I can't watch" black comedies "anymore. (Edit: Ethnicity, not humor)

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TL;DR I can't watch black comedies anymore. Those comedies that use a lot of negative black stereotypes unironically to get a few laughs. I feel they encourage prejudice, and hinder the fight against racism.

OT: This was a half though that came into mind, while looking through my netflix movie list, so forgive me if this sounds like i'm rambling. I realised, that i can't watch black comedies anymore, not because the actors are black, but because of the content in said movies and what i feel like they are promoting. Now first off ,i'm a 25 year old black canadian male. As a child/teenager i loved these movies, i found them to be quite funny. You could usually spot one of these movies/shows from a mile away. They usually have a main cast of only black people, sometimes they would throw one or two white or asian character for diversity. As i grew older, and started to resent these types of movies. They are written in a way that, in my opinion, promotes prejudice and worst racism. The actors do and say things that reflects black stereotypes. Be it the way they act or talk , they use racial stereotypes unironically. Which, wouldn't be too bad if people didn't actually believe most , if not all black people behaved this way. I say unironically, because usually the movies are very serious, when they portray black people this way. Usually when they want to be ironic, they just have the main character be white ( sometimes asian) and act stereotypically black, which while funny at first, made me realise that people actually believe black people act this way, and when a white person does it, they are "acting" black.

Bassically this films/shows devolve into , forgive my language, nigga jokes. Very few of the films i have seen, actually make a social comentary about these stereotypes. They basically just say :" this is how black people act, and it is funny". Which is what really grinds my gears. The only exception i can find to this rule is the cartoon " The boondocks". I would suspect if anyone actually watched this they would understand. I'm sure there are more but i haven't seen them.

I just can't believe the number of times people would pick a stereotype that they saw on tv or at the movies and would ask me how come i don't act/talk/dress like that because they thought all black people do. This is made worst by the people who actually do embrace and behave like said stereotypes ( like talking in slang, listing to rap music at max volume, wearing baggy clothes and caps,etc...), but that's another topic. Basically, they are bombarded with black stereotypes and start to believe them.

Anyways my question is:

Do you like black comedies?
Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
Am i overreacting ?
What do you think?

Edit:

Edited title, i swear you guys are too smart for your own good.

Could you name some of these comedies?

Do you like black comedies? Not particularly. I liked Big Mama and Death at a Funeral though.
Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes? They most certainly can, yes.
Am i overreacting? No, it's your opinion and you're entitled to it.
What do you think? I think you're going to attract a lot of controversy as to the exact definition of "black comedy" but I'm taking it as "movies with an all-black cast".

Love The Boondocks by the way. Tough that Aaron McGruder went on to work on Red Tails though, what a bad movie.

Queen Michael:
Could you name some of these comedies?

Everything Tyler Perry makes?

Queen Michael:
Could you name some of these comedies?

I'm talking about comedies with:

Eddy murphy
Chris Rock
Kevin hart
Ice cube
Tyler perry

Movies like:

Big mama's house
Madea's big happy family
Love and basketball
Diary of a mad black woman
Death at a funeral
Barbershop
Are we there yet?
Good hair
The nutter professor
Think like a man
The ride along
Soul plane
First sunday
Friday
Boyz n the hood
Lottery ticket
Baby boy
Half baked
Mac and devin go to high school
How high

And anything Tyler perry makes. Seriously i think Tyler perry took black people back 20 years with his shotty movies.

Wait, THAT's what black comedy means? I thought black comedy was comedy that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter.

Being a white person, I don't feel like I really have a right to say anything about these movies. I also feel like these movies aren't for me to begin with, which reinforces the other thought. All that aside though, I can't help but feel like the ones I have seen pander to the lowest common denominator.

Zontar:
Wait, THAT's what black comedy means? I thought black comedy was comedy that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter.

Apparently Wikipedia feels the same way. And the dictionary, and TvTropes, and Urban Dictionary... but OP clearly meant it in a different way.

I don't like "black comedies" because most of them are just bad movies in general.
I honestly can't name even one that I would consider a good movie, not from the top of my head anyway.

When How High came out, people were creaming themselves over it, quoting lines etc.
I watched it and hated it, especially the "characters". The dean who was the bad guy was the only person I could relate to.
Did I chuckle a few times? Sure, but I chuckled at Transformers 2 here and there, I even let out a "heh" once or twice during Meet the Spartans and that was the worst thing I've seen in my life. If you keep throwing shit at a wall, eventually some of it is going to stick.

To me, it almost seems as if only 2-3 people are writing all these comedies. Either that or they just rip each other off.
The humor, although the movies are mostly R rated, is very childish ("haha, big fat bitch is having sex with a skinny short guy" or "haha, Asians have small dicks"), like a 12-year old wrote it.

What pisses me off is that there aren't really any "real" black movies. I've never seen a good cop action drama or a sci-fi movie written and performed mostly by black people. All I see are dumb comedies. Sometimes better, sometimes worse, but always dumb comedies (well, there were "12 Years a Slave" and "Fruitvale Station" recently so I guess that's a step up). Maybe it's because they always turn a profit (seriously, there's a big market for these types of movies and the filmmakers exploit that to no end).

Wow, that is quite the list.

Do you like black comedies?
Not to the extent where I get excited when I a new one is announced. I haven't seen a lot of them. I've avoided the Tyler Perry movies because of their reputation. I also don't find movies about Stoners or the "Teen Movie" that funny.

I've enjoyed some of the older black comedies. I'm Gonna Git You Sucka (1988) is a good time. The Boondocks is very well done. Barbershop was kinda weird.

Some other movies that I dunno if they count as Black Comedy for reasons I can't articulate. Does "Blazing Saddles" count? It has social commentary on race, the main character is black and is part of a black community. Most older Eddie Murphy movies are classics. I also I liked the first two Rush Hour movies. It was a while ago but I think Head of State is still funny. If anything it should have improved. Who knows?

Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
Yeah, most of them probably do.

Am i overreacting?
Naw, if a comedy bothers you and you can't laugh at the jokes then it makes sense to turn it off.

What do you think?

What do you mean by this?

Is it how I try to reconcile my morals with the ugly side of some of the media I enjoy. Y'know, the times where I'll laugh at a movie, but find my enjoyment crippled in retrospect.

OR

What I think about giving up on a genre?

OR

Was that referring to the three questions above it?

HardkorSB:
I don't like "black comedies" because most of them are just bad movies in general.
I honestly can't name even one that I would consider a good movie, not from the top of my head anyway.

What pisses me off is that there aren't really any "real" black movies. I've never seen a good cop action drama or a sci-fi movie written and performed mostly by black people. All I see are dumb comedies. Sometimes better, sometimes worse, but always dumb comedies (well, there were "12 Years a Slave" and "Fruitvale Station" recently so I guess that's a step up). Maybe it's because they always turn a profit (seriously, there's a big market for these types of movies and the filmmakers exploit that to no end).

For the Sci-Fi thing: You have to think about the audiences who would watch a movie with a black cast, though. How many people lost their shit over the Human Torch being black, being played by Michael B. Jordan (Who was great in Chronicle, in my opinion), when they probably wanted another white guy? This will be a mold breaker, and then maybe black Sci-Fi might be more prevalent, but for right now, it's still as taboo as anybody attempting to make a Gay Cowboy movie.

As for the 12YAS/Fruitvale Station: Black entertainment exists in either Drama or Comedy, those two are just especially important drama films, one of which might end up winning an academy award, but they aren't revolutionary. Amistad, Beloved, Glory and The Color Purple before it are just really moving films, though I recognize that Black director Steve McQueen at the director's chair of 12YAS makes it bigger, and going for modern films with black rights issues, the oeuvres of Spike Lee (Early Spike Lee) and John Singleton make up a lot of that as well.

Not to shit on you, just saying that with the exception of 12 Years a Slave's milestone director, those types of film have been made before, albeit with white directors. In all honesty, I really want to see 12 Years myself.

Johnny Novgorod:

Apparently Wikipedia feels the same way. And the dictionary, and TvTropes, and Urban Dictionary... but OP clearly meant it in a different way.

Zontar:
Wait, THAT's what black comedy means? I thought black comedy was comedy that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter.

Wikipedia:

A black comedy (dark comedy) is a comic work that employs black humor, which, in its most basic definition, is humor that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor.

The term black humor (from the French humour noir) was coined by the surrealist theoretician André Breton in 1935,to designate a sub-genre of comedy and satire in which laughter arises from cynicism and skepticism, often relying on topics such as death.

Breton coined the term for his book Anthology of Black Humor (Anthologie de l'humour noir), in which he credited Jonathan Swift as the originator of black humor and gallows humor, and included excerpts from 45 other writers. Breton included both examples in which the wit arises from a victim, with which the audience empathizes, as is more typical in the tradition of gallows humor, and examples in which the comedy is used to mock the victim, whose suffering is trivialized, and leads to sympathizing with the victimizer, as is the case with Sade. Black humor is related to that of the grotesque genre.

These gentlemen are correct, that is nowhere close to the actual understood definition of black comedy. I think the word you are implying in your phrasing is Black People Comedy. I'm not sure if this particular omission was due to an oversight or an intentional attempt to avoid offense.

If I had to purely speculate then I might guess that you aren't well-oriented when it comes to African American culture. Some of these movies, Tyler Perry's particularly, come from a heritage based around these types of experiences and phenomena involving black and typically southern cultures. What some people might deem stereotypes are typically based on trends codified due to circumstance, such as the origin of soul food which was a result of the disadvantage that came with slavery and those recently liberated being forced to deal with a difficult time.

Much of these films reflect these phenomena in a positive and humorous light, reminding people of culture that may be becoming lost to today's trends and ideas.

Just some thoughts.

krazykidd:
Anyways my question is:

Do you like black comedies?
Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
Am i overreacting ?
What do you think?

I'm not a big fan of black comedies, but to be honest, I don't much care for white comedies either. Comedy as a whole isn't very funny, to use genitalia as a punch-line doesn't work for me, and everything is too culturally relevant, so I end up cringing at how dated most of those jokes will be, so I really don't enjoy them as much as I could.

Do I think they enforce negative stereotypes?
I think it depends on the movie. With the exception of one joke, I didn't find Death at a Funeral very negative, really. If you made the cast white, it wouldn't be all that different (I still wouldn't find it very funny). Movies like the Friday films I think do, but nobody in those films are anything but cartoon characters (I remember the Hispanic characters in the sequel being nothing more than "What you saying to me now, Holmes?" types, and it was bad then).

Am I overreacting? What do you think?
I don't think so. I don't know what else to add.

As for your list of movies, I can provide counters to most of those actors that I liked:
Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence (One black actor I do not enjoy at all) did Life, and that movie made the color of their skin integral to the plot. It's actually a very funny, very good movie.
Chris Rock did a movie a few years back called I Think I love My Wife which was very good. It's very low key and sort of goes off rails near the end, but it's a well made comedy/drama.

krazykidd:

Movies like:

Love and basketball
Good hair
Boyz n the hood
Baby boy

I must say out right that with the exception of Boyz n The Hood, I haven't seen any of these, but aren't most of these dramas, excluding Good Hair, which is a documentary by Chris Rock?

As for most of those films, they are all bad comedies, but Are We There Yet?, even if you made that with a white cast, it would still suck, and that's a family movie, you kind of have to write those off as inherently bad in most cases.

I don't disagree with you at all on anything you said. The Boondocks is the one example that makes me laugh, but that's because Aaron Macgruder is a satirist, and a damn good one. It makes me wish he would write movies, just to be the counter of all the negative jokes you do not like so much.

krazykidd:

Queen Michael:
Could you name some of these comedies?

I'm talking about comedies with:

Eddy murphy
Chris Rock
Kevin hart
Ice cube
Tyler perry

Movies like:

Big mama's house
Madea's big happy family
Love and basketball
Diary of a mad black woman
Death at a funeral
Barbershop
Are we there yet?
Good hair
The nutter professor
Think like a man
The ride along
Soul plane
First sunday
Friday
Boyz n the hood
Lottery ticket
Baby boy
Half baked
Mac and devin go to high school
How high

And anything Tyler perry makes. Seriously i think Tyler perry took black people back 20 years with his shotty movies.

We don't get a lot of those here in Sweden. Most people here have never heard of Tyler Perry.

krazykidd:

Queen Michael:
Could you name some of these comedies?

I'm talking about comedies with:

Eddy murphy

If that means you can no longer watch Beverly Hills Cop 1 & 2, then you have my sympathy.

Johnny Novgorod:
Do you like black comedies? Not particularly. I liked Big Mama and Death at a Funeral though.

Watch the original Death At a Funeral. It's a MUCH better film. (Directed by Frank Oz!)

BQE:

Johnny Novgorod:

Apparently Wikipedia feels the same way. And the dictionary, and TvTropes, and Urban Dictionary... but OP clearly meant it in a different way.

Zontar:
Wait, THAT's what black comedy means? I thought black comedy was comedy that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter.

Wikipedia:

A black comedy (dark comedy) is a comic work that employs black humor, which, in its most basic definition, is humor that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor.

The term black humor (from the French humour noir) was coined by the surrealist theoretician André Breton in 1935,to designate a sub-genre of comedy and satire in which laughter arises from cynicism and skepticism, often relying on topics such as death.

Breton coined the term for his book Anthology of Black Humor (Anthologie de l'humour noir), in which he credited Jonathan Swift as the originator of black humor and gallows humor, and included excerpts from 45 other writers. Breton included both examples in which the wit arises from a victim, with which the audience empathizes, as is more typical in the tradition of gallows humor, and examples in which the comedy is used to mock the victim, whose suffering is trivialized, and leads to sympathizing with the victimizer, as is the case with Sade. Black humor is related to that of the grotesque genre.

These gentlemen are correct, that is nowhere close to the actual understood definition of black comedy. I think the word you are implying in your phrasing is Black People Comedy. I'm not sure if this particular omission was due to an oversight or an intentional attempt to avoid offense.

You see, that's where I prefer calling certain movies "dark comedies" instead of "black comedies" because of how the term "black comedy" seems to lean more towards what the OP uses when describing movies with a mostly-to-all-black cast... If a movie has a dark sense of humor, then it's a "dark comedy"... It makes more sense to call it that than a "black comedy" at this point...

OT: Well, as a black man, I always never liked Tyler Perry movies even when he's not even in it... I even prefer Kevin Hart to his stand-up the same way I prefer Ice Cube to his music and nothing else...

With that said, I rarely prefer your understanding of "black comedies" outside of The Boondocks, Do The Right Thing, Boyz n the Hood, Half Baked (mostly due to Dave Chappelle), Don't Be A Menace, and most of Eddie Murphy's early movies before The Nutty Professor remake... My mom still enjoys certain "black comedies" like The Best Man Holiday and a few Tyler Perry movies he ONLY produced, not directed and/or makes an appearance in... Other than that, I just do NOT care for them in the slightest and would much rather watch multiple Workaholics/Boondocks episodes than those kind of movies...

[initial reaction]
If you can't enjoy "Blackadder goes Forth" than you should feel sorry for yourself, sir!

[after reading OP]
OOOOOOH, so that is what you meant.
Really? Is this what people mean by "black comedy" now?
I mostly call them "crappy comedies", "waste of time and energy", "no, not again!" or simply "WHY?"
But I guess terminology differs on the other side of Atlantic pond.

Eh. It's just another way that Hollywood has failed to appeal to me for years. I rarely go to the movies, and I never watch any comedy anymore.

I don't think it's insidious. Racist, yeah probably, but malicious? Meh. I've never been one to viciously condemn people for not thinking something through, especially if everyone else does it.

krazykidd:
This is made worst by the people who actually do embrace and behave like said stereotypes ( like talking in slang, listing to rap music at max volume, wearing baggy clothes and caps,etc...), but that's another topic.

I think that's the real issue here, as it becomes a chicken or the egg scenario. You argue that these movies promote the belief in these stereotypes, but isn't it just as likely these movies are feeding off those who like and adopt the stereotypes.

The majority of people recognize that movies are in general a fantasy, and there are bigger things to worry about from those that do than believing a comedic stereotype.

What's more likely to feed into these perceptions by the masses, is like you said seeing real life examples that have a greater potential for reinforcing negative stereotypes.

shogunblade:

krazykidd:
Anyways my question is:

Do you like black comedies?
Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
Am i overreacting ?
What do you think?

I'm not a big fan of black comedies, but to be honest, I don't much care for white comedies either. Comedy as a whole isn't very funny, to use genitalia as a punch-line doesn't work for me, and everything is too culturally relevant, so I end up cringing at how dated most of those jokes will be, so I really don't enjoy them as much as I could.

Do I think they enforce negative stereotypes?
I think it depends on the movie. With the exception of one joke, I didn't find Death at a Funeral very negative, really. If you made the cast white, it wouldn't be all that different (I still wouldn't find it very funny). Movies like the Friday films I think do, but nobody in those films are anything but cartoon characters (I remember the Hispanic characters in the sequel being nothing more than "What you saying to me now, Holmes?" types, and it was bad then).

the cast of Death at a Funeral IS white, or was... it is a british comedy film written and directed by Frank Oz (yes THAT one) which was remade by him for american audiences. almost word for word and scene for scene, with a few black jokes thrown in the mix, as well as the climax of the movie being funnier. so if they sound like actual people in the film, it is because they were meant to sound like actual people. the original is a great film, i highly recommend you give it a watch if you liked the remake.

Do you like black comedies?
no. i dont like "black" comedies for the same reasons you do not.
its always filled with black stereotypes like the old black man that talks in a blues/souls/gospel preach Rhythm. and its marketet as funny but its just annoying.

Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
if the movies that revolve around how black someone is and how cracker white someone else is could enforce negative stereopypes? take a wild guess.

Am i overreacting ?
maybe.

What do you think?
its just not my cup of tea. and i am sure someone out there enjoys it.

krazykidd:
TL;DR I can't watch black comedies anymore. Those comedies that use a lot of negative black stereotypes unironically to get a few laughs. I feel they encourage prejudice, and hinder the fight against racism.

OT: This was a half though that came into mind, while looking through my netflix movie list, so forgive me if this sounds like i'm rambling. I realised, that i can't watch black comedies anymore, not because the actors are black, but because of the content in said movies and what i feel like they are promoting. Now first off ,i'm a 25 year old black canadian male. As a child/teenager i loved these movies, i found them to be quite funny. You could usually spot one of these movies/shows from a mile away. They usually have a main cast of only black people, sometimes they would throw one or two white or asian character for diversity. As i grew older, and started to resent these types of movies. They are written in a way that, in my opinion, promotes prejudice and worst racism. The actors do and say things that reflects black stereotypes. Be it the way they act or talk , they use racial stereotypes unironically. Which, wouldn't be too bad if people didn't actually believe most , if not all black people behaved this way. I say unironically, because usually the movies are very serious, when they portray black people this way. Usually when they want to be ironic, they just have the main character be white ( sometimes asian) and act stereotypically black, which while funny at first, made me realise that people actually believe black people act this way, and when a white person does it, they are "acting" black.

Bassically this films/shows devolve into , forgive my language, nigga jokes. Very few of the films i have seen, actually make a social comentary about these stereotypes. They basically just say :" this is how black people act, and it is funny". Which is what really grinds my gears. The only exception i can find to this rule is the cartoon " The boondocks". I would suspect if anyone actually watched this they would understand. I'm sure there are more but i haven't seen them.

I just can't believe the number of times people would pick a stereotype that they saw on tv or at the movies and would ask me how come i don't act/talk/dress like that because they thought all black people do. This is made worst by the people who actually do embrace and behave like said stereotypes ( like talking in slang, listing to rap music at max volume, wearing baggy clothes and caps,etc...), but that's another topic. Basically, they are bombarded with black stereotypes and start to believe them.

Anyways my question is:

Do you like black comedies?
Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?
Am i overreacting ?
What do you think?

Well, the thing is that stereotypes exist because they happen to be true, that's what sociology is all about, as this basic truth can be used to manipulate people for purposes like advertising and the like. Guys like Tyler Perry very much exploit these truths in creating their ongoing movie franchises which continue to make millions upon millions of dollars.

I frequently mention Bill Cosby in posts about race largely because when he talks about education (he has a PHD in Children's Education) he frequently touches on the subject of black culture and what it does to hurt black America by promoting unrealistic expectations and codes of behavior, and causing people to literally squander the opportunities given to them, education being seen as akin to "selling out". He explains it much better than I can, and as I've said with some frequency over the years you could read his stuff. I believe what your seeing here is an extension of this basic problem, when your a black person, become fairly well educated, and fit in better with mainstream society (which makes you something of a "sell out") and look at black culture from the outside you can sort of see the problems, the stereotypes, the trends, the attitudes, and how the problems are occurring. Of course getting someone to understand that is difficult, Bill Cosby for example has been attacked quite a bit for saying the things he's done, with "race traitor" being high among the list of insults.

For the most part the basic "attitude" of black culture is that it's okay to act that way, but it's also okay to attack anyone as a racist or a bigot for calling them on it, or saying, doing, or even talking about half the things that black culture promotes in of itself. Along with this comes certain attitudes of pro-black racism, entitlement, and of course a willingness to use any tool including screaming racism in the other direction towards pro-black ends. Anyone who happens to be black and becomes critical is either a race traitor, or someone who "sold out so long ago they can't understand what it is to be black anymore". This makes helping these people, halting the conflicts, and dealing with the problems very difficult.

On some levels Bill Cosby and Tyler Perry are polar opposites when it comes to successful, educated, black men, who work heavily with black culture through the entertainment industry. Bill Cosby has spent a good part of his life on educational causes, donating millions to education, founding programs, and even starting things like "Picture Pages" fairly early on to try and help poorer children with less opportunities educate themselves better (albeit the realities of that program and printing costs apparently made it so it wasn't viable for the target audience which is why it died). Basically Bill has been pushing to get black America to grow up and join the rest of society, and assimilate black culture into the mainstream, along with pushing for generally better children's education along the spectrum. It hasn't always made him popular with "his own people". Tyler Perry on the other hand is a really smart guy who pretty much sees a gold mine in black America, a nearly endless gravy train he can ride by encouraging and preying on the worst inclinations of black America. In his comedies he basically uses a style of humor that both mocks and validates this kind of culture and it's associated behaviors. What's more he makes so much money doing it, that he winds up getting a lot of well educated black actors and talents to literally debase themselves when they need the money, which means that a lot of people who otherwise probably would have been positive role models, wind up contributing to the problem when they become heavily associated with his work.

Now, I mostly talk about Tyler Perry because he's the big "name" here, but the same thing could have been said about the Wayans brothers and other people who have done similar types of things over the years, albeit in some of these other cases I think they did as much other stuff they became known for to not quite be considered as destructive a cultural influence.

Outside of "black comedies" you also have the entire genera of black gang movies, which are thankfully not as prevalent as they could be due to the various shootings they have inspired (right there in the theaters) when multiple groups from that culture converge on the same place to see it and act pretty much like the movie suggests they do. Outside those violent incidents (which add to the glamour) these movies then turn around and do as much if not more to glamourize the "Git rich or die trying" lifestyle than rap music, while also selling all of the same garbage Tyler Perry does.

To my way of thinking, the best thing you can do is well... pretty much just keep living, pointing out the problems with the culture when you get the chance, pointing out the stereotypes and how people do not want to actually BE that no matter how much they see it in movies, and similar things. With time, some will listen, and maybe eventually enough people will to the point where this kind of behavior really will just be people sounding off about racist garbage. Of course honestly I doubt you'll ever see many changes in your lifetime, simply because there are millions to be made, political careers to maintain, and voting blocks to be manipulated, all contingent on black america staying pretty much right where it is. Tyler Perry and his ilk need their money, and guys like Al Sharpton, Jessie Jackson, and the NAACP need this culture with a continued chip on it's shoulder to follow them, so they can broker their influence. After all, if Black America wasn't what it was, things like the whole "Zimmerman" case wouldn't have happened, complete with false information about what the guy slamming his head into the ground looked like. That case, and others like it, act as a demonstration as to what these leaders/groups can do, just or not, and that's a big deal when election time comes around and politicians are offering power and payouts to those who can bring them votes.

Deserved or not, I tend to give Eddie Murphy a general pass as he's done some genuinely good stuff on his own, however his lack of many big successes means he's gone through long periods of "anything for a paycheck". His period of doing Disney movies was... interesting... I kind of give "Nutty Professor" a pass here largely because he had a hard act to follow with it being basically a remake of one of Disney's more classic movies. For the most part it was weight humor. The follow up "The Clumps" however was closer to what your talking about, and pretty bad, mostly he tried to do an entire movie around his talent for playing various characters interacting with each other by using different makeup for each one, which was cool, but not enough to base a movie around. It was a sequel to "Nutty Professor" and really I don't think it was a good idea... at all.

ok i was very confused when i walked into this thread i couldnt understand how any of those films by tyler perry could be considered black comedies and then OHHH black sterotype comedies.. yeah different things and i dont blame you

Since the Escapist's stupid Anti-Spyware Ads ate my long post:

Yes, I enjoy black comedies. Except Tyler Perry, who makes an unmitigated shitstorm of terrible everything.

Some movies reinforce negative stereotypes, but that isn't causing racial tension or gang violence.

You are able to like or dislike whatever you want, and that is your choice.

I don't think I've seen many, looking at the list you have given I have seen...none of them, but I do know of them and I know the actors. I have seen Dr.Doolittle with Eddie Murphy, that count? I certainly don't love black stereotype comedy, but I am sure it is funny every once in awhile.

Oh, I have seen Scary Movie and there is a character named Shorty in it, also in the second one. Every scene he was in was basicly a "black" comedy moment...right? I might be wrong. Might be more of a stoner/black mix. Here is some scenes from the first one. So Scary Movie spoilers.

I actually knew people like that in middle school.

krazykidd:

Queen Michael:
Could you name some of these comedies?

I'm talking about comedies with:

Eddy murphy
Chris Rock
Kevin hart
Ice cube
Tyler perry

Movies like:

Big mama's house
Madea's big happy family
Love and basketball
Diary of a mad black woman
Death at a funeral
Barbershop
Are we there yet?
Good hair
The nutter professor
Think like a man
The ride along
Soul plane
First sunday
Friday
Boyz n the hood
Lottery ticket
Baby boy
Half baked
Mac and devin go to high school
How high

And anything Tyler perry makes. Seriously i think Tyler perry took black people back 20 years with his shotty movies.

So all of the terrible movies that no one should ever ever ever EVER waste time on.

Do you like black comedies?

No. They're moronic.

Do you think they enforce negative stereotypes?

Yea. Sure. And the fact that they even get made erodes my respect for humanity.

Am i overreacting ?

Not really. Underreacting, maybe. How you could ever watch them in the first place boggles the mind.

What do you think?

See above.

.....

For the record, that's NOT what "black comedy" means.
A black comedy (dark comedy) is a comic work that employs black humor, which, in its most basic definition, is humor that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor.
The term black humor (from the French humour noir) was coined by the surrealist theoretician André Breton in 1935, to designate a sub-genre of comedy and satire in which laughter arises from cynicism and skepticism, often relying on topics such as death.

While film and television often reflects social change, and once every blue moon encourages a radical social or political point, they never cause social change. This is because they're products. Therefore, they very well might encourage casual racism or negative societal attitudes, but they're not responsible to do any different. They are a product to be bought and while many people on here don't like them, enough do to make them economically viable.

I live in Europe where Tyler Perry gets very few films released. His audience is in Northern America. When he can't make a buck over there, it'll be social change. However, I was under the impression that the majority of his audience was black? If I were you, and had a problem with these representations, I'd raise my children honestly with that belief. Real social change takes many generations.

Anyway, for your actual questions, I don't judge films on the ethnicity of the cast or director. Things like "Big Mommas House" don't appeal, and I've never seen them, but I got a guilty laugh out of "White Chicks" and (when I was younger) "Dr Dolittle"

Don't tend to get many of those movies over here, though lots of other movies have a crap black comic relief character.

Yeah, pushing a very negative stereotype...isn't that the point?

What I'm taking away from this thread is that what I though was the one thing I would never get called racist for (liking Tyler Perry movies) is apparently racist. You learn something new every day.

I think the only black comedy I like is Coming to America, which is also the only Eddie Murphy movie I like.

Other than that, "black" comedies are centered around a culture I know very little about. So whatever humor it might have will be lost on me.

BQE:

These gentlemen are correct, that is nowhere close to the actual understood definition of black comedy. I think the word you are implying in your phrasing is Black People Comedy. I'm not sure if this particular omission was due to an oversight or an intentional attempt to avoid offense.

That's a "Genetic fallacy" just so you know. Words are a social construction as such they change when used in different contexts. If you read what the guy said it's clear what he means.

Ieyke:
[
For the record, that's NOT what "black comedy" means.
A black comedy (dark comedy) is a comic work that employs black humor, which, in its most basic definition, is humor that makes light of otherwise serious subject matter. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor.
The term black humor (from the French humour noir) was coined by the surrealist theoretician André Breton in 1935, to designate a sub-genre of comedy and satire in which laughter arises from cynicism and skepticism, often relying on topics such as death.

You same as him "Genetic fallacy." Not that it makes anything you said wrong, it's just not vary relevant.

Soviet Heavy:

Johnny Novgorod:
Do you like black comedies? Not particularly. I liked Big Mama and Death at a Funeral though.

Watch the original Death At a Funeral. It's a MUCH better film. (Directed by Frank Oz!)

I did and I liked it. I'm still weirded by Peter Dinklage playing the same character in both original and remake while the rest of the cast got swapped.

krazykidd:
TL;DR I can't watch black comedies anymore. Those comedies that use a lot of negative black stereotypes unironically to get a few laughs. I feel they encourage prejudice, and hinder the fight against racism.

Yeah... I came into this thread thinking you meant Black Comedies(which I fucking love), as opposed to Comedy about/by black people.

To answer your question about that particular subject... I dunno, I suppose I find most Wayans brothers films to be pretty poor, but I don't think it's got anything to do with their race.

Nosferatu2:

BQE:

These gentlemen are correct, that is nowhere close to the actual understood definition of black comedy. I think the word you are implying in your phrasing is Black People Comedy. I'm not sure if this particular omission was due to an oversight or an intentional attempt to avoid offense.

That's a "Genetic fallacy" just so you know. Words are a social construction as such they change when used in different contexts. If you read what the guy said it's clear what he means.

For the record:

Logicalfallacies.info:

The genetic fallacy is committed when an idea is either accepted or rejected because of its source, rather than its merit.

Even from bad things, good may come; we therefore ought not to reject an idea just because of where it comes from, as ad hominem arguments do.

Equally, even good sources may sometimes produce bad results; accepting an idea because of the goodness of its source, as in appeals to authority, is therefore no better than rejecting an idea because of the badness of its source. Both types of argument are fallacious.

I believe you are incorrect. My correction of his phrasing has absolutely nothing to do with his reasoning, logic, or premise. I merely pointed out his inaccurate use of the terminology. I did not proclaim him to be to wrong as a result of his inaccurate wording.

The points I made had nothing to do with the words he used, the origination of the argument or where the idea came from. Therefore, this has nothing do with genetic fallacies, or even fallacies at all.

As for the comment about words, other than the fact that I would wager some Linguistics and Etymological professors may take issue with that particular definition, everything I said after the paragraph you quoted had to do the topic krazykidd was trying to bring attention to.

Please don't be offended, and in the future I'd appreciate it if you could take any further discrepancies with my use of language and fallacies to personal messages. I adore discussing logic but it has no place in this thread; That said this will be last time I bring it up here.

shogunblade:

I think it depends on the movie. With the exception of one joke, I didn't find Death at a Funeral very negative, really. If you made the cast white, it wouldn't be all that different (I still wouldn't find it very funny). Movies like the Friday films I think do, but nobody in those films are anything but cartoon characters (I remember the Hispanic characters in the sequel being nothing more than "What you saying to me now, Holmes?" types, and it was bad then).

Funny you should say that. Death at a Funeral (2010) was a remake of a 2007 film by the same name from the UK, with an all white cast. While they are similar from a storyboarding perspective (if you were to just read a synopsis of both films you might be convinced that the 2010 movie was a straight remake), tonally I felt that the 2007 movie was the superior of the two. The 2007 movie felt more subdued with better emotional build up, making the comedic parts even funnier given the context. The 2010 movie seemed to be in more of a rush to speed through the scenes from slapstick setpiece to setpiece, with simpler character motivations and more of an emphasis on broad humor and loud one-liners. The byproduct of an idea-starved Hollywood during a remake craze where foreign films were being snatched up for re-adaption to U.S. audiences. Don't get me wrong, we got some pretty good films during that time, but I feel Death at a Funeral (2010) wasn't one of those.

krazykidd:

I'm talking about comedies with:

Chris Rock

Out of curiosity, are you talking about all of his work or just his later work? What did you think of his stand up from the 90's, specifically Bring the Pain? I noticed in a previous post that you mentioned liking the Boondocks, and if you pay close enough attention you can see quite a bit of Chris Rock's influence in parts of the show (in some jokes more blatantly than others).

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