The Big Picture: The Simpsons Is Still Funny - Pt. 1

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NinjaDC:
Never really got the whole "Simpsons now are ****" thing"

I heard it a lot as a teenager, from people with access to Sky and the latest episodes, which I did not have. Looking back now, those series (from about 10 to 18) are by far my favourites. Season 18 is currently airing (or re-airing, I dunno) on C4 here in the UK and it is hilarious.

Where I personally found it went downhill was post-movie. The animation changed and seemed slightly off to me, and even though the format was much the same I just didn't find myself laughing at it.

With that said, there is one maxim that will ever and always hold true; there is no such thing as an unfunny Moe episode. I love that seedy little freak.

The audience changed, obviously, but so did the formula. I think it was Groening that talked about how as his personal life changed, as well as that of the staff and writers, the formula changed from being about the comedic antics of Bart Simpson to the sill adventures of Homer Simpson. Watch early seasons and you will see exactly what he's talking about. There is a palpable but subtle transition from things being largely Bart-centric to lots of plots that made Homer essentially the star of the show.

As we grew up, so did the Simpsons, as Bob mentions in the perceptual sense, but in many ways the writing did this pretty literally as well. We all matured together, and I still love the show.

I agree with this, at one point I stopped watching it and just kind of mindlessly attached to the "it's not good anymore" crowd, and then I started watching reruns on tv, found them to be very good, looked at the episode dates, and was surprised to find they were fairly recent

Edit: Seriously, I don't usually write posts this long...sorry about that. The Simpsons was my greatest obsession as a kid/teenager, so I can be quite passionate about it, which the book I've written below makes pretty obvious.

-----

I am a 20-year-old hardcore Simpsons fanatic, so I suppose I should share my experiences and opinions here.

I began watching The Simpsons regularly during season 12, which made me around 10 years old. At the time I was in love with it. At first I didn't realize how much of The Simpsons there was, but FOX showed reruns every weeknight, and I made it a point to watch it every single night. By the time the DVD sets started being released (which I now own 1-13 of and have watched numerous times, including with the commentaries) I'd already seen almost the entire series simply through those reruns.

I loved the show for somewhat different reasons than you put forward. Bart was never one of my favorite characters, and although the fact that it was an adult cartoon that appealed to me at first and got me to start watching, it wasn't what made me want to watch it all the time. It was the brilliantly-written conversational humor and cheeky visual gags, the fact that for every hilarious joke there was also a touching moment, the fact that the show touched on issues that even live-action adult shows were afraid to talk about. Those were the things that always got me, even at a young age.

As I continued to watch, I didn't sense too much of a steady gradual decline. Since I first started watching the new episodes of season 12, I accepted that every once in a while one of the episodes wasn't quite as good as the rest, or that some were just downright bad. Since I didn't have any of the DVD sets at the time, I didn't know which of the reruns I watched were from what seasons, but there wasn't a single rerun I saw that I thought was bad.

To me that seems to disprove your "outgrowing" argument, at least for me. Since I was exposed to the older episodes and the new episodes at the same age, and held the same standards for both (I was too young to do otherwise), I can't see how my age or anything else skewed my opinion. Nobody else I knew was a big Simpsons fan, so there was never anybody who told me that the new episodes weren't as good. I just seemed to accept that the reruns were always excellent, and the new episodes were somewhat hit-or-miss, even if I still enjoyed the new episodes.

As I already said, I sensed no gradual decline in quality. I enjoyed the series all the way through season 15 about the same as I always had...in fact, I remember particularly enjoying the season 15 finale. But when season 16 started, something felt entirely different. It felt like an entirely different show. Every episode just seemed like total crap. I continued to watch regularly through the beginning of season 18, but there were only a few (and I literally mean a few) episodes that I thought were any good, and even those I didn't consider great. I thought that perhaps the show was sucking because they were putting all their efforts into the movie, and when I went to see the movie and enjoyed it, I thought that perhaps now the show would get back on track...but it didn't. I haven't watched the show regularly since then, and I likely never will again.

At the time I guess I assumed that I had outgrown the show, but in retrospect I can't see that as being the case. Once I started buying the DVD sets and watching through them, I still loved every single episode (although I feel personally as though it found its real stride around season 5, keeping a consistent peak quality through season 8), even the few ones I hadn't seen before. It was at this point, rewatching them, that I sensed the gradual decline that began for me after season 10, but I still enjoy everything through season 15. At the time I stopped enjoying the show, however, it wasn't gradual...it was literally that season 16 felt entirely different. Looking back at some of those episodes, I can see why. The voice actors approach to their characters seems to change completely. The show feels much more frantic, the pop culture references are far less subtle, the jokes feel way too forced, and the stories feel much less thought out.

I understand that it's entirely possible, hell even probable, that I'm rationalizing my opinion, and that indeed it was the ages I was when I watched that affected my opinion. But I still stand behind my view that from season 16 and onward, the show became not just not as good, but unwatchable.

I don't know how much of The Simpsons you've seen, MovieBob, but if you're basing your "The Simpsons are still good" argument on the basis that most people say that it sucked after season 10 and you still find season 14 enjoyable...perhaps you should be a little more patient and watch further to see what everyone means. There are 23 seasons now...that;s plenty of time after season 14 for the show to start sucking. Still, if you've actually seen every episode of the series and continue to watch the new episodes, and it's your opinion that it still maintains a certain level of quality, then I suppose we'll just have to agree to disagree.

I'm happy to hear your opinions on my favorite show of all time, and am looking forward to seeing part 2.

For some reason, I can't stand the first season. It's probably due to the fact that the show was still coming together and stuff like the animation and voice acting was still off compared to subsequent seasons, but to me the real Simpsons as I know them started coming together at Season 2.

Also, I can't say I've ever truly despised an episode of the show with the exception of That 90's Show, particularly because it took one of the most important aspects of the Simpsons' backstory (the struggle between Marge and Homer before they marry and Bart is born) and rewrites it for the worst, mostly so that the show can poke fun in a "meh" sort of way at the 90's. I'm sorry, but I just don't buy Homer inventing grunge music, or the way Marge treated him throughout the episode.
That said, it's worth it for this line from Homer: "He who is tired of Weird Al is tired of life."

Also, I just want to point out that above my last comment there are at least 3 people with Pinkie Pie as an avatar, proving my theory that no matter how much you fight FiM, you just can't escape at this point, so you might as well embrace it.

Thank you SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO MUCH Bob for ripping apart the "Wah wah! *blank* went downhill!!" mental condition that an assortment of fans of every single fucking franchise in the world has.

Meh. I don't really agree. I don't really know exactly when The Simpsons went downhill, I think any specific time that can be pinpointed is down to personal preference, but I still think the show is far worse than it used to be. I used to watch it loads when I was a kid and in my early teens, then the channel that was showing it at the time stopped airing it. It showed up again before long on another channel but I never really went back to it. I watched a few episodes here and there, but I didn't watch it anywhere near to what anyone would call regularly. Then more recently I've tried to watch it more as new episodes have come on. Well there's episodes aren't actually new, they're re-runs, but they're still new to me. They also re-run older episodes too.

It's quite clear to me that the older episodes are far better. Their writing was far more witty and natural, and the storylines were very original. But now the newer episodes are bursting at the seams with cringe-worthy dialogue (usually from Marge), tired cliched storylines, and characters that have descended in to nothing more than self parody. The older episodes are still enjoyable, although not all of them are as great as I remember. But that's probably due to me being older, having seen them so many times, and the issues in them (if there are any) not being current anymore. But even with these things affecting the experience, they are still better than most of the newer episodes.

It may be only me, but I did see a slight difference both in tone and writing style by the time Season 9 rolled around, although that may be just because Season 8 is my favorite.
I currently own Seasons 2-12 on DVD. I think I'll go buy 13 and 14 now.

I think what also happened is the fact that the Simpsons became established. When it first came on the air during the late 1980s it was was something audiences had not seen before. The Simpsons was one of those early primetime sitcoms that had a disfunctional family. The Simpsons (and Married with Children which came out around the same time) were unlike their saccharine forebears and contemporaries (the Cleavers, the Bradys, the Waltons, the Tanners). Because of that new take on suburban families and its edgy language and everything else it got viewers and television networks looking at TV families differently. After The Simpsons you got show like Roseanne that focused on disfunctional families.
And during that time it got greater cultural exposure because it received that cultural backlash. George Bush Sr. famously said in a speech American families should be "more like the Waltons and less like the Simpsons." In the backlash against popular culture after the Columbine massacre I remember some critics called out the Simpsons as an example of the media's destruction of the American family. Now after twenty plus years of being on the air the Simpsons is part of the mainstream. It's a television institution in the way that some of the television programs it cut its teeth parodying were. Disfunctional families are the rule rather than the exception now, and so the Simpsons can't have the same punch it used to. And when you're part of the mainstream it's hard to maintain that edge.

I think what also happened is the fact that the Simpsons became established. When it first came on the air during the late 1980s it was was something audiences had not seen before. The Simpsons was one of those early primetime sitcoms that had a disfunctional family. The Simpsons (and Married with Children which came out around the same time) were unlike their saccharine forebears and contemporaries (the Cleavers, the Bradys, the Waltons, the Tanners). Because of that new take on suburban families and its edgy language and everything else it got viewers and television networks looking at TV families differently. After The Simpsons you got show like Roseanne that focused on disfunctional families.
And during that time it got greater cultural exposure because it received that cultural backlash. George Bush Sr. famously said in a speech American families should be "more like the Waltons and less like the Simpsons." In the backlash against popular culture after the Columbine massacre I remember some critics called out the Simpsons as an example of the media's destruction of the American family. Now after twenty plus years of being on the air the Simpsons is part of the mainstream. It's a television institution in the way that some of the television programs it cut its teeth parodying were. Disfunctional families are the rule rather than the exception now, and so the Simpsons can't have the same punch it used to. And when you're part of the mainstream it's hard to maintain that edge.

Sorry about the double post btw. New user.

The He-Man thing was a good reference but as I look back on the 80s era, I'm finding that a lot of the cartoons we watched were done by either Filmation or DIC, including He-Man/She-Ra, Ghostbusters (the original, not the cartoon version of the Ghostbusters movie: The Real Ghostbusters), Bravestarr, Inspector Gadget, Heathcliff, Super Mario Bros., etc. And looking back on these "gems" of the 80s, I'm finding that on the whole, the production quality is pretty bad. Same goes for Voltron, which REALLY did not age well on a fresh viewing. It really makes me appreciate how good shows like Robotech were, despite a convoluted, even nonsensical meshing of three different shows, and re-use of stock footage in various places. Another shining aspect of the decade was the ability to turn adult-level movies into kid-level shows. Bill and Ted was an okay example, Beeltejuice a more sublime one.

It's part of the reason that I wax tragic about how kids today get all the cool shows. Yes I loved me some He-Man and Robotech and Ninja Turtles and such, but man, I really liked some crappy crap as a kid. By the time I was growed up, kids already had Batman and X-Men and Rugrats and Animaniacs and Ren and Stimpy and Doug. Now they have Transformer shows that are way better products than the films, Ben 10, Powerpuff Girls, Foster's, Fairly Odd Parents, Kick Buttowski, a TRON cartoon (!), a Star Wars cartoon not focused on Ewoks or Droids, and I'm sure there are a half-dozen others I'm not even thinking of. The quality of these programs is just getting nuts, and more than a few of them are quite well-written.

I'm going to have to disagree with Bob here.

Yes, there is undeniably a bit of hipsterism involved in Simpsons fandom, so let me just flop my credentials on the table. I didn't start watching Simpsons at all until I started university. So I have no childhood memories of it to taint my views.

And it's telling that all of his examples of "classic" episodes here that were great for different reasons were drawn from first season. Because the character of the show really did change with time.

In the first season and persisting to a diminishing extent into future seasons, the characters of the show were written to be more relatable as representations of normal people. Yeah, Homer was a little bit lazier and stupider than normal, Marge was a little more submissive than normal, Bart was a little more rambunctious than normal and Lisa a little more precocious than normal, but they were all relatable to real people. An audience could see a bit of themselves in each character. And the situations they found themselves in were silly, but still situations real people could imagine themselves in: failing a test, getting tempted into an affair, dealing with a bully, etc. The Simpsons took these situations over the top, but the premise was reasonable.

We don't see that in later Simpson's episodes. The characters have become parodies of themselves. When Homer buys Marge a bowling ball for her birthday, we can laugh with him because there are real people who are that thoughtless. When Homer obsesses over a pot-bellied pig in the Simpsons movie... that's just silly for the sake of silly. And the same thing has happened with the situations in the show. I remember I saw one late-season episode where Bart and Principal Skinner were dueling with peanuts and shrimp on the ends of sticks while the Star Wars Episode 1 music played. I laughed, but I couldn't relate to it.

You can even see a clear change in the comedic timing from early to late seasons. The early shows were definitely slower paced, but there was a subtle wit to them, with characters muttering gags under their breath with a kind of off-beat comedic timing that was subtle yet grabbed you by the ear and pulled you in. The show had juxtaposition like what Yahtzee talks about with video games- The Simpsons had moments free of "wackiness" that made the jokes all the more rewarding. Whereas with many late season episodes I remember feeling like I was watching a constant stream of wackiness where no joke stood out compared to the rest.

I'm in the process of watching early seasons of the Simpsons and I'm already seeing some of the real comedic genius begin to slip away as early as the 3rd season. That's not to say there weren't great episodes later. There were plenty. But I think a lot of the positive feelings people have for the show are less that it was truly funny and more that it is familiar ground that was a part of our shared cultural experience. For the first time in my life, I am finding myself around people young enough that if I quote the Simpsons, they don't recognize the reference and quote back. But that doesn't make those episodes my friends and I used to quote to each other good- much like the Transformers cartoons it's not so much a sign of quality as it is a shared cultural landscape, ritual language we intoned to reinforce that we are of the same group and do indeed know each other.

And unfortunately while reference-citing is common fodder in nerd discussions, it's not really a reason to keep a show on the air. Simpson's lost its edge a long time ago, probably a long time before most people say it did. That doesn't make the show bad, but maybe it's time to let it go before it deteriorates further.

petrolmonkey:

Pretty much all of this. The point I realised it was getting tired with the cameos is when I remember Steve Buscemi being in it. His cameo, from what I can remember, is him walking up to Homer in a dream/fantasy sequence, and saying, Hi Homer, I'm Steve Buscemi" and then saying one other line and that was it.

It was in the middle of a song, when Homer is singing about going to "hobnob with the stars in Malibu".

Steve Buscemi had another appearance by the way, as a bank robber:
http://simpsons.wikia.com/wiki/I_Don%27t_Wanna_Know_Why_the_Caged_Bird_Sings

I have no problem with brief cameos like that; even in the early days they did some cameos along those lines -- remember Barry White's apperance in "Whacking Day"? What about Micky Rooney on "Radioactive Man"?

My big problem is that many (but not all) of their recent celebrity-appearance episodes have involved only the guest and Homer, and those are about the only two characters with lines in the whole episode. See the season opener with Keifer Sutherland, essentially playing Jack Bauer, when The Simpsons has already done a "24" parody episode. The last several episodes have involved very few lines from either Hank Azaria or Harry Shearer, both of whom are incredibly talented actors that are getting paid to say one line each in recent episodes. I suppose Hank Azaria could have told them to give him less screentime so he could do other work like Free Agents, but still...

I think what would really put The Simpsons back on track is to take advantage of their huge cast of characters, and the fact that we still know very little about many of the characters, even after more than 20 years. It took until this season for us to see Superintendent Chalmers for more than a minute at a time; he finally got his own episode and we learned a bit more about him.

personally i've felt that it's gotten better throughout the years. sure the early stuff was fun, but the art, voice acting, and plot intricacy has all improved. rather than saying oh "they've done this before," i just look at how well they do it in a given episode.

the point is though, i find it hilarious when family guy makes fun of them for being tired and played out when that show only got four good seasons before becoming... desperate?

Some good points but still

(a) I still don't like watching the show anymore and

(b) look at how over its lifetime the show has adopted, for example, all the hollywood insider jokes, Homer transitioning from a somewhat buffoonish lug to a retarded, pervy manchild, Lisa Simpson as a Mary Sue for social climbing liberal yuppies, etc.

There were a few seasons there where the show got a little too "cartoony" for me, but that was quite awhile ago. The show has been consistently excellent again for many years now.

Is it just me or did this seem like more of a setup for the next episode.
Not a real episode at all.

I couldn't disagree more with bob on this one. I've actually bothered to go back and rewatch many old episodes of the simpsons and compare them to the more recent seasons and I find the humor of the 90s episodes especially way more witty, clever and overall just funnier and more entertaining. The newer seasons ended up relying too heavily on pop culture, celebrity cameos, and more slapstick dumbed down humor as apposed to humor that was much more indirect and subtle.

The stories even seemed far more original and interesting in the earlier seasons too. For me they started to dip in quality around 13-14. Occasionally I'll find a newer one and still laugh but it is far far less frequent. The movie proves this even further a I watched it and found very little of it to be clever or funny.

I think The Simpsons is still funny, though that may be attributable to me being, well, 13. I watch both new episodes and reruns whenever I can, and I've noticed there is certainly something different from the older to the newer, probably most notably after the new intro. Given my age, I can't really figure out exactly how "good" any of the phases are. However, you can't fault the show for not trying to adapt to modern times, which may be one of the things that turn off older fans.

You know what other childhood show I can love without any sense of irony?

Swat Kats!

Im still trying to decide if it should be the Simpsons are or the simpsons is to be honest. Dont quote me and tell me what it should be, I dont care enough, its mostly just cause I dont usually hear people say the simpsons is.

more OT I still watch the simpsons rather religiously on Sundays despite being a Sophomore in college. In fact, I get so excited for it I do everything so from 8-10 pm, I have nothing to do and nothing will shift me from watching it. This is also why I start to get pissed if a football game looks like its going to be running a bit too long and run over into the Simpsons time slot. And usually the episodes make me at least smile, if not laugh out completely.

so yeah. I still enjoy the simpsons.

I don't know if this episode really works on the Escapist. I can more or less agree as I'm close to the same age, but what Bob is trying to address is mainly for people that are around 30. The average escapist age is probably closer to 20, to which the meaning of what Bob's trying to say won't make as much sense.

so ....

1 more week before you do something more interesting? -.- joy

still waiting on the death and return of super man, AND samurai pizza cats eps there bob

just sayin

Even when I was 11, people a few years older than me said it wasn't as good anymore.

I'm 17 now, and I still like it.
The only reason I came up with for being bad is because it's limited.
I enjoy Futurama more because it's scifi, and has a naturally unlimited scope. It's fiction, they can bring in new concepts whenever they think of them, whereas The Simpsons is grounded in reality.

I don't think it's simply because we grew up. In a vauge generalization it's combined with the fact that material-wise it grew younger. While always kooky in varying ways, the older material was overall more grounded as a satirical sit-com and avoided going over the top as a cartoon.

A point that stands out for me was when Homer was literally weilding his motorcycle against the leader of a biker gang. It wasn't my "this not the beginning of the end, this is THE END" moment (a-la the Thundercat's belt of not being evil); it was just one of many "oh brother - you are trying too hard" moments.

The biggest problem mwith the Simpsons is its massively long run. Its simply worn its self out especially in contrast to the shorter run of Futurama, a show that DID need to run longer but was sadly killed and then resurected in a much lesser form. I think if you look at "New Futurama" you begin to see some of the problems with "New simpsons" a bit more.

Its hard to explain but there was quite a long period where the Simpsons ans Futurama had an almost magical quaility to them in their writing and execution that is hard to keep going. Futurama became downright profound in some places, Leela's Bee coma and Frys Fossil Dog are some of the best examples of this. Personally i also think that the quality of TV has gone up around the Simpsons making it harder or it to stand out. Even hust in terms of cartoons Southpark and Family Guy managed to be much more risky in their satire and futurama could be much more adventurous in its writing.

Actually i Take it back, Fox is the biggest problem with the simpsons but that is a whole other post.

Icehearted:
The audience changed, obviously, but so did the formula. I think it was Groening that talked about how as his personal life changed, as well as that of the staff and writers, the formula changed from being about the comedic antics of Bart Simpson to the sill adventures of Homer Simpson. Watch early seasons and you will see exactly what he's talking about. There is a palpable but subtle transition from things being largely Bart-centric to lots of plots that made Homer essentially the star of the show.

As we grew up, so did the Simpsons, as Bob mentions in the perceptual sense, but in many ways the writing did this pretty literally as well. We all matured together, and I still love the show.

I allways saw it as Bart and Homer were co-stars in the begining but then its seemed they started to expand to other cast members a bit to much with Marge and Lisa getting at least two episodes each a season and then like 6 more minor cast featured episodes.

Speaking of old cartoons, I went to my aunt's house for a while a couple of hours ago, and her grandson's kids (yeah, she's that old) were watching cartoons. I eventually joined them when Looney Tunes went on with Bugs Bunny messing around with Yosemite Sam. That gave me two thoughts:

1. Kids of any generation can easily enjoy that silly slapstick comedy.
2. Classic cartoons tend to show on weekday afternoons, probably because most people who watch them are adults (among other people without school or work).

I don't think you can have it both ways; either the older episodes are better or they are not.

This whole episode essentially said: The Simpsons is to my generation what Bugs Bunny was to previous generations. Nothing wrong with that: Bugs Bunny cartoons are brilliant in a way rarely touched in humor and the music used all but established an entire comedic language for us as tv and movie viewers. It appeals to kids even now because it's funny and it appeals to adults because now there are whole new jokes to get. To be in that class (and I think the Simpsons have earned it) is no small feat.

BUT: humor needs certain things. It needs new places to explore, and it needs a protagonist and an antagonist. In the early years, there were characters to explore and through them, situations to examine. Now we know all the characters and what they have to say. The Simpsons really only becomes awesome again when it has something to say (see also George Carlin's career arc)--and what we need said to us is now being said just as well (if not better) by The Daily Show, Colbert Report and South Park.

It's not that the Simpsons can't be great sometimes or even good frequently but there has been a shift and there's really no getting around that. The jokes aren't for the viewers, they're for America.

And, once you start having guest stars for the sake of using guest stars, that's lame-a sign of weak writing and exhausted ideas. Meryl Streep and Dustin Hoffman played characters on the show, Johnny Cash played a role probably written for him and the results speak for themselves--when compared to a guest spot by, say, The Who.

No, Bob, if there's anything I refuse to believe, it's that I grew up.
Neverland for life!!!
*weeps*

Okay, but seriously, I never got into the Simpsons. I lived in a house with extremely prudish parents who took it into their heads to decry The Simpsons as an abomination against . . . you know, I still don't know. It was never clearly explained to me. I, being one of those few "good kids" who actually listened to his parents (yeah, I don't know what was wrong with me) never actually watched the show. I did watch Futurama when it came out and I thought it was brilliant and I keep thinking I should check out The Simpsons, but I just don't watch TV anymore, so I never remember to do so.
So, what I'm saying in a long, rambling way is that I have no opinion on the matter.

I still watch every week, and will continue to do so as long as it runs (1 year? :'( )
I don't really know why I watch it, or if I think it's improved or not. I can say that I've never really gotten why everybody always says that it went downhill after a certain season, I haven't noticed a significant difference, but I guess I'll know next week.
Though I must say, I much prefer Futurama, it's pure brilliance, while Simpsons is always just fun.

Sorry Bob, but you are way off on this one. First of all, your references to older episodes were all from season 1. That is a poor choice. Those do not hold up well. The golden years are season 2 through 7, 8, 9 or 10 (depending on personal choice). The reason for the greatness of those seasons, especially 2 through about 7, was the writers and producers. Conan O'Brien in season 4 and part of 5 (who of course left for his own show). Al Jean and Mike Reiss left for the Critic (although Jean did return). David X. Cohen left for Futurama. Plus many, many more (often leaving to work with the people I mentioned). Then some really poor show runners, and the Simpsons did go downhill. I still watch those episodes and laugh out loud. I also am amazed at how clever they were. That is no longer true, and it has nothing to do with nostalgia.

The only correlation in tv I can make is MASH. The first 5 seasons were great. Yet Larry Gelbart left after season 4 (he did still consult but was no longer involved in day to day stuff) and Gene Reynolds after season 5. From that point on the show went down hill, just like the Simpsons. The brand is still there, but the people that truly made it great had moved on.

Of course turnover is not always bad. In fact, the Simpsons lost a ton of people after season 3. Yet the group that replaced them brought about what I consider the best season, season 4. 4-6 are simply genius, and there are only a handful of mediocre episodes. Yet the majority of those guys are gone from the show.

I glad you bothered to touch on the concept that tastes change. Five or six years ago, I thought Family Guy was great. I can't stand it now, and not just because it changed into a parody of itself, but upon viewing the older "good" episodes again, I realized I don't really enjoy them anymore either. There are a few laughs to be had here and there, but I've just grown out of it's sense of humor into something totally different.

Or for an older example, I picked up the complete series of Tiny Toon Adventures on the cheap because I remembered loving the show when I was younger. Having rewatched a good chunk of it, I still enjoy it, but for entirely different reasons now. What was funny to me then isn't anymore, but there is tons and TONS of buried jokes and references for adults that I couldn't of gotten. In the first 4 episodes alone they reference: Psycho, The Shining, Eraserhead, Citizen Kane, and The Usual Suspects. That's just....nuts.

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