Why is a Bare Breast More Offensive Than a Severed Arm?

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Izanagi009:

Shamus Young:
Why is a Bare Breast More Offensive Than a Severed Arm?

This question gets asked a lot. "Why is a bare breast more offensive than a severed arm?" This question has been around in one form or another for decades and is usually presented as a challenge or a demand for explanation regarding the way movies are rated, marketed, and edited.

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Excelelnt artilce but I have one question after it.

You had stated that games are bad as systematizing relationships and conversations. So where does that put Visual Novels like Little Busters, Clannad and other such digital media that revolves around conversations and developing relationships between characters in game? Does this mean that the current model of Visual Novel is the best we have limited by a very poor system?

I'd say visual novels have a very poor system for exploring sexuality. In terms of a game exploring sexuality, visual novels often deprive the gamer outright in terms of interactivity, reducing their input to just an occasional, arbitrary choice as to which room in the school to go to, or what time to get up. It's there so we can't deviate from the pre-arranged love story. If this were an actual book with no interactivity, I wouldn't mind; with that, one can still read a meaningful and interesting story that explores sexuality. But in VNs, there is this awkward format in which I can only read one sentence at a time and have to click to move onto the next (or wait for the next sentence to appear), because 90% of the screen is wasted, taken up by a static picture of a girl who is often not doing anything but standing still and pulling a face.

As a book for exploring sexuality, outside of the formatting issues, VNs are often written from the perspective that sex is a reward for the player. The games are often are marketed on the idea that you pick a girl you like the look of and by picking through the scant in-game choices, you eventually get to see nudie pictures of her. People might argue that there is an emotional, deep or interesting relationship being explored within the game, and that's what VN fans are really playing it to see, but even then these relationships are often following a standardised format in which the sex comes eventually (and inevitably). These stories are often corny, with lots of purple prose and boring content. The slice of life nature of most VNs encourage you to look at these from a character driven perspective, but that often results in a lot of tedious drivel and little to drive the plot beyond "let's see if they will get around to having sex". Even in most sliciest of life stories, like Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou), there is usually a driving intrigue, or mystery, or some form of device that keeps the reader wanting to see a resolution (in the case of YKK, you have plant babies, mysterious planes, a fish woman, the bizarre circumstances surrounding the gynoids and their "owners", the reason for Earth's death; all kinds of crap that is going on whilst the protagonists talk about roasting coffee beans.)

Of course, there are exceptions to these. Christina Love games have more than one sentence on screen, tend to involve lots of ways in which the player can direct the conversation/action, the thing driving the plot is usually not just an ambition to have sex, and romance is explored in ways beyond "fucking 15 year olds". I'd love to see more VNs that deviate from the standard, shitty format. Because right now, I can't understand why people would shill out for what I see as awkwardly presented, lazily designed, badly written, immaturely conceived and dubiously tasted Franken-game/books.

maninahat:

Izanagi009:

Shamus Young:
Why is a Bare Breast More Offensive Than a Severed Arm?

This question gets asked a lot. "Why is a bare breast more offensive than a severed arm?" This question has been around in one form or another for decades and is usually presented as a challenge or a demand for explanation regarding the way movies are rated, marketed, and edited.

Read Full Article

Excelelnt artilce but I have one question after it.

You had stated that games are bad as systematizing relationships and conversations. So where does that put Visual Novels like Little Busters, Clannad and other such digital media that revolves around conversations and developing relationships between characters in game? Does this mean that the current model of Visual Novel is the best we have limited by a very poor system?

I'd say visual novels have a very poor system for exploring sexuality. In terms of a game exploring sexuality, visual novels often deprive the gamer outright in terms of interactivity, reducing their input to just an occasional, arbitrary choice as to which room in the school to go to, or what time to get up. It's there so we can't deviate from the pre-arranged love story. If this were an actual book with no interactivity, I wouldn't mind; with that, one can still read a meaningful and interesting story that explores sexuality. But in VNs, there is this awkward format in which I can only read one sentence at a time and have to click to move onto the next (or wait for the next sentence to appear), because 90% of the screen is wasted, taken up by a static picture of a girl who is often not doing anything but standing still and pulling a face.

As a book for exploring sexuality, outside of the formatting issues, VNs are often written from the perspective that sex is a reward for the player. The games are often are marketed on the idea that you pick a girl you like the look of and by picking through the scant in-game choices, you eventually get to see nudie pictures of her. People might argue that there is an emotional, deep or interesting relationship being explored within the game, and that's what VN fans are really playing it to see, but even then these relationships are often following a standardised format in which the sex comes eventually (and inevitably). These stories are often corny, with lots of purple prose and boring content. The slice of life nature of most VNs encourage you to look at these from a character driven perspective, but that often results in a lot of tedious drivel and little to drive the plot beyond "let's see if they will get around to having sex". Even in most sliciest of life stories, like Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou), there is usually a driving intrigue, or mystery, or some form of device that keeps the reader wanting to see a resolution (in the case of YKK, you have plant babies, mysterious planes, a fish woman, the bizarre circumstances surrounding the gynoids and their "owners", the reason for Earth's death; all kinds of crap that is going on whilst the protagonists talk about roasting coffee beans.)

Of course, there are exceptions to these. Christina Love games have more than one sentence on screen, tend to involve lots of ways in which the player can direct the conversation/action, the thing driving the plot is usually not just an ambition to have sex, and romance is explored in ways beyond "fucking 15 year olds". I'd love to see more VNs that deviate from the standard, shitty format. Because right now, I can't understand why people would shill out for what I see as awkwardly presented, lazily designed, badly written, immaturely conceived and dubiously tasted Franken-game/books.

I will admit that most visual novels are basically self-insert fantasies designed around high school drama, tension and problems designed only to appeal to Otaku and NEET but at the same time, there are companies like Key that make works that people seem to really like: Little Busters, Kanon, Clannad. In addition, It is still possible for people to feel something from a standardized format: after all, many stories are simply those retold over and over again.

on that note, what are your opinion on either of the Key visual novels I named above, Katawa Shoujo, Grisaia No Kaijutsu, and School Days (School Days is the odd man out since it's a deconstruction of harem VNs)

Izanagi009:

maninahat:

Izanagi009:

Excelelnt artilce but I have one question after it.

You had stated that games are bad as systematizing relationships and conversations. So where does that put Visual Novels like Little Busters, Clannad and other such digital media that revolves around conversations and developing relationships between characters in game? Does this mean that the current model of Visual Novel is the best we have limited by a very poor system?

I'd say visual novels have a very poor system for exploring sexuality. In terms of a game exploring sexuality, visual novels often deprive the gamer outright in terms of interactivity, reducing their input to just an occasional, arbitrary choice as to which room in the school to go to, or what time to get up. It's there so we can't deviate from the pre-arranged love story. If this were an actual book with no interactivity, I wouldn't mind; with that, one can still read a meaningful and interesting story that explores sexuality. But in VNs, there is this awkward format in which I can only read one sentence at a time and have to click to move onto the next (or wait for the next sentence to appear), because 90% of the screen is wasted, taken up by a static picture of a girl who is often not doing anything but standing still and pulling a face.

As a book for exploring sexuality, outside of the formatting issues, VNs are often written from the perspective that sex is a reward for the player. The games are often are marketed on the idea that you pick a girl you like the look of and by picking through the scant in-game choices, you eventually get to see nudie pictures of her. People might argue that there is an emotional, deep or interesting relationship being explored within the game, and that's what VN fans are really playing it to see, but even then these relationships are often following a standardised format in which the sex comes eventually (and inevitably). These stories are often corny, with lots of purple prose and boring content. The slice of life nature of most VNs encourage you to look at these from a character driven perspective, but that often results in a lot of tedious drivel and little to drive the plot beyond "let's see if they will get around to having sex". Even in most sliciest of life stories, like Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou), there is usually a driving intrigue, or mystery, or some form of device that keeps the reader wanting to see a resolution (in the case of YKK, you have plant babies, mysterious planes, a fish woman, the bizarre circumstances surrounding the gynoids and their "owners", the reason for Earth's death; all kinds of crap that is going on whilst the protagonists talk about roasting coffee beans.)

Of course, there are exceptions to these. Christina Love games have more than one sentence on screen, tend to involve lots of ways in which the player can direct the conversation/action, the thing driving the plot is usually not just an ambition to have sex, and romance is explored in ways beyond "fucking 15 year olds". I'd love to see more VNs that deviate from the standard, shitty format. Because right now, I can't understand why people would shill out for what I see as awkwardly presented, lazily designed, badly written, immaturely conceived and dubiously tasted Franken-game/books.

I will admit that most visual novels are basically self-insert fantasies designed around high school drama, tension and problems designed only to appeal to Otaku and NEET but at the same time, there are companies like Key that make works that people seem to really like: Little Busters, Kanon, Clannad. In addition, It is still possible for people to feel something from a standardized format: after all, many stories are simply those retold over and over again.

on that note, what are your opinion on either of the Key visual novels I named above, Katawa Shoujo, Grisaia No Kaijutsu, and School Days (School Days is the odd man out since it's a deconstruction of harem VNs)

Of those three you listed, I've only played/read Katawa Shoujo. I think it had better ideas than most in the same kind of setting, but over all I felt the quality of writing was inconsistent, and I didn't like the pacing. Basically the complaint I made above about how the more slice of life stories still need something to pull the plot along. Perhaps if the heart condition was much more of a ticking time bomb in the path I took (Shizune's), or if there was some other looming threat, it might have made the arduous discussions about the council easier to read through.

Why is rape more controversial than murder? The vocal nature of the complainant.

Isn't this mostly an American thing? Here in Scandinavia nudity isn't that big a deal, just seems like Americans tend to be a bit more prudish when it comes to the human body, while extreme violence is a-ok.

Because American Culture is extremely prudish when it comes to sex.

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