Do You Have a Mental Disorder and How Much Does it Affect You?

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I have ADHD. I've been taking Concerta for I don't even know how long. It still affects me as the pills effects are not as strong. When I forgot to take them, I would be so uncontrollable and hyper the teacher would have to call my parents. I get by now, as it doesn't affect me as much as I've grown older. The point is, do you have a similar ailment and does it affect you in any amount?

Bipolar disorder, and I've just had to defer taking my final university exams for a year so yeah, it majorly affects my life. Medication's been hit and miss, but even though Lithium (currently combined with an antidepressant) does go some way to helping, I honestly cannot remember when I last felt normal. Certainly not in the last five years. Presumably at some point in my teens, but even then I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so... I guess I'm just crazy through and through.

I have dysgraphia which while in school was highly detrimental as it keeps my hand wiring from being legible with everything being on a computer and not being expected to write it rarely if ever comes into play. Still back then I was in remedial everything for no damned reason. Constantly thought of of being unable to read because apparently reading and hand writing are the same thing to a lot of teachers don't ask me why and failing math because despite getting the correct answer 80% of the grade is showing your work which I was not able to do.

Now I live in sane land where if you get the write answer no one gives a damn how you got it and I can just say "E-Mail is my preferred method of contact" and never have to write ever again.

I'm ADD also, minus the hyperactive.

It makes it pretty difficult to hold my attention on anything I'm not very interested in. For example, if I'm reading a book and it gets a little dull, I can keep on reading for pages but my mind wanders and I don't absorb any of the information I've just read. Eventually I'll realize this and I'll have to go back several pages to re-read everything, often repeating the same mistake and having to read the same three pages several times over. Even when I willfully try to keep my attention on something boring I just can't keep it up for long.

On top of that I tend to put things down without thinking about where I'm putting them because my mind is always somewhere else, so I lose my car keys every other day and I never know where I've put my tools. My life is consistently a clusterfuck.

But it has its advantages too. I'm an extremely fast learner when I am interested in the topic or task. When something grabs my attention, I become a single-minded information sponge and a perfectionist. I'll learn every detail and pick it up like I've been doing it for years. In school I was only ever A+ or F, depending on the class and whether it held my interest or not.

Medication (Ritalin) tends to balance things out a bit, but I stopped taking it years ago, because I find ADD is actually useful now that I understand it better and know how to apply it to my advantage.

I used to work with a kid with ADHD, yeah sometimes he'd go crazy-hyper in the evenings when his pills were wearing off. Personally, I found it hilarious, I hope I have a kid like that one day :-D

Myself, I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome as a child, though nowadays it'd more properly be known as Higher Functioning Autism. Strictly, it's a developmental disorder, but it's usually classed along with these sorts of things so I might as well mention it. It affects me a lot, on one hand I have a job, a good degree and a few friends so I'm better off than many but on the other hand, I still find it impossible to act socially 'normal' and connect with most other people, so that sucks. Still, I've found a good niche in life and I'm happy with my lot, so it's all good.

I have Asperger's (actually diagnosed, not internet self-diagnosis as seems to be the fad) and OCD. I'm mostly okay with them. The former can make things awkward at times and I have trouble knowing when to shut up about my hobbies, but since I sort of have this persona as being the slightly odd goofball, people are usually cool with my quirks. And hey, I really enjoy said hobbies, so at least I have fun. The latter is just annoying, given that everything I read anything I have this compulsive need to count the lines of text to see if the grand total is divisible by three. Yes, this includes street signs.

I was recently diagnosed with depression and anxiety after having a panic attack at my desk and slicing my hand open causing me to lose my job. It wasn't the first time I've had one but it was the worst one I've had and it was surrounded by utterly foul moods that led to me staying in bed for 15 hours at a time. Not fun!

Nope, no mental disorders to speak of.
I'm just really lucky, I suppose.

No disorder, I'm inexcusably socially awkward.

No but I'm from a family full of mental disorders and I take medication for mild social anxiety and just really because I don't feel right without it.

Eamar:
Bipolar disorder, and I've just had to defer taking my final university exams for a year so yeah, it majorly affects my life. Medication's been hit and miss, but even though Lithium (currently combined with an antidepressant) does go some way to helping, I honestly cannot remember when I last felt normal. Certainly not in the last five years. Presumably at some point in my teens, but even then I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so... I guess I'm just crazy through and through.

I too have been diagnosed with Bipolar disorder and at the moment it has put me on the fence about deferring my final exams for my degree as well.
Before my diagnosis I found that my condition had made me fairly reckless, particularly with regards to alcohol and drugs, and it has cost me one relationship with a girl from my uni, not to mention alienating me from my friends I had made there. Since my diagnosis I've been housebound for the most part (self imposed), but my two best friends from childhood and my brother make it manageable.
Through medication and counselling I have been able to make some attempt to work from home, and learned to identify the warning signs that indicate when I'm about to enter a reckless phase (persistent since my teens).
Overall, it has impacted my life negatively, but I'm working to get past it and I'm confident that I'm going to sort things out for the better.

Eamar:
Bipolar disorder, and I've just had to defer taking my final university exams for a year so yeah, it majorly affects my life. Medication's been hit and miss, but even though Lithium (currently combined with an antidepressant) does go some way to helping, I honestly cannot remember when I last felt normal. Certainly not in the last five years. Presumably at some point in my teens, but even then I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so... I guess I'm just crazy through and through.

If it's not too personal a question, do you mind if I ask what your symptoms are and how confident you are in your diagnosis?

I've had a front row seat to the mental health system in my country, and a mis-diagnosis of bi-polar when someone has depressive or anxiety disorders is disturbingly commonplace. It seems to be par for the course to medicate first and take a closer look later.

BloatedGuppy:
If it's not too personal a question, do you mind if I ask what your symptoms are and how confident you are in your diagnosis?

I've had a front row seat to the mental health system in my country, and a mis-diagnosis of bi-polar when someone has depressive or anxiety disorders is disturbingly commonplace. It seems to be par for the course to medicate first and take a closer look later.

Very confident. Bipolar disorder is actually massively under-diagnosed here - I was stuck with a diagnosis of unipolar depression for years, despite it being painfully obvious (to me and everyone in close contact with me) that something more was going on. Even when I finally got referred to a psychiatrist, he wasn't confident making the call (his speciality was eating disorders), so I was referred on to a world-leading specialist in bipolar disorders, who finally confirmed what I pretty much already knew by that point.

Because it's such a life-changing, permanent diagnosis, medical professionals in the UK are reluctant to diagnose it, especially in young people. I guess it's understandable, but it would have been really helpful if I'd been diagnosed earlier.

As for my symptoms, I get really long descents into crippling depression which last several months. When I'm severely depressed, even simple things like taking a shower feel like massive achievements. It's common for me not to leave one room for days or weeks at a time. I don't even play games or read in those periods, so it's not like normal procrastination or anything like that, I simply don't have the energy or motivation to do anything.

Then I get manic/hypomanic phases, where I constantly feel like I've drunk three or four pots of coffee (complete with physical symptoms - shakiness, heart racing, etc). My thoughts race, and I become irritable and frustrated with other people because they can't keep up and don't make the same weird mental connections I do. Sometimes these phases are useful - I've produced First class essays in a single night (complete with all the reading), written poems my teachers mistook for Shelley and Wordsworth, and finished 2 hour exams in 20 minutes. But often they're really unhelpful, when my thoughts move so fast I'm unable to read or write a single sentence, when I decide to run out into traffic because it's fun, or when I spend a fortnight's budget in an afternoon because hey, why not?

Worst of all are the mixed states, when I'm both depressed and manic at the same time. I have literally gone from dancing around my room in the most incredible, gymnastic way to weeping because I'll never be a superhero in the time it takes to play the average three minute song. In this state I'll often hallucinate - anything from seeing the same cat repeatedly emerging from a flower bed I'm looking at, to some creepy guy standing right behind me, to hearing random choral music when I'm walking around town.

In all of these states I have suicidal thoughts and urges. In fact, I've long been convinced that, regardless of my actual wishes, my life will eventually end in suicide - whether it be through the despair of depression, the recklessness of mania or the desperation of a mixed state. I hope I'm wrong and that medication and other treatments will eventually bring everything under control, but I've come so close on so many occasions, and every time I come closer. I'm honestly not trying to sound dramatic or anything, this is just how it is.

This doesn't even begin to cover all the symptoms I've had, but I hope it goes some way to explaining the reality of bipolar disorder. It's not something to be taken lightly, or a diagnosis to be handed out willy nilly, and it's definitely not the romantic, "touched by fire" thing some people like to make it out to be.

EDIT: If anyone's interested, I wrote a very open and honest article about living with bipolar a while ago: http://blog.mindyourheadoxford.org/post/73219232329/emma-moyse-speaking-candidly-about-bipolar-disorder I'm not trying to promote myself or anything (it's not my blog), I just hope it might be useful to people trying to understand the condition for whatever reason.

I was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome in 2000 before being re-diagnosed with it 2010 after it turned out the one who diagnosed me lost the original paperwork or some crap like that. It has always made me incredibly strange and introverted. Now in my early twenties I have friends who are at least as quirky as me despite being neuro-typical, two solid jobs, and a good outlook on life. However life as a child was hell, not from my peers as I was always intimidatingly strong, but from teachers who were constantly indignated by my abnormal behaviour.

I was for the most part friendless but often drove away those who tried due to my near total lack of empathy or anything resembling social etiquette. On the plus side I have always found myself intensely determined and able to concentrate on a narrow few things with great zeal. This allowed me to flourish artistically and become accomplished at things I do not like.

Nowadays I still struggle with many things socially. Ultimately I am still not fully integrated into societal norms and though I feel little need to I still feel that I could do a little bit better but have no one I know of who could help me as I am too well off to get help but not normal enough to not attract unwanted attention.

I have a number of issues, which are thankfully mild enough to not require medication. Not that I could afford it if they did. Firstly, I am transsexual. Which while no longer classified as a mental disorder still carries the stigma of it, and pretty much has a major impact on every part of my life. I am mildly bipolar. Enough so that I didn't even realize it until I started seeing a therapist some years ago. Most time it really doesn't affect me, but other times I can sink into a deep depression, complete with suicidal thoughts over absolutely nothing, that can last anywhere from a few hours to days. The manic phases are worse though, because I'm less likely to realize something is wrong until I've already done something incredibly stupid,like as mentioned above blowing my savings or money I need on things like rent or bills on stupid things, or make rash poor decisions that seem totally to make sense at the time. I've mostly learned to never make any kind of major decisions or spend large sums of money without seriously thinking about it for days or weeks... Leading me to over analyze... But I'd rather than than quit my job to sell knives again....

I also suffer from severe anxiety disorder, especially about social situations. I find it hard to interact with strangers or even sometimes people I know. Sometimes I can be walking around and suddenly become convinced that people are stalking or about to attack me. Some days I'm completely unable to leave my house for fear of being attacked. Fortunately I work from home now. I can't stand to be in loud, crowded rooms, or to perform in any way in front of people. Sometimes even going to shows I become convinced that people are laughing at and mocking me, instead of the people on stage. It's been bad enough sometimes that I've had to leave halfway through things I paid for, and fight the urge to literally run out of the building, fearing for my life. Completely illogical, but I can't stop it once my mind starts on those paths. That probably has the biggest negative effect on my life.

Aspergers up in here. I've lived a fairly lonely, reclusive life, but to be honest, I've kind of been okay with that.

Most of the time...

Also, not sure if this is because of the Aspergers or not, but I don't appear to be capable of romantic attraction.

Dysgraphia, dyslexia, auditory processing disorder... a bunch of a fun, happy learning disabilities. The bizarre thing is, despite most of them focusing on literacy and reading comprehension, I'm actually a great reader. Math, not reading or English, happens to be my worst subject. Still though, my handwriting's god awful, and I have a tendency to misspell or leave out words in my writing... Yeah, elementary was not a happy time for me. I was in special ed up until middle school, and didn't learn to actually honestly read until I was in third grade. I did really get into reading in fourth grade, though, to the point where I was able to graduate out of special ed. So I'm mostly over this stuff now.

Also, if my father's anything to go off of, I have mild autism but... well, there's a reason why my father's not a psychologist.

Saetha:

Also, if my father's anything to go off of, I have mild autism but... well, there's a reason why my father's not a psychologist.

Heh, my parents are the same. I'm 99% sure I'm not though - I'm just a nerd (hence obsessive about certain things) and not as affectionate around them as they'd like.

Full blown Catatonic Schizophrenia. It was thought to be undifferentiated for a long time until I realized one of my best friends wasn't real. I'm also a transsexual woman, which has the effect you'd expect it to have.

For a good long while I was basically isolated from everyone and everything out of fear of both things, but more recently I have made the decision to just jump right in and live life. Even if I'm visited by figments of my deteriorating brain, or told I'm lying to the world and myself, at least I'll know that I was true to my own mind. If anyone's going to have a problem with my mental health, it ain't going to be me.

I was deeply, deeply depressed and riddled with anxiety for most of my life, but then one day in my mid 20s, something in my brain just snapped and I wasn't depressed anymore. I didn't have to take any drugs, I didn't see a doctor, and I didn't experience any physical brain trauma. I really don't know exactly what happened. I look at old photos of me and it's like I'm a different person. I just sort of laid out what I felt I needed to do, developed routines for things where I couldn't be depressed, broke out of the ones that were bringing me down, and exercised a lot more. Maybe I just stopped letting other people tell me what to do, maybe I just quit caring about myself, maybe I gained some perspective, or maybe I found a nice still place in my brain that centers me when I feel off. I always thought I'd just sit down and write out what "fixed" me, but I honestly can't put my finger on any one thing.

I was diagnosed as depressed with major anxiety issues. Thankfully, I've gotten passed it now for the most part. Whatever's left is mainly just residual, and causes no real problems. If anyone has anxiety or depression I strongly advise seeking a counselor, as it really does help to talk to someone like that.
I would avoid Psychologists and Psychiatrists though, they're more likely to pump you full of drugs than actually do anything helpful.

EDIT: Also, stop listening to Emo/Goth/Dark songs. They're just gonna drive you even further down. And for god's sake, don't listen to "Getting Away with Murder" while depressed.

Eamar:
I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so...

Regardless of how much time you spent pondering it, that doesn't change the fact that it's an eating disorder, not a mental disability.

OT: Not sure if this counts as a mental disorder either, but it's the closest thing I have. I'm diagnosed with chronic depression and I've been on antidepressants for the last year or so, though I just started ordering my stuff from Canada to save money. It seems a lot of people I bump into seem to have some form of 'mental disorder' but I hesitate to take any of them seriously without seeing a doctor's note. I know some people genuinely do have obstacles to overcome, but the vast majority I encounter just seem to crave the attention that comes along with a mental disability.

I'll give you an example. I went to highschool with this girl (we even briefly dated) and I knew her from the beginning of my sophomore year to the end of Junior year. She was attractive, popular among pretty much everyone, and was always very collected. She never displayed any abnormal behavior, never seem challenged academically (in fact she always had high grades) but after knowing her for two years she suddenly came out as being autistic.

I know I'm generalizing a bit, but that's certainly how it seems sometimes. But then again I hear autism and similar disorders are more common than ever, so what do I know?

For me dyslexia I still cant read right and its really messed up my ability to spell (might not be related) but I still to this day at 27 will mix letters from words up or mix the words in the sentence up. I was able to read to my self with out as much trouble but still I could never get a book report right. The biggest issue for me is as an adult I sometimes come off to others as an illiterate. I still try to and love to read everything from Lovecraft to Shakespeare fighting to not let the disability get the best of me.

Eamar:

BloatedGuppy:
If it's not too personal a question, do you mind if I ask what your symptoms are and how confident you are in your diagnosis?

I've had a front row seat to the mental health system in my country, and a mis-diagnosis of bi-polar when someone has depressive or anxiety disorders is disturbingly commonplace. It seems to be par for the course to medicate first and take a closer look later.

Very confident. Bipolar disorder is actually massively under-diagnosed here - I was stuck with a diagnosis of unipolar depression for years, despite it being painfully obvious (to me and everyone in close contact with me) that something more was going on. Even when I finally got referred to a psychiatrist, he wasn't confident making the call (his speciality was eating disorders), so I was referred on to a world-leading specialist in bipolar disorders, who finally confirmed what I pretty much already knew by that point.

Because it's such a life-changing, permanent diagnosis, medical professionals in the UK are reluctant to diagnose it, especially in young people. I guess it's understandable, but it would have been really helpful if I'd been diagnosed earlier.

As for my symptoms, I get really long descents into crippling depression which last several months. When I'm severely depressed, even simple things like taking a shower feel like massive achievements. It's common for me not to leave one room for days or weeks at a time. I don't even play games or read in those periods, so it's not like normal procrastination or anything like that, I simply don't have the energy or motivation to do anything.

Then I get manic/hypomanic phases, where I constantly feel like I've drunk three or four pots of coffee (complete with physical symptoms - shakiness, heart racing, etc). My thoughts race, and I become irritable and frustrated with other people because they can't keep up and don't make the same weird mental connections I do. Sometimes these phases are useful - I've produced First class essays in a single night (complete with all the reading), written poems my teachers mistook for Shelley and Wordsworth, and finished 2 hour exams in 20 minutes. But often they're really unhelpful, when my thoughts move so fast I'm unable to read or write a single sentence, when I decide to run out into traffic because it's fun, or when I spend a fortnight's budget in an afternoon because hey, why not?

Worst of all are the mixed states, when I'm both depressed and manic at the same time. I have literally gone from dancing around my room in the most incredible, gymnastic way to weeping because I'll never be a superhero in the time it takes to play the average three minute song. In this state I'll often hallucinate - anything from seeing the same cat repeatedly emerging from a flower bed I'm looking at, to some creepy guy standing right behind me, to hearing random choral music when I'm walking around town.

In all of these states I have suicidal thoughts and urges. In fact, I've long been convinced that, regardless of my actual wishes, my life will eventually end in suicide - whether it be through the despair of depression, the recklessness of mania or the desperation of a mixed state. I hope I'm wrong and that medication and other treatments will eventually bring everything under control, but I've come so close on so many occasions, and every time I come closer. I'm honestly not trying to sound dramatic or anything, this is just how it is.

This doesn't even begin to cover all the symptoms I've had, but I hope it goes some way to explaining the reality of bipolar disorder. It's not something to be taken lightly, or a diagnosis to be handed out willy nilly, and it's definitely not the romantic, "touched by fire" thing some people like to make it out to be.

EDIT: If anyone's interested, I wrote a very open and honest article about living with bipolar a while ago: http://blog.mindyourheadoxford.org/post/73219232329/emma-moyse-speaking-candidly-about-bipolar-disorder I'm not trying to promote myself or anything (it's not my blog), I just hope it might be useful to people trying to understand the condition for whatever reason.

Eamar for what its worth you have my respect for being able to live with it so long and I feel for you big time

Tourette's Syndrome.

It's not too bad, really. It means that I work more slowly than others (unless I'm really concentrating) and I occasionally scare and confuse people with random spasms and gestures, but it's not NEARLY as bad as it was when I was a kid.

ADHD tendencies, I reckon. My concentration skills are so bad even focusing long enough to write a post on a forum is hard work. Often I have to do it in sessions, which usually leads me to say "Fuck it" and close the tab. I reckon only 1/3 of what I write actually gets posted. Doesn't bother me that much, but it did make studying a total bitch. Fortunetly I was one of those students that never had to study to get good grades. Well, except for math - which I failed horribly.

Apart from that I developed social phobia/anxiety after getting assaulted by a junkie as a 16 year old. That event spiralled into destroying my entire life, but that's a story I'd rather not get into.
How to explain it... Basically, imagine you're extremely afraid of spiders(I know it's hard, but try ;D). Now everyone in the world is a spider. Go out and try to ignore the spiders. Also they all want to eat you.

That's pretty much how it felt. It's not as bad these days. I'm still extremely self-conscious when I'm outside, however it doesn't cripple me as much. Situations like job interviews are difficult as fuck to get through though.

lostlambda:
dyslexia

Saetha:
Dysgraphia, dyslexia, auditory processing disorder... a bunch of a fun, happy learning disabilities.

Learning disabilities aren't mental disorders.

I struggle with lifelong severe depression. My first attempt to die was drowning at age 7 with a couple other attempts in later years (even survived a hanging...barely). Some days, it is a struggle to get much done. While I did go to college, worked as an esl teacher, published a book, I can't help thinking how I'm a failure and depression has ruined so much in my life from burning friendship bridges to self sabotage. Honestly, with my birthday nearing, I'm considering heading out to a certain bridge before net is built (I track the news on it daily) so I'd say depression affects me a lot. Also it is very isolating as I have never met anyone else who dealt with daily suicidal thoughts for close to three decades now.

I used to have severe social anxiety that kept me from asking for directions and leading me to being lost. Luckily, I have overcome that.

I have ADD, mild claustrophobia, panic attacks, and Anxiety issues. And I suspect(though this one hasn't been diagnosed yet) some variation of depression.

The ADD I have been off medication for for 15 years now. I still occasionally get slightly distracted. But for the most part, I've learned to control myself and my attention span.

The mild claustrophobia is mostly in crowds. Put too many people around me and it feels like there is no ecape and that the metaphorical walls are closing in on me(funny enough, I'm fine with small, cramped spaces).

The panic attacks tend to go with the mild claustrophobia as it will send me into a panic attack. My asthma can also be triggered from them.

The anxiety attacks/issues make it hard for me to be a productive member of society. I just got a new doctor who is actively trying to help so I haven't really been taking the medication long enough to say if it's fully working or not but I have been able to actually do things I need to do without forcing myself for the past week and a half or so that I've been on it. If I recall correctly (I'm not at home so I can't look at my prescription) he has me on Buproprin or something like that(I know it starts with a "B") and I have to take it twice a day. Sometimes the anxiety actually affects my asthma by dropping a metaphorical weight on my chest and making it hard for me to breathe causing me to be sent into asthma attacks easier.

The depression is mostly mood based. And has (very recently in fact) sunk me so low that I've contemplated suicide. Luckily (I guess?) I was also in the middle of a serious anxiety attack so in addition to general laziness I really couldn't move much so it didn't send me into actually attempting it but it was like that for me for 2 days in a row(which hasn't happened for 16 or so years).

Soon as I can get the money and a referral from my doctor though, I'm going to go and talk to a psychiatrist and see what they say. But I know I tend to exhibit a lot of the signs of it (which really means nothing other than I exhibit signs of it as it could be related to something else or could be something else). Though my doctor suspects I may be bipolar if I actually do have depression since apparently anxiety and depression are two different sides of the bipolar spectrum. So we'll see on that last point. Everything else though (minus the depression) is actually diagnosed and technically falls under mental health/disorders.

Johnny Novgorod:

lostlambda:
dyslexia

Saetha:
Dysgraphia, dyslexia, auditory processing disorder... a bunch of a fun, happy learning disabilities.

Learning disabilities aren't mental disorders.

By that logic, Tourette's isn't either.

Mossberg Shotty:

Eamar:
I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so...

Regardless of how much time you spent pondering it, that doesn't change the fact that it's an eating disorder, not a mental disability.

Eating disorders are mental illnesses. The OP asked about "mental disorders", which people seem to be taking as a catch-all term for mental illnesses and neurological disorders. If depression, bipolar and anxiety fit the bill, eating disorders do too.

Eamar:

Mossberg Shotty:

Eamar:
I had bulimia, which obviously dominated my every thought, for several years so...

Regardless of how much time you spent pondering it, that doesn't change the fact that it's an eating disorder, not a mental disability.

Eating disorders are mental illnesses. The OP asked about "mental disorders", which people seem to be taking as a catch-all term for mental illnesses and neurological disorders. If depression, bipolar and anxiety fit the bill, eating disorders do too.

It's amazing how quickly we got to:
"your problems don't fit the ephemerally ill-defined category stated in the OP so don't count as real problems (unlike mine)"
Isn't it?

OT, depression twice, never taken medication just counselling so I guess it really hasn't affected me that much. I've had the odd week where getting out of bed, showering and even eating have been really difficult and I've had a couple of panic attacks at work.

CpT_x_Killsteal:

I would avoid Psychologists and Psychiatrists though, they're more likely to pump you full of drugs than actually do anything helpful.

Psychologists aren't physicians, so the majority don't have prescribing privileges (and the ones who do don't have full access to all medications for all conditions). I'd also point out that for some (though certainly not all) patients, medication actually turns out to be the most helpful treatment, so I'm wary of warning people off psychiatric help myself.

Cartographer:

It's amazing how quickly we got to:
"your problems don't fit the ephemerally ill-defined category stated in the OP so don't count as real problems (unlike mine)"
Isn't it?

I must still have more faith in the internet than I thought, because I was genuinely surprised to see that sort of thing popping up in this thread. Which obviously I really shouldn't have been -.-

Diagnosed Bi-polar here. It has had a large impact on my life. I've lost a couple of girlfriends, a few friends, have been in many fights, and have attempted suicide a couple times because of it.

According to some friends (including a girl whos ex-boyfriend was a diagnosed sufferer) and one psychologist I might also have Intermittent explosive disorder. I certainly appear to have symptoms but I'll wait until I can start seeing a professional long term before jumping to any conclusions.
If I do have it though then it has also impacted my life. I've hurt a lot of people and broken a lot of things in sudden bouts of nigh uncontrollable rage.

I also have some pretty bad insomnia. Sometimes I get so damn sleep deprived that I start to hallucinate, and its always bad hallucinations never any damn good ones. Insomnia has impacted my school and work performance, my memory has suffered, and the irritability from lack of sleep strains my remaining relationships sometimes but it hasn't really hit me too hard.

And this is totally coming from me and not a professional but I think I have some sort of social anxiety disorder. whenever I'm around people or in social situations I feel panicky. Kind of like a cornered rat. I have trouble focusing on anything that isn't the people around me and every damn muscle in my body seems to get really tense.
I actually dropped out of college because I couldn't handle being in classrooms or on a crowded campus anymore. I wasn't able to focus in my crowded classes at all and I greeted every morning of classes with dread. And now the only time I feel comfortable leaving my own house is in the dead of night when most people are home.
I'm also just generally uncomfortable in large open spaces but thats probably something else.

All of this also seems to run in my family xD
I feel so bad for any future kids I might have. Hopefully meds are cheaper in the future or its off to the funny farm with them :p
(I like to make light of not so great situations using humor, its a defense mechanism)

A severe recurring depressive disorder and a combined personality disorder.

It fucks up my life, it gets triggered like PTSD sometimes and it's very persistent.

Eamar:
snip

I clicked on your link and I didnt realise you studied at oxford. Thats genuinely impressive. I find it strange (sorry if im a little ignorant) that someone as intelligent and successful (yes oxford is successful) as yourself could have such thoughts. I also dont mean to sound creepy here but you are a good looking girl too. You clearly have a lot of positives in your life yet you still suffer from serious depression. I know you probably cant control it and its not related to your environment but I would expect this type of illness to affect people who doesnt have much going for them (again I apologise if I seem ignorant)

Im lucky im not affected by anything like this and I cant even imagine what its like but my sympathies are with you

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