me. I'm not a reviewer. But as you said, she specifically doesn't want to hear the opinion of 40 year old men. Because fuck those guys, right?

But when she said that demographic she didn't actually MEAN that demographic. Just people who are sort of like that demographic and don't like the film for a specific reason, but she's not going to articulate it that way, rather she's going to specify a demographic based on sex, age, and ethnicity.

While I do fall under two of those three categories, and am within 10 years of meeting all three, I can still call such comments toxic as they are sexist, racist, and age discriminatory in nature... replace man with woman and white with black and uh-oh, that's a naughty thing suddenly.

undeadsuitor:

Abomination:

Like, okay, wow, yes. A girl superhero. Just as special as everyone else.

you're expending an awful amount of energy decrying something you claim is no more or less special than anything else

And in this upcoming blockbuster, you had best watch out, there's a new MAN here to save us all. This MAN will do everything in his power to save you. The hero all MEN have been waiting for!

The advertising was twee. Painting the fact that she's a woman as the most important thing about the character. When, just like with male heroes, the fact they are male is one of the least important things about them.

Saelune:
The US has never had a female president, it only just recently had a black one. How can nearly half the country be female and in over 2 centuries not have a female president!? In a supposedly fair and equal society, that is statistically unlikely. Maybe, just maybe, it is because sexism is still alive and well, and maybe your own privilaged male view is a product of that very sexism.

Presiden-- wuh? This is a Disney superhero movie...

My male privileged view?

God damn you're toxic.

You want to pretend sexism doesn't exist. I am not the toxic one here.

Saelune:
You want to pretend sexism doesn't exist. I am not the toxic one here.

Quote me specifically saying that sexism doesn't exist.

I know it exists, I see it spilling from your mouth half the time. Apparently, my opinion is flawed because I'm male.

Abomination:

Saelune:
You want to pretend sexism doesn't exist. I am not the toxic one here.

Quote me specifically saying that sexism doesn't exist.

I know it exists, I see it spilling from your mouth half the time. Apparently, my opinion is flawed because I'm male.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Implicature

You do realize just because you dont literally say something, doesnt mean you arent blatantly implying something?

You want to downplay the importance of a female superhero like Captain Marvel, you're not doing this on accident. By trying to dismiss the importance, you are trying to dismiss the plight women face in our sexist reality. Stop it.

Saelune:

Abomination:

Saelune:
You want to pretend sexism doesn't exist. I am not the toxic one here.

Quote me specifically saying that sexism doesn't exist.

I know it exists, I see it spilling from your mouth half the time. Apparently, my opinion is flawed because I'm male.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Implicature

You do realize just because you dont literally say something, doesnt mean you arent blatantly implying something?

You want to downplay the importance of a female superhero like Captain Marvel, you're not doing this on accident. By trying to dismiss the importance, you are trying to dismiss the plight women face in our sexist reality. Stop it.

Once again you prove incapable of considering context.

Just because I find the emphasis the advertising placed on Captain Marvel being a woman as a point against it, does not mean I am dismissing the issues women can face.

Just because I am not literally saying something doesn't mean I am blatantly implying something either.

She's a MCU superhero. The movie was alright. Her sex had nothing to do with the story or character - which is fine, films do not have to make the sex of their character important to the plot. Just like how Miles' ethnicity had nothing to do with the story of Spider-Verse, it was flavour and a characterisation.

It was a film with a female hero. It's not an anomaly. It is not as common, sure, but it's hardly groundbreaking. It's great that it exists and has done well at the box office. I hope it shows that investors need not be afraid to put more women in roles for films like this. That said, it didn't succeed BECAUSE it had a female lead - it was probably going to succeed anyway because it's a MCU film and Endgame is around the corner.

We do not want the sex of the protagonist to matter - so it's probably best we stop trying to make it matter. I would find the advertising push equally as awkward if it was placing emphasis on the fact the protagonist is a male.

Abomination, don't bother arguing with Saelune. She can't (or won't) debate in good faith.

Anyway, I'm just going to reiterate what I've expressed earlier

-Is Captain Marvel the first female superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first successful superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first female MCU superhero film? (yes)

Hawki:

Anyway, I'm just going to reiterate what I've expressed earlier

-Is Captain Marvel the first female superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first successful superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first female MCU superhero film? (yes)

Is there anybody who actually needs those questions answered? Is there are person on this planet who asks if Captain Marvel is the first successful superhero film?

You're such an attention hog platypus!

Meanwhile on the topic of the MCU and how the local cinema chain (the one with the only IMAX in the country), had an online queue for getting the advance tickets to Endgame, but forgot to tell that the online store PUTS YOU IN QUEUE AUTOMATICALLY! So because I didn't know about any of that I got there only 5 minutes in advance and surprise surprise I didn't get into the Wednesday showing that I wanted! Oh boy am I mad! Grr!

McElroy:
Is there anybody who actually needs those questions answered? Is there are person on this planet who asks if Captain Marvel is the first successful superhero film?

First successful superhero film? No. First successful female superhero film? In some parts, yes.

It doesn't bother me too much - I mean, it comes with the territory of advertising. Still, it does rankle me a bit, if only because I consider Wonder Woman to be superior.

Hawki:
Abomination, don't bother arguing with Saelune. She can't (or won't) debate in good faith.

Agreed. It's why I rarely respond to her. That, and she takes things too personally.

Hawki:

Anyway, I'm just going to reiterate what I've expressed earlier

-Is Captain Marvel the first female superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first successful superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first female MCU superhero film? (yes)

Kind like how the press was going on about how Deadpool was the first successful R-rated comic book movie, even though The Crow, Blade, or Kick-Ass exists. Granted, DP made more money than any of those combined, but people in the film press forget or pretend to forget. Though the less said about most of the sequels in those films, the better. Black Panther had a similar situation. All of sudden, people forgot the Blade movies exsisted or Meteor Man.

Abomination:

Saelune:

Abomination:
Quote me specifically saying that sexism doesn't exist.

I know it exists, I see it spilling from your mouth half the time. Apparently, my opinion is flawed because I'm male.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Implicature

You do realize just because you dont literally say something, doesnt mean you arent blatantly implying something?

You want to downplay the importance of a female superhero like Captain Marvel, you're not doing this on accident. By trying to dismiss the importance, you are trying to dismiss the plight women face in our sexist reality. Stop it.

Once again you prove incapable of considering context.

Just because I find the emphasis the advertising placed on Captain Marvel being a woman as a point against it, does not mean I am dismissing the issues women can face.

Just because I am not literally saying something doesn't mean I am blatantly implying something either.

She's a MCU superhero. The movie was alright. Her sex had nothing to do with the story or character - which is fine, films do not have to make the sex of their character important to the plot. Just like how Miles' ethnicity had nothing to do with the story of Spider-Verse, it was flavour and a characterisation.

It was a film with a female hero. It's not an anomaly. It is not as common, sure, but it's hardly groundbreaking. It's great that it exists and has done well at the box office. I hope it shows that investors need not be afraid to put more women in roles for films like this. That said, it didn't succeed BECAUSE it had a female lead - it was probably going to succeed anyway because it's a MCU film and Endgame is around the corner.

We do not want the sex of the protagonist to matter - so it's probably best we stop trying to make it matter. I would find the advertising push equally as awkward if it was placing emphasis on the fact the protagonist is a male.

I am well aware of the context, and it is that context that I am not letting you slip by and pretend you aren't dismissing the problems of sexism against women in this modern day.

Its like when people respond to 'Black Lives Matters' by saying 'All Lives Matter', because as nice a sentiment as that pretends to be, it blatantly ignores the specific issues black people face. As nice as the sentiment that this movie 'is just like any other', that ignores the context of sexism and neglect that women still face even today.

If sexism isn't an issue, why is this topic going for pages about how 'totally not sexist but' people are?

By pretending nothing is wrong, you are adding to the problem. The first step to solving any problem is admitting there is one.

Hawki:
Abomination, don't bother arguing with Saelune. She can't (or won't) debate in good faith.

Anyway, I'm just going to reiterate what I've expressed earlier

-Is Captain Marvel the first female superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first successful superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first female MCU superhero film? (yes)

CoCage:

Hawki:
Abomination, don't bother arguing with Saelune. She can't (or won't) debate in good faith.

Agreed. It's why I rarely respond to her. That, and she takes things too personally.

Hawki:

Anyway, I'm just going to reiterate what I've expressed earlier

-Is Captain Marvel the first female superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first successful superhero film? (no)

-Is Captain Marvel the first female MCU superhero film? (yes)

Kind like how the press was going on about how Deadpool was the first successful R-rated comic book movie, even though The Crow, Blade, or Kick-Ass exists. Granted, DP made more money than any of those combined, but people in the film press forget or pretend to forget. Though the less said about most of the sequels in those films, the better. Black Panther had a similar situation. All of sudden, people forgot the Blade movies exsisted or Meteor Man.

People who don't argue in good faith: 'Saelune doesn't argue in good faith'

Saelune:
I am not letting you slip by and pretend you aren't dismissing the problems of sexism against women in this modern day.

I'm not and I haven't.

You are insisting I have, but have provided no proof other than hinting at the idea that it's possible for someone to say one thing while secretly meaning another thing.

Just forget it. It's impossible to discuss anything with you without you implying the other person isn't a racist/sexist/homophobe/transphobic or whatever and then the discussion devolves into explaining the context of a discussion and why you're tilting at windmills again.

You do not argue in good faith, and toss accusations of bigotry on a whim.

Abomination:

Saelune:
I am not letting you slip by and pretend you aren't dismissing the problems of sexism against women in this modern day.

I'm not and I haven't.

You are insisting I have, but have provided no proof other than hinting at the idea that it's possible for someone to say one thing while secretly meaning another thing.

Just forget it. It's impossible to discuss anything with you without you implying the other person isn't a racist/sexist/homophobe/transphobic or whatever and then the discussion devolves into explaining the context of a discussion and why you're tilting at windmills again.

You do not argue in good faith, and toss accusations of bigotry on a whim.

I have provided proof. You just don't like it. I don't expect you to like it, and I don't care that you don't like it, cause I don't like your dismissal of women's issues.

There are plenty of people I don't accuse of bigotry. Cause they don't do or say bigoted things. Go figure.

undeadsuitor gets it, trunkage gets it, Gethesemani and Avnger get it.

Saelune:

There are plenty of people I don't accuse of bigotry. Cause they don't do or say bigoted things. Go figure.

Ah yes, like back in comment number 6 you perfectly read my mind on how I dislike female empowerment when truth be told I don't even know what that is.

Anyway because I have something to say apart from a bit of snark:

Abomination:
We do not want the sex of the protagonist to matter - so it's probably best we stop trying to make it matter.

But it's going to always matter because the sexes are different. The best that we can hope for is that our media reflects all tastes in this regard. In one of the final shots of Aquaman you can look at the same spot on screen for as the camera turns for a couple of seconds and enjoy the view of both Amber Heard's butt and Jason Momoa's Atlantic bulge. That's equal opportunity right there. On the other hand maybe the new Jumanji (3 guys and one oddly dressed hot gal) is the flip of the new Ghostbusters (4 women in grey overalls and one hot dude) but only superficially, because a male audience doesn't get the same, let's just say "feeling" from the former as a female audience gets from the latter.

Moreover if I may go a bit off-track, treating the relative lack of women in top corporate positions, presidents, or action movies stars as a serious problem is just feel-good fluff people do to look good since they have little else of substance to them. Those are the 1% of the 1% and not anything the average person can relate to.

McElroy:

Saelune:

There are plenty of people I don't accuse of bigotry. Cause they don't do or say bigoted things. Go figure.

Ah yes, like back in comment number 6 you perfectly read my mind on how I dislike female empowerment when truth be told I don't even know what that is.

Anyway because I have something to say apart from a bit of snark:

Abomination:
We do not want the sex of the protagonist to matter - so it's probably best we stop trying to make it matter.

But it's going to always matter because the sexes are different. The best that we can hope for is that our media reflects all tastes in this regard. In one of the final shots of Aquaman you can look at the same spot on screen for as the camera turns for a couple of seconds and enjoy the view of both Amber Heard's butt and Jason Momoa's Atlantic bulge. That's equal opportunity right there. On the other hand maybe the new Jumanji (3 guys and one oddly dressed hot gal) is the flip of the new Ghostbusters (4 women in grey overalls and one hot dude) but only superficially, because a male audience doesn't get the same, let's just say "feeling" from the former as a female audience gets from the latter.

Moreover if I may go a bit off-track, treating the relative lack of women in top corporate positions, presidents, or action movies stars as a serious problem is just feel-good fluff people do to look good since they have little else of substance to them. Those are the 1% of the 1% and not anything the average person can relate to.

Like minded people defending each other just proves the similarities.

Enough. Get back on Topic and stay there.

image

Here's my perspective on Captain Marvel: I quite liked the movie. It wasn't my favorite Marvel movie, but it was pretty damn far from the bottom of the list as well.

The only thing that really bothered me about it was just how powerful Captain Marvel was after she became fully powered up. I get the long game idea, that as they step up the level of threats Marvel villains possess, they also need to step up the power levels of the heroes.

Here's the issue I had with it: Captain Marvel, fully powered up, was so much more powerful than the threat she was facing in this movie that the end climax...wasn't really much of a climax. When you have your main character powerful enough to destroy an entire fleet of ships from the baddies with her bare hands, there's a bit of an imbalance.

Am I saying that's a problem because Captain Marvel is a woman? Hardly. It's a problem because she's about 20 power levels above her opponent, able to pulverize them without breaking a sweat. Compare this to Thor: Ragnarok. Thor took a power level prior to the climax, just like Captain Marvel. However, that power level only really let him square off against Hela, fighting her on even ground. He wasn't able to fight off her entire army, then just suplex her off the bridge like it was no big deal.

Again, it's not bad that Captain Marvel is that powerful in the long term, as it really shows how serious a situation is if Captain Marvel is required to deal with it. For this particular threat, though, it was essentially Shaquille O'Neal facing off against Peter Dinklage in a one-on-one game of basketball. There's not a whole lot of tension when one person has a total advantage in every conceivable way.

thebobmaster:
Again, it's not bad that Captain Marvel is that powerful in the long term, as it really shows how serious a situation is if Captain Marvel is required to deal with it. For this particular threat, though, it was essentially Shaquille O'Neal facing off against Peter Dinklage in a one-on-one game of basketball. There's not a whole lot of tension when one person has a total advantage in every conceivable way.

I'm wondering just how long term that power is though. Her powers let her absorb energy not just project it, its why the theme of "when she falls, she gets back up" works for the film so well; its not just a "girl power!" thing, its literally telling you how her abilities work. You hit her, she takes it, she comes back stronger. And right before the finale the Supreme Intelligence hits her with a big ol' energy blast that lets her eat the power supply of an entire imperial star cruiser, so she goes into that fight with a tank full of juice. Might be that if she's going to exert herself she might need topping up from time to time

Palindromemordnilap:

thebobmaster:
Again, it's not bad that Captain Marvel is that powerful in the long term, as it really shows how serious a situation is if Captain Marvel is required to deal with it. For this particular threat, though, it was essentially Shaquille O'Neal facing off against Peter Dinklage in a one-on-one game of basketball. There's not a whole lot of tension when one person has a total advantage in every conceivable way.

I'm wondering just how long term that power is though. Her powers let her absorb energy not just project it, its why the theme of "when she falls, she gets back up" works for the film so well; its not just a "girl power!" thing, its literally telling you how her abilities work. You hit her, she takes it, she comes back stronger. And right before the finale the Supreme Intelligence hits her with a big ol' energy blast that lets her eat the power supply of an entire imperial star cruiser, so she goes into that fight with a tank full of juice. Might be that if she's going to exert herself she might need topping up from time to time

Hopefully, that is the path they take with her. I wasn't completely sure, watching the film, if she was actually absorbing energy to redirect or powering herself up through sheer willpower. If the former, that could be a completely reasonable way to balance her out. I know her powers in the comic are based on energy absorption and release, but comics do not necessarily inform the cinematic counterparts when it comes to sources of power.

thebobmaster:

Palindromemordnilap:

thebobmaster:
Again, it's not bad that Captain Marvel is that powerful in the long term, as it really shows how serious a situation is if Captain Marvel is required to deal with it. For this particular threat, though, it was essentially Shaquille O'Neal facing off against Peter Dinklage in a one-on-one game of basketball. There's not a whole lot of tension when one person has a total advantage in every conceivable way.

I'm wondering just how long term that power is though. Her powers let her absorb energy not just project it, its why the theme of "when she falls, she gets back up" works for the film so well; its not just a "girl power!" thing, its literally telling you how her abilities work. You hit her, she takes it, she comes back stronger. And right before the finale the Supreme Intelligence hits her with a big ol' energy blast that lets her eat the power supply of an entire imperial star cruiser, so she goes into that fight with a tank full of juice. Might be that if she's going to exert herself she might need topping up from time to time

Hopefully, that is the path they take with her. I wasn't completely sure, watching the film, if she was actually absorbing energy to redirect or powering herself up through sheer willpower. If the former, that could be a completely reasonable way to balance her out. I know her powers in the comic are based on energy absorption and release, but comics do not necessarily inform the cinematic counterparts when it comes to sources of power.

Pretty sure she's absorbing. They show the power on the entire ship flickering as she noms it up, every time Ronan's fighters blast her she has an easier time dealing with them, and when she lands to deal with Yonn-Rog you can see the pylons behind her crackling as she grabs the power from them too. The way they're showing it, her powers have a baseline they start at but have the potential to grow with potentially no real upper limit. Kind of like Hulk's strength

Thinking about it, the MCU never really explains anyone's powers all that well unless it serves the plot like Ant-Man's growing/shrinking or Black Panther'a suit.

Like Avengers 3 Tony pops up with a nano-machine suit that makes guns and shields and no one bats an eye. It's like "oh you invented mind controlled nanotech it must be the first Tuesday of the month". Dr Strange just has vague magic abilities that jumped from barely able to make a portal and weapons to total mastery of said powers in the space of two films.

Like even a throw away line about this shit would be nice so we all know what page we're on.

Just watched it today. Found it fairly mediocre.

Didn't particularly care for Brie Larson's acting. When the main character in your movie is also the worst acted it's kind of a problem.

Big CGI battle scenes have also gotten pretty stale for me. I used to really enjoy them when they were a novelty, but they've gotten to the point where they all kind of look the same in the Marvel Universe. I've come to realize that I really appreciate the lack of a proper big action battle in Guardians of the Galaxy 2. I mean, there's one there at the end, but you don't get to see it. As the action is happening you just hear characters interacting and trying to fix the bomb, because that's more interesting than whatever CGI fest is going on around them.

I originally criticized Guardians of the Galaxy 2 for not having any good action set-pieces, but looking back on it I think they made the right decision. Seeing Rocket and Yandu calmly pimp walk through the ship as bodies fall around them is much more visually interesting than something like Captain Marvel vs the Kree in the space lab.

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