There is no Director's Cut/Extended Cut of Mel Gibson's Braveheart right?

So long story short I am on a buying spree of Historical/Epic War movies that are very affordable for me to buy on Amazon.

At the moment I am getting Alexander, Kingdom of Heaven, Troy, and Braveheart.

But 3 of the movies I am getting their Director's Cut/Extended Editions, but I don't know if there is one for Braveheart as far as I checked on the internet.

So does that movie have a director's cut or no?

The cut where he actually farts lightnings? I think that was just a rumor. Supposedly Mel Gibson has a something like that in his possession (still no lightning farting tho), but there is no info on an extended/director cut released to the public.

CaitSeith:
The cut where he actually farts lightnings? I think that was just a rumor. Supposedly Mel Gibson has a something like that in his possession (still no lightning farting tho), but there is no info on an extended/director cut released to the public.

Welp, I am just gonna buy whats already on DVD/Blu-Ray at the moment. No idea what was cut from the movie that could make it better or worse. If its a whole other battle scene then yes.

Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

Here Comes Tomorrow:
Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

(Extremely) loosely based around the Battle of Bannockburn and the events before and after, but yeah, it's definitely not historically accurate. Always thought it was an entertaining movie, though.

I worked on a documentary on the battle a few years ago, filmed in Canada, as vfx supervisor/b roll director.

the December King:

Here Comes Tomorrow:
Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

(Extremely) loosely based around the Battle of Bannockburn and the events before and after, but yeah, it's definitely not historically accurate. Always thought it was an entertaining movie, though.

I worked on a documentary on the battle a few years ago, filmed in Canada, as vfx supervisor/b roll director.

I find very few films that say they are based on this or that are more like inspired by as they often take liberal use of the events to fit the story they want to tell. This ranges from having a white guy play a Latino in Argo, to combining two different historyical events such as in Patton when he slaps and then pulls a gun out on a shellshocked soldier.

Braveheart: Entertaining? Yes. A look into the past? Sure. Does it draw alot on myth on legend more than history, definitly.

Here Comes Tomorrow:
Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

CM156:

Here Comes Tomorrow:
Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

Was her Boyfriend French?

Samtemdo8:

CM156:

Here Comes Tomorrow:
Braveheart is about as historical as Game Of Thrones

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

Was her Boyfriend French?

He was an Englishman.

CM156:

Samtemdo8:

CM156:

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

Was her Boyfriend French?

He was an Englishman.

I am wondering if we will get an Attila the Hun movie on the budget and spectacle level of movies like Kingdom of Heaven and Alexander.

CM156:

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

But potentially difficult for adaptation, because he could make for an unsympathetic lead - often cruel, bad-tempered and even unpredictably violent. Although perhaps much of that could be explained by his need to desire the nobility, who had been running rampant over his father's reign.

Braveheart of course turns him into a cartoon villain; worst perhaps is that he was a highly competent general and soldier, and the movie won't even grant him that.

Agema:

CM156:

I'd kill for a historically accurate story of Edward I and his life, from his childhood as son of an incompetent king (Henry III was so bad, but good for the development of the English Constitution) to his wars in the Holy Land, to his wars against the Welsh, French, and Scots. And then he died, his son took over, and his son was later deposed by his wife and his wife's boyfriend.

Such an amazing story.

But potentially difficult for adaptation, because he could make for an unsympathetic lead - often cruel, bad-tempered and even unpredictably violent. Although perhaps much of that could be explained by his need to desire the nobility, who had been running rampant over his father's reign.

Braveheart of course turns him into a cartoon villain; worst perhaps is that he was a highly competent general and soldier, and the movie won't even grant him that.

Yeah, Longshanks exiled Jews from England if I recall.

Samtemdo8:
Yeah, Longshanks exiled Jews from England if I recall.

Indeed he did. I suspect like many monarchs if he wasn't particularly antisemitic himself - surely he'll have been at least somewhat antisemitic as just about everyone was in those days - he was motivated by money (property confiscation) and a cheap and easy way to win favour with his subjects.

Very few Jews had ever moved to England by that point - there were perhaps a few thousand - and there's evidence that suggests some Jews stayed and continued practicing in secret, as there was a mission for converts from Judaism which continued with occasional admissions for centuries. Jews were unofficially tolerated by the 1600s, and by the mid-1600s it was made plain the law against them would not be enforced (although it technically remained on the books for another two centuries).

You have to wonder if someone out there Mel has an extended cut of Braveheart with a game of Where's Wally in it, like he did for Apocalypto (seriously, google it).

saint of m:
I find very few films that say they are based on this or that are more like inspired by as they often take liberal use of the events to fit the story they want to tell. This ranges from having a white guy play a Latino in Argo...

Aside from... the whole stealing Canada's history and making it a United States rescue thing?

Squilookle:
Aside from... the whole stealing Canada's history and making it a United States rescue thing?

Ah, Canada's just a mostly autonomous region of the USA ;)

The USA will rectify that eventually by rolling the tanks over the border anyway.

Agema:
But potentially difficult for adaptation, because he could make for an unsympathetic lead - often cruel, bad-tempered and even unpredictably violent. Although perhaps much of that could be explained by his need to desire the nobility, who had been running rampant over his father's reign.

I think you hit the nail on the head there. His father's weakness and the imprisonment they both suffered under Simon de Montfort was clearly an influence on him. And I think audiences could at least relate to a character who does extreme things for an arguably understandable reason.

I am thinking of Mark Ryder's portrayal of Caesare Borgia as an example of this sort of characterization.

Agema:

Squilookle:
Aside from... the whole stealing Canada's history and making it a United States rescue thing?

Ah, Canada's just a mostly autonomous region of the USA ;)

The USA will rectify that eventually by rolling the tanks over the border anyway.

That's roughly what the U.S. thought in 1812, too. Nek Minnit- the White House gets burned to the ground.

 

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