Popular misconceptions about your area(s) of expertise...

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Bit of a WWI buff myself - the thing that annoys me is that most people's understanding if the war seems to stem entirely from watching Blackadder Goes Forth.

The public assumption that Hague was a moron who never learnt anything and refused to move on from 19th Century Doctrine whilst ignored any and all technologically innovation in favour of glorious sweeping cavalry charges, and didn't give a damn about the lives of the men under his command...pretty much all bollocks

I study Biomedical Sciences, so the oft-heard misconceptions about human health, biology or science in general piss me off to no end:
-You only use 10% of your brain!
-Eating sugar makes you hyperactive!
-All the vaccination conspiracy loons

Oh, geez. Once I get started, I don't stop.

I'm a librarian. People have no fucking clue what we do.

I'm not even going to try to explain it... or even goggle or wikipedia it. Because I don't have to. Librarians were huge parts of building both of those, to begin with.

Seriously, I want to pick up a book and beat people's faces in when they think I just sit there and read books and check books in and out.

Want to know what a librarian does? Look it up. ... If you know how. After all, we're the ones that teach people how to do that... and the ones that create and maintain the search engines and web pages you're using. What? That has nothing to do with books? Librarians don't deal in just books - our job is information. Every goddamn aspect of information. Books just happen to have information in them. So do newspapers, magazines, the internet, governments, schools, businesses, law firms, hospitals, research centres, the UN... Look in any of those places (and more) and you'll find us there. We design databases, search engines, websites, copyright law, company protocols... pretty much everything we have our hands in, because we have the knowledge and skills, or you have to research things first. That or we just make things ourselves.

Gah. Now I've gone and riled myself up.

I need to get back to my spreadsheets and accounting. Because that's what I'm working on right now. Then it'll be statistics, then contacting local businesses for information/requests for documents, then dealing with invoices, tracking down annual reports, creating records for periodicals... maybe I'll touch a book later this week if I find the time to shelve some or recieve some in the mail that I ordered. Otherwise I'll be organizing emergency first aid training, monitoring climate conditions in the rare book room (which houses more than books), recording the tempratures and humidity levels from the hygothermograph and.... I'm to goddamn overworked.

Saulkar:

McMullen:
"Are you SURE this storyboard doesn't leave anything out?"

I am getting the impression that I may have to use that very statement sometime in the foreseeable future.

Let's call this my side business. I'm working with a client who is trying to modernize their material. We're talking things that were filmed in the 80's (you can see mullets!). And they decided to go with 3D and I got involved in the project. While the person knows more about the subject material than anyone I know, it creates some issues that she has no concept of anything with 3D. Luckily, she had admitted it and relied on me to forward the project myself. So I spent a little bit of energy explaining that the things she wants may be beyond her time frame and her budget, as well as exceedingly difficult for one person to do. (Quick plug, if anyone feels proficient with Rigging in Maya, I may be able to offer a brief gig for cheap labor)

As my day profession, since I work a rather technical field which tends to vary form day to day, I spend a great deal of time explaining why we can't do certain things or how I can't just flip a switch to make things magically happen.

I also enjoy watching movies that have some element to science and often find myself laughing at their ridiculous premise. I'm quite fond of how movies like Bond always seems to provide them the right tool for the right job in 5 minutes. When in gods name did they develop that stuff? And more aptly; who designed it? Why did they design it and how much did it cost?

Case in point, MI: Ghost Protocol (I know, I just watched it). The hallway screen. Seriously? Who's ass did they pull that out of in the span of 15minutes of 'story' time?

Miles Maldonado:
My area of expertise is tanks and overall weapons.

It's amazing who thinks that a tank can survive several penetrating hits (there are some freak incidences, but if it goes through it kills), and I actually had to prove (not the hard way, mind) that a flamethrower only lasted ten seconds or less, as opposed to minutes.

Tanks....YUM. Chobham armor FTW. Chobham with a layer of depleted uranium...drool.

I'm not an expert in anything, but at my last job I taught myself Excel. After 3 years, starting from scratch, I became the most knowledgeable person at my company with it. Interestingly, none of the freelance programmers that were hired for a side project could help me. The syntax is entirely different at the top layer, although it can use visual basic for complicated problems. Bearing that in mind, Excel is one of those programs where everyone uses it but don't understand how to use it best.

People don't realize that the real "work" in using Excel is realizing how you input data; as in dedicated columns for specific fields. You have to watch your typos, including dead spaces accidentally typed after characters, which have to be 'cleaned' out with TRIM or something. Too many people sharing sheets like a poor man's database when things like SQL and a web interface would have turned out best.

A sales manager wanted a territory map of the different counties in our state, so they approached the graphic designer on staff. He was taking forever, so I just took a high res image and traced over it using Excel's freeform drawing tool and got a perfectly scalable vector image--all during lunch. The company just kept buying new tools without realizing the potential of the tools we already had.

FizzyIzze:
Tanks....YUM. Chobham armor FTW. Chobham with a layer of depleted uranium...drool.

Slightly off topic... but do you know the construction of Chobham armour? (Spelt with a 'u'... it's British after all!)

And why would you want depleted uranium in vehicle armour, out of curiosity? o_O'

SecondPrize:
I guess the big misconception in photography is that anyone can do it. Your photos suck and you should feel bad. It's because you aren't even visually literate. You don't see illiterate folk writing novels do you? No you don't, because they can't fucking write. It's the same with you and photography. Stop handing a camera to your uncle Steve if it's an important event and hire a professional. Also, stop showing us bad photos.

Graphic Designer/Illustrator here, I feel your pain.

There's a misconception that visual arts are entirely subjective. They aren't.

Twilight_guy:
Computer Science. Every time someone in some medium is a "hacker" or "computer expert" they are usually using the power of bullshit and technobable. It's a really slow and boring field though so that's the way it goes.

While this may hold true in some areas of IT and Computing, it is quite the contrary for Computer Forensics and Security. Especially since a lot of espionage is done digitally now, as is sabotage and crime.

As many have mentioned in this thread already, I'd like to add a little spin to things:
Anyone can "hack" using some free software that does all the work for you, such as committing a DoS attack on a commercially available home router, but it take a genius to infiltrate robust systems AND get away with it.

disgruntledgamer:

Moose:
Graduated with a degree in Archaeology a few years back. The amount of people who had asked me if I had dug up any dinosaurs....

Are you serious? People confuse ancient human civilizations with paleontology.

Yeah it happens. I just tell them I don't dig deep enough to find dinosaurs. Saves me trying to explain that the study of dinosaurs is a different thing entirely.

Gabanuka:

Moose:
Graduated with a degree in Archaeology a few years back. The amount of people who had asked me if I had dug up any dinosaurs....

Ouch, I could see that one hurting. Have you been to any interesting digs?

I've actually only been on one and that was for part of my degree. Spent three weeks in a tent and all I found was soil and rocks. Shame I didn't take geology otherwise it would have been a good trip!

I study history. Specifically the medieval era, though I am also a WW2 buff on the side.

Armor is not ultra heavy and impossible to maneuver in (in fact you can mount a horse, cartwheel, and even swim in the stuff), swords are not extremely heavy and unwieldy, the Katana is an okay sword and not an amazing godlike one, the West has a huge documented martial arts tradition that may actually have more written records than the Eastern ones, English longbows cannot pierce plate armor, mail was more expensive than plate armor in later years, Voltaire's opinions on the Holy Roman Empire can go to hell, Vikings were not barbarians, the Muslim world was for most of history better than the Christian one, there is no such thing as "studded leather", what most people call "bastard swords" are actually called long swords and what people call long swords are actually arming swords, life wasn't as bad as people think it was, and on and on and on.

The average person has their entire view of the Middle Ages created through D&D and video games.

SckizoBoy:

FizzyIzze:
Tanks....YUM. Chobham armor FTW. Chobham with a layer of depleted uranium...drool.

Slightly off topic... but do you know the construction of Chobham armour? (Spelt with a 'u'... it's British after all!)

And why would you want depleted uranium in vehicle armour, out of curiosity? o_O'

Heh, I WISH I knew the components :), but it's a top secret formula after all, so it's none of my business.

:(

From what I understand, It was America that added the depleted uranium layer to the Chobham formula, used in only the A2 versions of the Abrams and beyond. Also, seeing how we (as in the U.S.) are one of the few nations with nuclear power plants, I'm guessing we had tons upon tons of leftover depleted uranium and found an actual use for it (I'm guessing). The addition made the frontal protection unmatched supposedly. Unfortunately, I've seen pictures of a single fatal RPG hit on the side of an Abrams, which was designed to take shots head-on. The DU also led to a very heavy combat weight of at least 80 tons, which probably wasn't the ideal match with the Abrams' gas turbine engine.

I heard that the use of a gas turbine means that it burns the same amount of gas whether it's idling or hauling ass at 45 mph.

I'm hardly an expert, but I've taken multiple classes and written multiple papers on psychopathy, and it pisses me off to no end when people use the term wrong. It's the media's fault mostly. No, CSI, just because you have a serial killer on your hands doesn't mean he's psychopathic. No, Dead Rising, those crazy, violent survivors ARE NOT PSYCHOPATHS. Even Dexter isn't actually a psychopath. Seven Psychopaths... you get a pass. Still Hollywood-ized, but at least they actually hit on the fact that psychopathy is a personality disorder, not just a synonym for crazy.

Ftaghn To You Too:
Armor is not ultra heavy and impossible to maneuver in (in fact you can mount a horse, cartwheel, and even swim in the stuff), swords are not extremely heavy and unwieldy, the Katana is an okay sword and not an amazing godlike one, the West has a huge documented martial arts tradition that may actually have more written records than the Eastern ones, English longbows cannot pierce plate armor, mail was more expensive than plate armor in later years, Voltaire's opinions on the Holy Roman Empire can go to hell, Vikings were not barbarians, the Muslim world was for most of history better than the Christian one, there is no such thing as "studded leather", what most people call "bastard swords" are actually called long swords and what people call long swords are actually arming swords, life wasn't as bad as people think it was, and on and on and on.

I'm not a medieval history buff, but I will pick up on that one, because I have a few of Fechtbuecher. It's silly how people in general, when you do point out that the German and Italian schools of swordsmanship were just as diverse and martial as their Chinese/Japanese counterparts (if not more so because of the great deal of weapons whose martial forms were codified), they turn a blind eye unashamedly because 'it looks boring'. Moreover, the level of spiritual philosophy (i.e. channelling strength/energy etc.), which again is as much as eastern sword-arts, in them just goes straight over their heads. The rage... :/

On a lighter note, as someone who understands German, dear god in heaven it's impossible to understand the rustic language a lot of the Fechtbuecher were written in!

FizzyIzze:
From what I understand, It was America that added the depleted uranium layer to the Chobham formula, used in only the A2 versions of the Abrams and beyond. Also, seeing how we (as in the U.S.) are one of the few nations with nuclear power plants, I'm guessing we had tons upon tons of leftover depleted uranium and found an actual use for it (I'm guessing). The addition made the frontal protection unmatched supposedly. Unfortunately, I've seen pictures of a single fatal RPG hit on the side of an Abrams, which was designed to take shots head-on. The DU also led to a very heavy combat weight of at least 80 tons, which probably wasn't the ideal match with the Abrams' gas turbine engine.

I heard that the use of a gas turbine means that it burns the same amount of gas whether it's idling or hauling ass at 45 mph.

Blimey... we must find a physicist to explain this! Just guessing, but I think the density of the uranium layer within the ceramic tiles, probably just in front of the matrix layer makes it a helluva lot tougher in terms of taking the impact out of kinetic projectiles... not sure how it'd work against shaped projectiles, but eh... strange that... -_-

Strength training.

I'm not really a professional, but I know quite a bit more about it than most, mainly by reading tons of books written by people who really know their shit.

Misconceptions:

"Strength training makes women big and bulky"
- Not possible for 99,99% of women without using steroids. Women lack the testosterone required to build big chunky muscles

"Strength training is not an important part of general physical fitness"
-This one seriously baffles me. A lot of people nowadays seem to think that physical fitness just means being able to jog for miles and miles. Bullshit. A wholly, completely fit human being is strong, fast, agile and has endurance, not just a frail little skeleton who's only ability is lumbering along at a slow speed for mile after mile. People seem to forget that we consist of more than just a brain and some organs; we have a musculo-skeletal system, and you need to keep that strong if you want to truly be physically fit. I can tell you from my own experience that a human being is quite simply happier strong than weak.

"Strength is not important for athletes"
-This one REALLY, REALLY baffles me. If strength is not important, why did baseball players suddenly start smashing home run records once they started roiding? To be fair, the majority of the people who claim that strength is not important for sports are recreational endurance athletes, like what most cyclists are. Obviously, strength is not a top priority for an endurance athletes, but to say that they don't benefit from it at all is complete horseshit. I'll paraphrase ol' Rips cyclist example. Each time a cyclist presses down on the pedal, they are using a portion of the maximum force that their leg (and posterior chain and so on) can produce. If the maximum force that their leg can produce goes up, that means that they use a smaller portion of that force to push down on the pedal. In other words, they become more effective at carrying their body across a distance. Strength is important to all sports, the only thing that varies is the cutoff point. Obviously, a cyclist is not going to need as much strength as, lets say, a wrestler.

"Strength training is dangerous and I'll get hurt"
-No. No it isn't. It is in fact significantly safer than, for example, running. In fact, strength specifically protects you from injury (stronger people are harder to kill etc.). Yeah, if you squat completely wrong, it could very well hurt you. That's the lesson: squat right. It will save you all kinds of trouble.

This last one isn't really a misconception as such, but it still kind of irritates me.

"I don't care about being able to squat 600 pounds"
- No one is saying that you need to squat 600 pounds, just that it would be be beneficial for you to be strong on a general level. People often equate strength with powerlifting or olympic weightlifting but those two sports are an extreme specialization in strength (or explosive strength in the case of OL, to be exact). I never try to convince anyone to do that, I just tell them that if you get stronger on a reasonable level, it will be beneficial.

SckizoBoy:

Blimey... we must find a physicist to explain this! Just guessing, but I think the density of the uranium layer within the ceramic tiles, probably just in front of the matrix layer makes it a helluva lot tougher in terms of taking the impact out of kinetic projectiles... not sure how it'd work against shaped projectiles, but eh... strange that... -_-

I might be imagining this, but I do recall seeing a video of a two-stage Russian RPG test on an Abrams A2 with no effect (on the frontal armor that is).

rium125:
As a tabletop gamer, I'm often annoyed by people confusing my hobby with LARP, and confusing LARP with what they saw in the film 'Role Models' it's somewhat frustrating to keep having to explain that no, I don't spend my weekends running round the park in a cape waving a stick like an excitable 8-year old.

yeah, it does get annoying when someone hears that i played D&D or any other rpg, and think im a satan worshiper or i have no friends, or that i secretly believe i honestly am the character(s) i play as in those games.

now, this is far from an area of expertise (i honestly never bothered to memorize all of the rules, or even all of the core game mechanics, because my dm is horrible with the crunch, and so many things simply never came up), but it is still irksome.

Because I'm a musician and in a rock band, people call me a rock star. Ignoring the fact that I absolutely loathe that phrase (I'm a punk guy, what can I say?), it also makes no sense to call me that. Do I have millions of fans? No. Do I have millions of dollars? No. Do people generally know who the fuck I am? Hahaha no. My other beef is when people say that having a guitar gets you girls. Yeah, if you're playing Jason Mraz. Not so much if you play Stooges and Mudhoney.

I suppose my area of expertise would be writing and debate. And I have to say, I'm often faced with people that assume that because I write well, in casual chat I'm always going to type with proper capitalization and punctuation. It's really not the case; unlike most, I've learned my language of choice well enough that I've earned the right to abuse it.

JoJo:
entertainment

I thought that required blood sacrifice?

Just to clarify, I say this in good humour.

OT: I am a programmer. For whatever reason, people think that you can program something that can do all of their work with a press of a button, and complain about the documentation being too damn difficult. I ask you: If one could program software that would replace you, would you be here?

klown:
They think they can give me an email address and I should be able to hack the password in no time flat and give them full access to it.

Yes you can: http://www.whatsmypass.com/the-top-500-worst-passwords-of-all-time

"There are no mistakes in art".

Sure...if you don't know what you are fucking TRYING TO ACHIEVE.

Moose:

disgruntledgamer:

Moose:
Graduated with a degree in Archaeology a few years back. The amount of people who had asked me if I had dug up any dinosaurs....

Are you serious? People confuse ancient human civilizations with paleontology.

Yeah it happens. I just tell them I don't dig deep enough to find dinosaurs. Saves me trying to explain that the study of dinosaurs is a different thing entirely.

I'd just start making up fake dinosaur names like Barack-a-sore-ass and tell them it's a new discovery that's at the closest museum and they should call and make inquires about it.

Greek, Roman, Norse, Egyptian mythology -
I'm not an all-encompassing master of these mythologies, but I am VERY well-versed compared to the average person, especially Greek myths.
People just....they don't know shit about mythology.
Everything they think they know comes from some twisted completely messed-up pop culture reinterpretation that has very little relation at all to actual mythology.
For example:
- Hades/Pluto, Dis Pater, Anubis, Thantos, etc etc, being evil.
- Kratos being a god of note.
- The Kraken being a Greek monster that Perseus fought.
- The list goes on and on....

Ninjas -
I'm not an all-encompassing master of knowledge about ninjas either, but I AM a lowly trained ninja, and have been taught a decent amount of actual Ninjutsu history as part of that. Just as with the various mythologies, most people don't know diddly crap about ninjas.
- The number of times I run into people who think ninjas are entirely fictional is...sad. I can understand the idea that ninjas might no longer be around, since, while we're not secretive, we don't really do anything to make the public aware of our continued existence, and we certainly operate in a completely different capacity from the dedicated spies and assassins we once were....but to think that ninjas are as mythical as goblins and dragons...that's just weird to me.

Video Games -
Most of us here are gamers, and that makes video games and "expertise" of ours compared to the non-gaming public.
Beyond the run-of-the-mill gamer, I've also spent years learning from game analysts and critics, and becoming very VERY familiar with the inner workings of the game industry, the way it "thinks", what patterns it follows, trends it gravitates towards, etc etc, and I've recently started going to school for Game Design.
- I'm sure I don't have to tell you guys all the horrible stupid crap the non-gaming public believes about video games. The list of stupid, mind-numbing idiocy we hear about video games from Fox News ALONE....it's painful.
- A lot of ordinary hard-core gamers have really poorly thought out criticisms of various games/franchises.
Not understanding things like certain strengths of a given game being the result of perceived weakness of the game.
Not understanding that time and hardware limitations mean that a game like:
Metal Gear Solid 4 can have almost flawless graphics and super-realistic animation because it's VERY linear and has relatively simple gameplay.
Assassin's Creed can have super-realistic animations and beautiful graphics AND a massive open world at the price of being glitchy as all hell and having a narrow range of gameplay/story options
Fallout and The Elder Scrolls can have pretty graphics, huge open worlds, and a bazillion options and variables, but at the cost of having horrible animation, glitches, and very generic gameplay (it's just a really straight-forward first person RPG control set up).

Ultramarines in Warhammer 40,000 -
People only have a very very shallow comprehension of them based off of simplified descriptions aimed at new players. Or they have a comprehension of them based on the "Ultramarines Series" of books, which are written by an author who appears to be utterly incapable of writing about actual Ultramarines.
The long time Ultramarines players, who've read about the Chapter until they've most all available sources, end up with the understanding that:
- The Ultramarines are about as FAR from a bland "vanilla" Chapter as they could possibly be. They may perfectly fulfill the "bare minimum" requirements of the "standard" Chapter, but they don't JUST fulfill that bare minimum. They do everything as grandly and efficiently as possible. They take all those same parameters and fulfill them all to the max, and THEN add that on top of their vast and elaborate Greco-Roman cultural themes.
- Graham McNeill can't write Ultramarines fluff what meshes with the canon to save his life.
- etc
- etc
- etc
- etc
- I could go on forever
- Eventually you realize that even Games-Workshop is slowly losing grip on the details of the Ultramarines.

I'm sure I can add a bunch more things to this list if I really sat and though about it.
This is just what occurs to me while sitting here in my Game Development class.

I'm a musician who's band recently signed a record contract with an indie label. People who find out (who aren't in the music world much) absolutely freak. Alright, I appreciate the enthusiasm! It IS a cool thing, it's a great step in the right direction! Not all labels are fucking, I don't know, Virgin Records or EMI however. We're not set for life. It might be a while if ever I get a dime off these folks. No the mansion and the BMW are not in the mail.

Also on the same page, getting my hair cut the other day, chatting it up with the scissor brandishing lady telling her about some of the stuff going on, and she informs me that the secret to bands making it? Getting on the radio. It's so simple! Just get your music on the national radio stations! OH THANKS LADY. WHY DID WE NOT THINK OF THAT. Genius.

BiscuitTrouser:

Or my favourite the blobbogram:

image

The X axis should read "Results of test" or words to that effect and have a middle line for the control to show how the tests deviate from the norm either negatively or positively. This what real science looks like people. On the blobbogram the middle is the placebo. The middle of the horizontal lines represents what that test showed (worse or better) and the length of the line indicates how far the real result could deviate based on the limitations of the test.

Unless data is correlated like this and involves EVERY test you can find that fits on that axis your conclusion will be flawed. People who take a single test (Im looking at YOU news article "X CAUSES CANCER") to try and show "Science" supports anything annoy me. Thats really shitty science.

And the fact that Cochrane's Symbol is that of a real systematic review and meta analysis that showed giving corticosteroids to mothers of premature infants would save lives. Hurray for (factually correct) Science!

lithiumvocals:
Because I'm a musician and in a rock band, people call me a rock star. Ignoring the fact that I absolutely loathe that phrase (I'm a punk guy, what can I say?), it also makes no sense to call me that. Do I have millions of fans? No. Do I have millions of dollars? No. Do people generally know who the fuck I am? Hahaha no. My other beef is when people say that having a guitar gets you girls. Yeah, if you're playing Jason Mraz. Not so much if you play Stooges and Mudhoney.

Yeah, I wanna vouch for all of this too. I mean, the "rock star" thing, I understand it's coming from a place of flattery. Totally. But yeah, I'm not rich and I'm not famous and I really don't wanna associate myself with that whole shtick. "Rock star", ew. In my myriad of musical ventures I've experienced enough "aspiring rock stars" to last a life time. Getting young teen girls trashed so they can lure them out to their van and have their very own groupie, treating music like a competition, treating the different scenes of the country as tools to be used instead of various interesting people to interact with get to know and enjoy a mutual love of music... no thanks. You can keep that term.

Thedutchjelle:
I study Biomedical Sciences, so the oft-heard misconceptions about human health, biology or science in general piss me off to no end:
-You only use 10% of your brain!
-Eating sugar makes you hyperactive!
-All the vaccination conspiracy loons

you get energy from plants because of photosynthasis!...

or so I heard

SckizoBoy:

FizzyIzze:
Tanks....YUM. Chobham armor FTW. Chobham with a layer of depleted uranium...drool.

Slightly off topic... but do you know the construction of Chobham armour? (Spelt with a 'u'... it's British after all!)

And why would you want depleted uranium in vehicle armour, out of curiosity? o_O'

Mostly because depleted uranium is dense as fuck, making it very effective armour.

OT: When people break their computers and have no idea what to do, yet look at me like i am an idiot when i tell them. Case in point, anyone who ever got a virus from a torrent ever!

TopazFusion:
I've worked in photographic enhancement, and the number of times I've been presented with a shitty little thumbnail and requested to somehow turn it into a high quality, poster-sized image is beyond belief.

I'm sorry, this ain't CSI.

I am asked this on a daily basis. Or they have a picture with a sign that's blurry, and ask me to simply "unblur" it. Another time I was asked to remove a group of people from in front of a sign. When I did (I edited the spot they were in with the background of the sign, so it looked like it was missing lettering. And edited the rest of the sign blank.) And they came back asking why the sign is blank. They didn't seem to understand that a picture taken from a camera is flat, and thought if I just erased the people the sign would be 100% intact. Until I explained it with a piece of paper.

Twice every year, I'll be asked to blow up a wallet-sized photo and turn it into an 8x10 photo with no quality loss. Their defense is simply "The photographer can do it, why can't you?". And my step-dad (who owns this business) doesn't understand why I don't want to take over when he retires.

thejackyl:
I am asked this on a daily basis. Or they have a picture with a sign that's blurry, and ask me to simply "unblur" it. Another time I was asked to remove a group of people from in front of a sign. When I did (I edited the spot they were in with the background of the sign, so it looked like it was missing lettering. And edited the rest of the sign blank.) And they came back asking why the sign is blank. They didn't seem to understand that a picture taken from a camera is flat, and thought if I just erased the people the sign would be 100% intact. Until I explained it with a piece of paper.
.

I can't wrap my head around the Idea like in that case people think cameras are some kind of arcane magic...you can't make things in the photo apear out of nowhere, until we get cameras that take photos that are fully formed 3D environemnts...that would be trippy

EDIT: if I recall correctly girl with the dragon tatoo was actually a little more acurate in that regard

I guess "retail clerk" isn't much of an area of expertise, but:

- Customers assume that every clerk in the store is 100% knowledgeable about EVERYTHING in the store, even if it's a big department store with 10,000+ different products. And not just that, but they know the behind-the-scenes processes of the store and how it works, how it's managed, everything... No, just, no...

- Customers also seem to assume that retail associates have no lives and no biological needs or functions. I had one lady tell me I was "disgraceful" because I wanted to go on break during a busy hour; I was overdue for my break by over an hour, and was starting to feel dizzy from being hungry and doing so much talking, not to mention dealing with said lady who was going nuts because she lost her receipt yet expected a full return on an item. So here I am, feeling like I'm about to throw up and pass out, and have some lady telling me I'm a disgrace for wanting to leave the til when lines are long. Sheesh lady, I'm just a retail clerk wanting to go on a short break, I'm not a doctor abandoning his patients or something.

I have to...not disagree with you but kinda agree with the people you are disagreeing with.

Kpt._Rob:
As an artist I deal with tons of misconceptions about art. The big one that bothers me is when people say something like "I was just never talented enough to be an artist." No one was ever born with innate artistic talent. Becoming an artist means learning all the techniques for rendering an image, developing thematic and philosophical content, practicing a lot, and having the patience to work on a painting for the ridiculous amount of time that it takes to make a good painting. It's not talent, it's hard work, and it's frustrating to hear that get dismissed.

Yes art is a skill that can be learned, but to be any good at it, being naturally talented would certainly help, especially with the whole learning the skills. (i dont mean like gifted, i mean "having the knack", i personally cant even draw decent stick figures)

Kpt._Rob:
And while I don't work in pure abstraction myself, I do find it offensive when people outright dismiss artists like Pollock or Rothko because they don't understand enough about the art world to know how to look at them in the first place. Yes, there are some talentless hacks who have used abstraction to get away with being lazy, but that's no reason to dismiss an entire genre inhabited by some truly driven artists.

I understand the passion you must have to actually be offended by people not liking art, but some people just dont like it. I for one cannot begin to understand what any of pollock's work is supposed to mean, or make me feel, or even what it is. Art appreciation is a personal thing, and some people just dont get it. I like my art to be of something that i can relate to, not an abstract idea or feeling, and it is possibly to do with the way i look at it but so be it.

Basically what i am saying is that art is not for everyone, in the same way that not everyone appreciates all types of music, or books, or food or anything. Its not something to get offended over, its not even really their fault.

I got bachelors in economics. people seem to think that economics only revolves around rich people stealing from the poor. i am dissapoint in humanity.
Im getting my masters in accounting. No, we are not bookworms, we are the real control of the company. everything goes though us.
Currently working in national statistics department. you know, the misconception that most statistics are made up.... turns out to actually be true.....
In my free time i also fix computers (not muh free time now but i used to). whenever somoen comes with a totally dead pc and "well you just have to type some command and make it work" it really is annoying. the "i dont care what you do just make it work" is at least somewhat better.
Then again there are people who think:
fuel gets inejcted into a car.
magic happens
you drive.

- Customers assume that every clerk in the store is 100% knowledgeable about EVERYTHING in the store, even if it's a big department store with 10,000+ different products.

well thats kinda YOUR JOB to KNOW. i know i didnt get hired as retail clerk because they werent satisfied with my knowledge. so there definatelly is a need for certain knowledge, at least the basics. Actually this is the reason i almost never ask for help, usually i know more than the clerk :(

Case in point, anyone who ever got a virus from a torrent ever!

not to go offtopic but torrent is the safest way of downloading anything when you look at viruses. private torrents from companies are safe because well they are private, and public ones are weeded out by public almsot isntantly. the old pirating services like emule, dc++ and so on are where the viruses lurk. its a common misconception that torrents are full of viruses. they are not.

Vault101:

Thedutchjelle:
I study Biomedical Sciences, so the oft-heard misconceptions about human health, biology or science in general piss me off to no end:
-You only use 10% of your brain!
-Eating sugar makes you hyperactive!
-All the vaccination conspiracy loons

you get energy from plants because of photosynthasis!...

or so I heard

Strangle that person, while screaming "YOU CAN MAKE YOUR OXYGEN WITH PHOTOSYNTHESIS CAN YOU NOT?" for extra effect.

People who:
1) Think history deals in "facts" and how the past "really happened." Leopold von Ranke has been dead for almost 130 years. History moved on.
2) Think historians know every inane detail of everything that ever happened. We don't. In fact, if you meet someone who bores you to death with tedious little historical details, and gets angry when people are being "historically incorrect" (how DARE you depict the soldiers in that WW2 movie with 50s era machine guns!!!!111), then you probably met a historian who wasn't academically trained.
3) Think that we need to "know the past" in order to prevent "past mistakes" from "happening again." That one really gets my goat, since it is utter bullshit.
4) Who think that history is a horribly imprecise discipline. No. In fact, I would dare to argue that it is epistemologically more sophisticated than quite a number of other disciplines in the Humanities/Social "Sciences."

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