Bad Endings vs. Non Endings

So, little hypothetical for you:

Series A: "I really like this series. Started off good, kept good...but the ending was bad. Really bad. So bad that it might have tainted the rest of the series for me."

Series B: "This series is good. Started good, kept good...only it was never finished. Damn it!"

There's no shortage of real world examples for both of these scenarios, and I'm sure that you all have your personal examples. Question is, which would you say irritates you more? Or, outside that, what would you say is worse - a series with a terrible ending, or a series that never has an ending (leaving unfulfilled plot points and all that)?

Personally speaking, on average, I'd say the Series B scenario tends to irritate me more. I can certainly name plenty of series that I thought ended badly, but if I had to choose, I'd generally take a bad ending over no ending at all. You could certainly say that the lack of an ending gives you the freedom to imagine your own, and that's true, but I can imagine a lot of things, it doesn't make them true. And if I look at bad endings, I can't think of many where I can say "oh, if only they'd stopped there, it would be better." Note that this isn't the same thing as artificially extending a series that ended naturally, which is a different conversation, more outright cancellation that leaves a story hanging.

Still, that's just me. How do you roll on this?

A bad ending is at least closure, without which the story will always feel hollow. Of the endings i consider bad endings, it was usually because of the endgame, the plot adopting a pace that does not serve the narrative well, whether too fast or too slow. when i wish series had ended earlier, i usually wish that in the sense that I wish a earlier part of the story had lead more directly to the conclusion so that there would not be a need for the unsatisfying final arc inbetween, for example the Shinobi War Arc in Naruto. I've seen a fair few shows where, if asked how to improve the ending, my solution would have been to cut a subplot, or even an entire season to achieve closure at a better pace. Non-endings satisfy no one but narcicistic fan-fic writers who either think they alone 'get' the creator's mindset and could replicate a perfect carbon copy of the 'true ending' or view themselves as better writers who would have come up with something better no matter what. They are all wrong, every time

What even was the last videogame series that "ended" at all? Everything always keeps going either via spin-off or soft reboot like inFAMOUS or Mass Effect or simply due to the anthological format of the series, like Mario or GTA or Assassin's Creed. There's always one more.

The closest thing to a series "ending" is a series getting cancelled, which is tantamount to a non-ending.

Depends on how long a series has been going. If it only has 10 episodes/chapters and then just gets cut off without an ending I'd get fucking pissed. If it's been going for 10+ years without an ending I probably wouldn't care too much, because by that time I'll either have gotten tired of it or the quality will have gone down significantly. Like for instance, I wouldn't care if Berserk never got an ending.

And there have been instances where I'd rather the series had stayed in a state of being uncompleted than the ending we got. Like Prison School, which was just the biggest middle finger to the reader.

I don't love a series having no ending, but at least I can understand it. Fact is, sometimes the series gets pulled, real life jumps the creators, or shit just goes wrong. I can't blame anybody for that - I don't work for free and I don't expect others to, so beyond a creator tantrum its hard for me to get upset about a missing ending. Chances are there was a good reason for it.

A shitty ending sucks because of course it does, but its rare for an ending to be shitty because the writer clocked out. A lot of times its the best they can actually do whether they aren't that skilled of writers or they got stuck in a corner or they can't turn hay into gold, and I find it easy to dismiss on the basis that the series probably wasn't as good as I thought it was if the ending sucked so hard. A lot of series carry themselves on big kabooms, dramatic twists, serialized monsters of the week, or extreme forward momentum, but those aren't that hard to write and even though they're entertaining they probably aren't the peak of today's media. Any of those having a crappy ending shouldn't be surprising because as much as I liked the big fights in DBZ or Naruto, or enjoyed seeing Inspector Frost be upset at people for telling porkies those series don't lend themselves to a satisfying conclusion because what you liked about the series can't be easily bashed into the shape of an ending. You get the "even BIGGER fight" or "even CRAZIER porkies" but they've been doing that over and over for years to keep the series going in the first place so an ending involving the actual content of the series is gonna feel like a lead in to next season no matter what.

Which brings me to the thing I actually hate the most... When you have an ending that's a sequel hook or you have an ending and then it cuts to a new bad guy giggling or a secret backup plan being activated. Two cartoon examples being Shadow Warriors and Reboot for me - they had adequate endings. Pretty good if a little forced, and they what do you know they have to throw in a crazy twist and then NEVER get another season. I would take a shitty ending or a sudden cut to black any day. Even though the Sopranos might be able to fuck themselves.

Hawki:
So, little hypothetical for you:

Series A: "I really like this series. Started off good, kept good...but the ending was bad. Really bad. So bad that it might have tainted the rest of the series for me."

Series B: "This series is good. Started good, kept good...only it was never finished. Damn it!"

Still, that's just me. How do you roll on this?

Do you mean unfinished as in it wasn't ended at all, for instance axed before the writers were ready? Or do you mean an open ending, without loose ends tied up?

In the latter case, I much prefer an open ending over a bad ending.

In the former case... hard to say. There is a huge frustration in an incomplete story, but it's not necessarily the ending itself, but can be the lack of general development or amount of story not told. If you imagined a stock hack fantasy that ended just before the hero plus magic sword took on the dark lord, you've pretty much got all the story and could do without the final confrontation. If you stopped at the end of book 2 of a trilogy, that would in my view be much more annoying and I'd rather take a bad ending.

A Bad ending Vs. Non Ending example I've experienced would be Toriko vs. Log Horizon.
Both were great, but Toriko's ending was so bad and out of left field that I actually just avoided the very last episode because none of it was in-line with the canon or story.
Log Horizon never got a third season, but I'm still wishing it continues purely to the fact it still kept that same level of quality throughout.

In a nutshell, Log Horizon would get my recommendation over Toriko purely because of the ending. A non-ending at least doesn't leave you sour.

Series A = The ending made me so mad that I forgot that I enjoyed 95% of it, fuck this show/game/movie/whatever I'm going to wipe it from my memory. Every time I hear this series mentioned, I get angry.

Series B = I enjoyed 100% percent of it, I wish there was more. I'm going to look for content and discussions online, whatever obscure background info to fill the void.

Non-ending is clearly superior.

A non-ending just lets me imagine what else might be going on. A bad ending tells me and I hate it

CyanCat47:
Non-endings satisfy no one but narcicistic fan-fic writers who either think they alone 'get' the creator's mindset and could replicate a perfect carbon copy of the 'true ending' or view themselves as better writers who would have come up with something better no matter what. They are all wrong, every time

:(

Johnny Novgorod:
What even was the last videogame series that "ended" at all?

The closest thing to a series "ending" is a series getting cancelled, which is tantamount to a non-ending.

Excluding cancellations and 'artificial extensions'?

-BioShock (course that'll change if BioShock 4 is made)

-Command & Conquer (Tiberian series)

-Dark Souls

-Jak & Daxter

-Killzone (sort of, at least in the sense that there hasn't been a game post-Shadow Fall, and the series arguably doesn't need one)

-Marathon

-Metal Gear (debatable if this falls into "cancelled" territory though in terms of narrative)

-Metroid (discounting prequels)

-Resistance (same as Metal Gear)

-Spyro the Dragon (original and LoS series, though granted, the original had more of a string continuity)

-Star Fox (as in the continuity between Lylat Wars and Command)

-Uncharted

Granted, a lot of these are stretches, and there's many series that had definitive endings that were only continued after said ending.

Agema:

Do you mean unfinished as in it wasn't ended at all, for instance axed before the writers were ready? Or do you mean an open ending, without loose ends tied up?

In the latter case, I much prefer an open ending over a bad ending.

The former. An open ending I can live with, especially if the ending itself is meant to be ambiguous in at least some aspects.

I loved Carnivale (2003, two seasons), but it never ended, and I sorely needed more. On the other hand, I felt like the ending to Lost was... dumb, and made everything I had seen before dumber for it- it tainted my memories.

Speaking of 'it', on the other, other hand, I thought the original mini-series (Stephen King's It, 1990) was great, even with a strangely unnecessary giant spider fight at the end.

But I may have been braced for that, as I think I had read the book just prior.

the December King:
I loved Carnivale (2003, two seasons), but it never ended, and I sorely needed more. On the other hand, I felt like the ending to Lost was... dumb, and made everything I had seen before dumber for it- it tainted my memories.

Carnivale was supposed to have 6 seasons divided into 3 arcs(each in a different time period, the last one being in the mid 1940's and ending with the Atomic Bomb test). Instead, it was cut to 2 and they had to slap an ending on it to bring it to some kind of closure, at least that's what I've read.

Yeah, it's hard to choose. With no ending you can just kinda draw your own conclusion and imagine the rest for yourself, which honestly is better then the real ending half the time anyway. Imagining what something could be is often far more interesting then what we end up getting when except when something is handled by either a good writer or planned out well in advance. Though it's always frustrating in cases where a show or something is cut off. Apparently due to Invader Zim's run being cut off mid season, a lot of cool sounding episodes(Gir apparently conquered the earth while Zim was off planet in one, and not Duty Gir either) got left unfinished and it makes me sad.

A bad ending, OTOH, at least brings a sense of closure.

Hawki:

-Metal Gear (debatable if this falls into "cancelled" territory though in terms of narrative)

Considering how schizophrenic the narrative is in the series, even with the mess MGSV is(and honestly, one could ignore MGSV and not miss anything considering), one can make a pretty good argument that the story is more or less told. There's plenty of things that either aren't followed up on or needed to be better explained, but there is a sense of completeness as a far as the big plot beats are concerned.

I really can't blame Konami for what happened to MGSV. Kojima had 5 years to work on the thing and even without Act 2 being woefully incomplete, the whole thing feels like a waste of potential(even leaving aside the big twist). Konami eventually had to call it and ship.

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:
What even was the last videogame series that "ended" at all?

The closest thing to a series "ending" is a series getting cancelled, which is tantamount to a non-ending.

Excluding cancellations and 'artificial extensions'?

-BioShock (course that'll change if BioShock 4 is made)

-Command & Conquer (Tiberian series)

-Dark Souls

-Jak & Daxter

-Killzone (sort of, at least in the sense that there hasn't been a game post-Shadow Fall, and the series arguably doesn't need one)

-Marathon

-Metal Gear (debatable if this falls into "cancelled" territory though in terms of narrative)

-Metroid (discounting prequels)

-Resistance (same as Metal Gear)

-Spyro the Dragon (original and LoS series, though granted, the original had more of a string continuity)

-Star Fox (as in the continuity between Lylat Wars and Command)

-Uncharted

Granted, a lot of these are stretches, and there's many series that had definitive endings that were only continued after said ending.

I tihnk in most of these cases there isn't a proper conclusion because there's no story to conclude, sequels keeps getting made on spec until interest dies out and the series is either forgotten or officially cancelled. So maybe Dark Souls is over, in the sense that there aren't any more games with that title coming out, but there's no overarching story to end; a hypothetical Dark Souls 4 doesn't need to justify its continued existence because narrative continuity is a joke to the series (and endless repetition is a motif anyway.

The only two series out of that list I'd say come close to ending are BioShock and Uncharted but even both have fluked the sense of finality by pushing spin-off games that continue the main story one way or another.

Considering how fundamental the Ending is to the whole structure of a story, I'd take a poor ending over no ending every time. If it's a story based series, and you have me onboard with that story, then finish your damn vegetables and wrap the story up.

I'd go further and say games should never be allowed to end on cliffhangers. Considering how fickle producers are and how fraught with danger a first game is when it comes to being allowed to start a sequel, unless it's already been greenlit before the first one releases, you just don't do a cliffhanger. Just don't do it. Too many games have promised the moon, rolled credits, and were never heard from again. And it sucks.

Squilookle:
Considering how fundamental the Ending is to the whole structure of a story

Is it actually, or is that just convention? Why should fiction require this structure when history clearly doesn't?

Seanchaidh:

Squilookle:
Considering how fundamental the Ending is to the whole structure of a story

Is it actually, or is that just convention? Why should fiction require this structure when history clearly doesn't?

Because at some point, an audience likes to return to living their lives.

Life itself is not subject to such a restriction.

Life is a tangled labyrinth entirely built off frayed absence of closure, it's hardly difficult to accustom to the same in entertainment. The imagination is a wonderful thing. A bad ending is not. There may be exceptions depending on circumstance, but you can't forget a shit ending; it taints the rest of the experience as whenever you look back you can't not think of where the narrative leads. Also, there are more than a few stories that don't follow traditional structure and to the layperson would appear as not having a traditional ending. The ones that linger in the mind long after.

Good question.

For me, A doesn't bother me much at all. People place so much importance on how a story ends... and I don't get it. Generally the ending of a story (in traditional 3 act structure) is the shortest part that just has the resolution and wrap up. Act 2 generally has all of the interesting build up, and I place way more importance on it and its transfer points between acts. Or, the journey is just as important as the destination. I can't understand anyone who could denounce 90 minutes of a great movie because of the 15 minutes of its bad ending.

And just as important, a story isn't told until it has an ending. That's why I prefer... say anime that has an ending as opposed to those shonen series that go on and on and on and on with no ending in sight. I can't stand that. That's (strangely) why I prefer episodic style tv shows as opposed to those with long story arcs. Episodic shows have proper story structure... every episode. Every episode has a beginning, middle, end. With long story arc shows they either break up the structure unnaturally with ending the story wherever time runs out for the episode... which is unbearably awkward, or trying (and usually failing) to give each ep proper structure WHILE keeping the arc going. Which is appearantly VERY hard to do as few shows reliably do it well and most have to rely on the crutch of a "previously on" segment as an opening scene. So b is worse.

I would prefer a story with no ending over one with an abysmal ending. The most common of the former is a TV show or game series that gets cancelled before it can finish, but then I can just imagine my own ending, and it's usually better than anything the producers could have made on short notice.

I have witnessed some very, very bad, rushed endings to games, shows and book series' that would have been far better off left to the audience. Of course with games you never really know if they might try to resurrect it later- no ending is final enough to prevent that if the series is popular.

I believe the classic adage of showbusiness is "Always leave them wanting more"

Dalisclock:
I really can't blame Konami for what happened to MGSV. Kojima had 5 years to work on the thing and even without Act 2 being woefully incomplete, the whole thing feels like a waste of potential(even leaving aside the big twist). Konami eventually had to call it and ship.

This...actually wasn't the case. Yes it's about PT, but this video actually elaborates a little on the backstory and Kojima's position within Konami.

Konami Holdings was in no financial trouble at all. KDE was posting "poor" earnings, but at the same time they were growing by acquiring smaller studios, not contracting. Konami didn't actually "have" to do anything, MGSV is what it is due to corporate politics, and the time and money spent developing the Fox engine (which is what "weighed down" MGSV's development) went to waste thanks to it.

Squilookle:

Seanchaidh:

Squilookle:
Considering how fundamental the Ending is to the whole structure of a story

Is it actually, or is that just convention? Why should fiction require this structure when history clearly doesn't?

Because at some point, an audience likes to return to living their lives.

Life itself is not subject to such a restriction.

Why does this require an Ending with a capital E?

The only reason people complain about bad endings is because good endings exist. I prefer the series to attempt to do a good ending than no ending at all.

Silent Protagonist:
I believe the classic adage of showbusiness is "Always leave them wanting more"

Lately it tends to just be "Always leave them wanting"

WhiteFangofWhoa:
Of course with games you never really know if they might try to resurrect it later- no ending is final enough to prevent that if the series is popular.

I'd say that's true of every media.

Eacaraxe:

Dalisclock:
I really can't blame Konami for what happened to MGSV. Kojima had 5 years to work on the thing and even without Act 2 being woefully incomplete, the whole thing feels like a waste of potential(even leaving aside the big twist). Konami eventually had to call it and ship.

This...actually wasn't the case. Yes it's about PT, but this video actually elaborates a little on the backstory and Kojima's position within Konami.

Konami Holdings was in no financial trouble at all. KDE was posting "poor" earnings, but at the same time they were growing by acquiring smaller studios, not contracting. Konami didn't actually "have" to do anything, MGSV is what it is due to corporate politics, and the time and money spent developing the Fox engine (which is what "weighed down" MGSV's development) went to waste thanks to it.

THere's no video there.

I'll watch it when I get a chance and while I respect Kojima to a point, the man does have a tendency to disappear up his own ass a lot. One has to question how one develops a game for 5 years and have half of it done. Yes, a substantial amount of it was devoted to the Fox Engine development, but seriously, ACt 2 was woefully incomplete and most of the good story bits were relegated to the audio tapes. The whole Cipher plot alluded to in Ground Zeros and the end of Peace Walker? Pretty much the only time it comes up in game is during Skull Faces fucking monologue in the jeep. XOF? Shows up in the Fortess mission and the hospital, and the rest of the time it's random mooks with some super parasite zombies tossed in. The Whole Premise of "This is the Fall of Big Boss/This is the transition between Naked Snake and Big Boss the Big Bad" pretty much happen off screen(and Peace Walker basically already did it). None of that strikes me as him having the dev time pulled out from under him.

Maybe if Konami had given him another 5 years, it would have been a complete game but as it stands, it was apparently 5 years of FOX Engine development and some great on the groundplay with a ramshackle plot and a empty open world bolted on. They didn't have to tell him it was time to ship and while I fucking hate to defend Konami in anything, I can only imagine they wanted to see a game ship and a deadline was set.

They can still fuck off for PT and MG:Survive was a pitiful use for the excellent FOX engine, but it's hard to blame them for telling the man to wrap it up.

For me, it varies. Sometimes I prefer a non-ending over a shitty ending, if the shitty ending derails the plot, characters, or themes the show/game/manga was going for. Case in point, Shaman King (manga), Star Vs. TFOE, Gurren Lagaan, and Legend of Korra. Shaman King (manga version) had a gainax/non-ending in 2005, and we did not get an actual ending until 2009. Leaving the manga in a long hiatus. 4 years wasted, because the author got a bug up his ass about humanity/nature and all of sudden we're supposed to feel sorry about Hao Asakura (main villain) who has killed over 1000 people, because he lost his goddamned mommy. The manga got more preachy, certain characters were acting out the character, the stakes were less interesting since nearly every character would get revived instantly when killed, and a fuck you of an ending. This is one of those cases where the show is better than the manga. The anime had a decent ending, but looks even better by comparison.

Star and LoK had an suffered from having the bad or cliche romance take over at the expense of the actual plot or interesting side characters. Star suffered even more in this regard, thanks to losing the writer from season 2. Once he left, writing issues became more prevalent, and the whole git rid of all magic is written as a good thing when, there are many innocent beings composed a magic who will die. The only reason it's a "good" thing is because Marco and Star will finally be together. Raspberry noises with tongue! Cry me a river. Korra I've ranted enough times, so I will look for a link of all the things I've said later.

Gurren Lagann's ending was an ass pull and came out of nowhere and that is all I have to say to that. The only time a non-ending works is for Big O's 2nd season. There was supposed to be a third season that explains the craziness, but due to funding and ratings, they could not get one. While sad, I prefer it this way because trying to explain all of the craziness in S2 would feel unsatisfactory and destroy the mystery. Otherwise, S2 had a fitting end in my eyes.

Kyrian007:

And just as important, a story isn't told until it has an ending. That's why I prefer... say anime that has an ending as opposed to those shonen series that go on and on and on and on with no ending in sight. I can't stand that. That's (strangely) why I prefer episodic style tv shows as opposed to those with long story arcs. Episodic shows have proper story structure... every episode. Every episode has a beginning, middle, end. With long story arc shows they either break up the structure unnaturally with ending the story wherever time runs out for the episode... which is unbearably awkward, or trying (and usually failing) to give each ep proper structure WHILE keeping the arc going. Which is apparently VERY hard to do as few shows reliably do it well and most have to rely on the crutch of a "previously on" segment as an opening scene. So b is worse.

Shaman King's ending in the manga is pretty much why I dropped most shounen shows/manga in general. The only shounen I keep up with is My Hero Academia, and that is mostly, because I like Midoryia so much. Precious cinnamon bun. To me, the only shonen series with satisfying endings are Yu Yu Hakusho (anime adaption), Fist of the Northstar, the original Yu-gi-Oh, and JoJo Parts 1-4. Long running seinen and shoujo series can also suffer from this too, but I am well less versed in the latter. Gunsmith Cats being a big example.

CyanCat47:
A bad ending is at least closure, without which the story will always feel hollow. Of the endings i consider bad endings, it was usually because of the endgame, the plot adopting a pace that does not serve the narrative well, whether too fast or too slow. when i wish series had ended earlier, i usually wish that in the sense that I wish a earlier part of the story had lead more directly to the conclusion so that there would not be a need for the unsatisfying final arc inbetween, for example the Shinobi War Arc in Naruto. I've seen a fair few shows where, if asked how to improve the ending, my solution would have been to cut a subplot, or even an entire season to achieve closure at a better pace. Non-endings satisfy no one but narcicistic fan-fic writers who either think they alone 'get' the creator's mindset and could replicate a perfect carbon copy of the 'true ending' or view themselves as better writers who would have come up with something better no matter what. They are all wrong, every time

The funny thing is, I've seen fan fic writers pull off better endings for Naruto and others shows than the actual creators themselves.

It doesn't really bother me much either way these days. I don't know if it's just from getting older or what, but I don't invest my identity into my entertainment, so if it's bad or less than I hoped for, it doesn't really bother me much. Sure to some degree I'm disappointed, but for the most part I just shrug and go "meh, that was less than ideal."

So either outcome is pretty equally "meh" in my book. Maybe the Bad Ending carries a bit more weight, simply because it feels like a big wet turd flopping on the table at the end, but it usually doesn't make the rest of the show unwatchable for me.

Dalisclock:
Snip.

Oh, stupid video player, here's a link.

The TLDR is Kojima's contract was for two-year periods, renewed on odd years. The video creator theorizes the actual shit went down in 2013; by that point the mobile gaming division's takeover was complete, and when Kojima's contract was up for renewal, Konami extended it one final time to save face and for him to complete MGSV. But, internally, Silent Hills was effectively canceled, and Kojima was all but "officially" fired having his influence and decision-making powers stripped, in 2013.

From there, the author theorizes PT was never actually intended to be released. Kojima repurposed the Fox engine tech demo and the proof-of-concept build he showed to del Toro, Refn, Reedus, and Mikkelsen to make a coded whistle-blow against Konami's management, and went over management's head to get it pushed to the Sony marketplace. That infuriated Konami's management, and that's when they restricted Kojima to his office, isolated him from his development team, and started the Big Brother shit.

I don't necessarily agree with all the author's conclusions, but we do know from other sources and third parties about the slapfight between Kojima and the mobile games division, and the mobile games division's takeover of KDE. And, that necessarily impacted MGSV's development, and everything does seem to have blown up around the time of PT's release.

I think a more likely scenario is Konami fully intended to move forward with Silent Hills, but not extend Kojima's contract in 2015. This way they'd have Kojima doing the heavy design lifting, but he'd be out before it was time to start development, letting them stick Kojima's name on the game without it being "his". Kojima went off the reservation remaking PT as the fuck-you letter, then Konami dropped the hammer on him.

The end result of this relevant to MGSV, was it had probably two years' less real development time than it actually appeared to have (once you account for Fox engine's development). Ground Zeroes was clearly not intended to be released as its own product and pushed out the door to recoup Fox engine development losses, and it was the start of Kojima's subtle anti-Konami messaging. Konami probably mandated KojiPro halt development on MGSV overall to polish the Guantanamo Bay segment and make filler content, so that it could be released separately. And, once PT came out and Kojima was separated from his development team, the order probably went out to halt development on further content, pad, and polish without direction.

Honestly, I think the "mission 51" content is something of the smoking gun there. The "Kingdom of the Flies" segment, as described, would almost have certainly required multiple missions (three or four maybe), and its own map at least on the scale of Camp Omega. Then you have the cutscenes in Chapter 2 that seem to have been intended to accompany missions of their own. Adding that together, plus the Camp Omega segment, it would have been a single game, with a cohesive narrative, with four major locations and about 50-51 missions.

I don't think this is one place where you can reasonably blame Kojima. Like his methods and development philosophy or not, he was drug into an office politics struggle nevertheless, and management did meddle heavily in MGSV's development process. This wasn't just a case of KDE's management telling him to wrap it up, and to be frank if Kojima had just been allowed to do his job it's entirely possible the game would have released, complete, in 2015 anyways.

As someone who watches too much anime, there's way too many incomplete adaptations out there which I inadvertently end up watching. Unless I want to get into the source material, there's often little recourse. And sometimes the source material itself is something unfinished, or a novel which may not have translations and I personally do not enjoy reading light novels.

It doesn't help that Japanese source material are largely serialized, and will pretty much only ever end if it gets axed. And typically the creator isn't given that much time to wrap up, so many endings are either left open or hastily concluded with many plot holes.

I get on with life by moving onto the next piece of entertainment. There is really little sense obsessing over it. I still need to occupy and entertain myself otherwise.

Depending on the nature of the "non-ending" I might be still okay. If they resolve all immediate plot threads and kinda do a whole "life goes on" - I'm typically alright. Also kinda depends on the premise of the show. If it is a light hearted play it loose sorta premise, these sorta endings can kinda fit and be okay. Something straight up and very obviously unfinished however is going to suck.

Bad endings however, always sour the hell out of me and completely repaint my opinion of the entire thing and will affect my decision to revisit the piece of media or not. Mass Effect and Game of Thrones comes to mind.

I think I'm more okay with non-ends since I think I'm more easily able to move on and typically forget about the entire affair. Bad endings kinda... stick and feel more hard to get over. But only if I liked it enough.

But overall, there's always more shows to watch. More games to play. There's long running stuff I actually started but couldn't be arsed to continue with or lost interest in, so in essence I have 'self inflicted' a bunch of non-endings upon myself.

CoCage:
For me, it varies. Sometimes I prefer a non-ending over a shitty ending, if the shitty ending derails the plot, characters, or themes the show/game/manga was going for. Case in point, Shaman King (manga), Star Vs. TFOE, Gurren Lagaan, and Legend of Korra. Shaman King (manga version) had a gainax/non-ending in 2005, and we did not get an actual ending until 2009. Leaving the manga in a long hiatus. 4 years wasted, because the author got a bug up his ass about humanity/nature and all of sudden we're supposed to feel sorry about Hao Asakura (main villain) who has killed over 1000 people, because he lost his goddamned mommy. The manga got more preachy, certain characters were acting out the character, the stakes were less interesting since nearly every character would get revived instantly when killed, and a fuck you of an ending. This is one of those cases where the show is better than the manga. The anime had a decent ending, but looks even better by comparison.

Star and LoK had an suffered from having the bad or cliche romance take over at the expense of the actual plot or interesting side characters. Star suffered even more in this regard, thanks to losing the writer from season 2. Once he left, writing issues became more prevalent, and the whole git rid of all magic is written as a good thing when, there are many innocent beings composed a magic who will die. The only reason it's a "good" thing is because Marco and Star will finally be together. Raspberry noises with tongue! Cry me a river. Korra I've ranted enough times, so I will look for a link of all the things I've said later.

Gurren Lagann's ending was an ass pull and came out of nowhere and that is all I have to say to that. The only time a non-ending works is for Big O's 2nd season. There was supposed to be a third season that explains the craziness, but due to funding and ratings, they could not get one. While sad, I prefer it this way because trying to explain all of the craziness in S2 would feel unsatisfactory and destroy the mystery. Otherwise, S2 had a fitting end in my eyes.

Kyrian007:

And just as important, a story isn't told until it has an ending. That's why I prefer... say anime that has an ending as opposed to those shonen series that go on and on and on and on with no ending in sight. I can't stand that. That's (strangely) why I prefer episodic style tv shows as opposed to those with long story arcs. Episodic shows have proper story structure... every episode. Every episode has a beginning, middle, end. With long story arc shows they either break up the structure unnaturally with ending the story wherever time runs out for the episode... which is unbearably awkward, or trying (and usually failing) to give each ep proper structure WHILE keeping the arc going. Which is apparently VERY hard to do as few shows reliably do it well and most have to rely on the crutch of a "previously on" segment as an opening scene. So b is worse.

Shaman King's ending in the manga is pretty much why I dropped most shounen shows/manga in general. The only shounen I keep up with is My Hero Academia, and that is mostly, because I like Midoryia so much. Precious cinnamon bun. To me, the only shonen series with satisfying endings are Yu Yu Hakusho (anime adaption), Fist of the Northstar, the original Yu-gi-Oh, and JoJo Parts 1-4. Long running seinen and shoujo series can also suffer from this too, but I am well less versed in the latter. Gunsmith Cats being a big example.

CyanCat47:
A bad ending is at least closure, without which the story will always feel hollow. Of the endings i consider bad endings, it was usually because of the endgame, the plot adopting a pace that does not serve the narrative well, whether too fast or too slow. when i wish series had ended earlier, i usually wish that in the sense that I wish a earlier part of the story had lead more directly to the conclusion so that there would not be a need for the unsatisfying final arc inbetween, for example the Shinobi War Arc in Naruto. I've seen a fair few shows where, if asked how to improve the ending, my solution would have been to cut a subplot, or even an entire season to achieve closure at a better pace. Non-endings satisfy no one but narcicistic fan-fic writers who either think they alone 'get' the creator's mindset and could replicate a perfect carbon copy of the 'true ending' or view themselves as better writers who would have come up with something better no matter what. They are all wrong, every time

The funny thing is, I've seen fan fic writers pull off better endings for Naruto and others shows than the actual creators themselves.

Because they can just edit someone else's work using pre-established characters with the actual series already doing part of the the trial and error process for them. I sincerely doubt any of them would accomplish much on a weekly deadline

CyanCat47:

CoCage:
For me, it varies. Sometimes I prefer a non-ending over a shitty ending, if the shitty ending derails the plot, characters, or themes the show/game/manga was going for. Case in point, Shaman King (manga), Star Vs. TFOE, Gurren Lagaan, and Legend of Korra. Shaman King (manga version) had a gainax/non-ending in 2005, and we did not get an actual ending until 2009. Leaving the manga in a long hiatus. 4 years wasted, because the author got a bug up his ass about humanity/nature and all of sudden we're supposed to feel sorry about Hao Asakura (main villain) who has killed over 1000 people, because he lost his goddamned mommy. The manga got more preachy, certain characters were acting out the character, the stakes were less interesting since nearly every character would get revived instantly when killed, and a fuck you of an ending. This is one of those cases where the show is better than the manga. The anime had a decent ending, but looks even better by comparison.

Star and LoK had an suffered from having the bad or cliche romance take over at the expense of the actual plot or interesting side characters. Star suffered even more in this regard, thanks to losing the writer from season 2. Once he left, writing issues became more prevalent, and the whole git rid of all magic is written as a good thing when, there are many innocent beings composed a magic who will die. The only reason it's a "good" thing is because Marco and Star will finally be together. Raspberry noises with tongue! Cry me a river. Korra I've ranted enough times, so I will look for a link of all the things I've said later.

Gurren Lagann's ending was an ass pull and came out of nowhere and that is all I have to say to that. The only time a non-ending works is for Big O's 2nd season. There was supposed to be a third season that explains the craziness, but due to funding and ratings, they could not get one. While sad, I prefer it this way because trying to explain all of the craziness in S2 would feel unsatisfactory and destroy the mystery. Otherwise, S2 had a fitting end in my eyes.

Kyrian007:

And just as important, a story isn't told until it has an ending. That's why I prefer... say anime that has an ending as opposed to those shonen series that go on and on and on and on with no ending in sight. I can't stand that. That's (strangely) why I prefer episodic style tv shows as opposed to those with long story arcs. Episodic shows have proper story structure... every episode. Every episode has a beginning, middle, end. With long story arc shows they either break up the structure unnaturally with ending the story wherever time runs out for the episode... which is unbearably awkward, or trying (and usually failing) to give each ep proper structure WHILE keeping the arc going. Which is apparently VERY hard to do as few shows reliably do it well and most have to rely on the crutch of a "previously on" segment as an opening scene. So b is worse.

Shaman King's ending in the manga is pretty much why I dropped most shounen shows/manga in general. The only shounen I keep up with is My Hero Academia, and that is mostly, because I like Midoryia so much. Precious cinnamon bun. To me, the only shonen series with satisfying endings are Yu Yu Hakusho (anime adaption), Fist of the Northstar, the original Yu-gi-Oh, and JoJo Parts 1-4. Long running seinen and shoujo series can also suffer from this too, but I am well less versed in the latter. Gunsmith Cats being a big example.

CyanCat47:
A bad ending is at least closure, without which the story will always feel hollow. Of the endings i consider bad endings, it was usually because of the endgame, the plot adopting a pace that does not serve the narrative well, whether too fast or too slow. when i wish series had ended earlier, i usually wish that in the sense that I wish a earlier part of the story had lead more directly to the conclusion so that there would not be a need for the unsatisfying final arc inbetween, for example the Shinobi War Arc in Naruto. I've seen a fair few shows where, if asked how to improve the ending, my solution would have been to cut a subplot, or even an entire season to achieve closure at a better pace. Non-endings satisfy no one but narcicistic fan-fic writers who either think they alone 'get' the creator's mindset and could replicate a perfect carbon copy of the 'true ending' or view themselves as better writers who would have come up with something better no matter what. They are all wrong, every time

The funny thing is, I've seen fan fic writers pull off better endings for Naruto and others shows than the actual creators themselves.

Because they can just edit someone else's work using pre-established characters with the actual series already doing part of the the trial and error process for them. I sincerely doubt any of them would accomplish much on a weekly deadline

You have point, but some of these shows or manga still fucked up due to deadline, regardless if they were on point or not. Me personally, I don't care much if the fic writers use the characters to their full potential better than the official creator(s).

 

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