Four Ways The Legend of Korra Respected Its Younger Viewers

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Four Ways The Legend of Korra Respected Its Younger Viewers

The Legend of Korra wasn't so much subversive as it was respectful of its younger viewers.

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I was pleasantly surprised by how they handled those different subjects. Let's hope the creators get another shot at a show together.

I really feel the first four but the fifth is a little undeserved. The Korra/Asami relationship is a nice 5 minutes at the end of the last season, but they never really did much more than that with queer representation.

While I really enjoyed it, P'Li's* death was kinda messed up (armor enclosing the detonation around her head). I liked that they tackled these subjects, without making it 'dark'.

*aka Combustion Woman

castlewise:
I really feel the first four but the fifth is a little undeserved. The Korra/Asami relationship is a nice 5 minutes at the end of the last season, but they never really did much more than that with queer representation.

Someone needs to visit deviantart...

I will put aside my huge problems with Korra aside and say it is nice to have these things in a kids show. If only they could've know there would've been four seasons, and made the writing and characterizations better, then all of this would've been cherries on the cake.

Only thing I wonder is if kids would pick up on the Korrasami part at the end. I understood it, which it was implied with as much subtlety as a baby crying on an airplane, but would younger kids get the implication?

Hopefully we can have more of this type of stuff in children's shows, along with better writing and stories.

I was always rooting for Korra when it tried to tell more nuanced, adult stories, and it DID make progress. However, in my view it never quite nailed it. It presented lots of complex dilemmas, but when it came to resolving them, it all became a little too neat and simplistic again, I guess because at heart, it was still a kid's show.

I enjoyed the show very much, and I laud them for trying, but personally they never quite stuck the landing for me.

Super Cyborg:
I will put aside my huge problems with Korra aside and say it is nice to have these things in a kids show. If only they could've know there would've been four seasons, and made the writing and characterizations better, then all of this would've been cherries on the cake.

Only thing I wonder is if kids would pick up on the Korrasami part at the end. I understood it, which it was implied with as much subtlety as a baby crying on an airplane, but would younger kids get the implication?

Hopefully we can have more of this type of stuff in children's shows, along with better writing and stories.

If you mean 'Is an 8 year old going to guess that these two are about 5 seconds away from making out, in that last scene?' then probably not. However, I would argue that that's not necessarily the point. 8 year old's aren't really burdened with a detailed understanding of romantic relationship in general, but just seeing two women on TV holding hands, and looking at each-other in that way, and for the context of that image to be presented as in no way 'weird', is a powerful symbol that could take root and have an effect on how they view those kinds of things later on, when they do understand them better.

NinjaDeathSlap:
It presented lots of complex dilemmas, but when it came to resolving them, it all became a little too neat and simplistic again

Except for you know the dethroning of the tyrannical Earth Queen leading to a power vacuum that propelled the book 4 villain into power, anarchy lead to tyranny

I think the main one people felt was resolved too neatly was the Equalist revolution, but this is actually what happened in the west in real life, a lot of people during the 19th and early 20th century thought Western Europe's lower class would overthrow their governments in violent revolutions, and while some did happen, they were quickly beaten down and then things sort of just resolved themselves as small concessions were made and the lives of the poor in the west started to improve

Having finished the show super recently, I have to say I really liked it. In fact I liked it so much that I also looked at the Tv Tropes page (as I usually do when I finish any piece of media I end up liking). Also I'm super sad now, because the show is over, and there won't be any new adventures.

SNCommand:

NinjaDeathSlap:
It presented lots of complex dilemmas, but when it came to resolving them, it all became a little too neat and simplistic again

Except for you know the dethroning of the tyrannical Earth Queen leading to a power vacuum that propelled the book 4 villain into power, anarchy lead to tyranny

But you can be pretty sure that if it had been the Avatar toppling the Earth Queen, rather than another villain, things would've turned out alright. In any case, One Zaheer is defeated, his ideology is all gone, and the Red Lotus are never brought up again, despite being shown to be a bigger movement than just him and his inner circle. The show did a good job in presenting a character who really believes in his cause, and is inspirational in that, but in terms of showing people what anarchy actually is and how it effects people versus the various alternatives? Very little. About 10 minutes of looting in Ba Sing Se, and then nothing until Kuvira unites the nation again 3 years later, where we're just told that she's a tryant now, with no in depth exploration of how she rose to power and how that process might have changed her.

It was the same in Book 1. The word 'Equality' was tossed around a lot, and it was generally understood that 'Equality' was supposed to be a 'Good Thing', even if Amon was a 'Bad Guy', but it kinda falls flat when the Equalist cause was largely reduced to a dude in the street shouting about bending being evil. Oh, and there was that one scene with the Triads who were using bending to bully a shopkeeper. One scene. Wow. I'm totally on board with the idea that the entire city hates benders and is now rising up behind Amon now... or that as soon as Amon was revealed to be a fraud, everyone just kinda went home.

I don't want to get into a long protracted argument about it, because I did really enjoy Korra, and I liked that it's writing had loftier ambitions for storytelling, I just wish it had gone just that extra step further much of the time, to be more thoughtful and less derivative.

NinjaDeathSlap:

SNCommand:

NinjaDeathSlap:
It presented lots of complex dilemmas, but when it came to resolving them, it all became a little too neat and simplistic again

Except for you know the dethroning of the tyrannical Earth Queen leading to a power vacuum that propelled the book 4 villain into power, anarchy lead to tyranny

But you can be pretty sure that if it had been the Avatar toppling the Earth Queen, rather than another villain, things would've turned out alright. In any case, One Zaheer is defeated, his ideology is all gone, and the Red Lotus are never brought up again, despite being shown to be a bigger movement than just him and his inner circle. The show did a good job in presenting a character who really believes in his cause, and is inspirational in that, but in terms of showing people what anarchy actually is and how it effects people versus the various alternatives? Very little. About 10 minutes of looting in Ba Sing Se, and then nothing until Kuvira unites the nation again 3 years later, where we're just told that she's a tryant now, with no in depth exploration of how she rose to power and how that process might have changed her.

It was the same in Book 1. The word 'Equality' was tossed around a lot, and it was generally understood that 'Equality' was supposed to be a 'Good Thing', even if Amon was a 'Bad Guy', but it kinda falls flat when the Equalist cause was largely reduced to a dude in the street shouting about bending being evil. Oh, and there was that one scene with the Triads who were using bending to bully a shopkeeper. One scene. Wow. I'm totally on board with the idea that the entire city hates benders and is now rising up behind Amon now... or that as soon as Amon was revealed to be a fraud, everyone just kinda went home.

I don't want to get into a long protracted argument about it, because I did really enjoy Korra, and I liked that it's writing had loftier ambitions for storytelling, I just wish it had gone just that extra step further much of the time, to be more thoughtful and less derivative.

Well, first off, Zaheer's ideology isn't gone, it's just lost its most powerful believers, that kills a cause, they still say in the end of Book 3 that there's still Red Lotus members out there and they have to be careful, now having the Red Lotus show up again would just be Book 3 all over again, instead they introduce a new villain who overshadows the possible threat of the remaining Red Lotus, and who is elevated to her position because of what the Red Lotus did

And what were they supposed to show of anarchy besides its effects? Zaheer explained his beliefs fairly well when he met Korra in the spirit world, and we both saw the violent aftermath of it after the Earth Queen was dethrones and then the stabilization afterwards, not much else to show really

As for Kuvira we are given a look on how she changed, during the flashback we see Kuvira beg to help the people and bring peace back, but she is denied, she then starts to bend the rules, goes behind the back of her surrogate mother, as she nears reuniting the Earth Kingdom she's in too deep in a world of necessary evils and hard truths, she then presents the same ideology taught to her by her surrogate mother and uses it as justification for taking charge of the Earth Kingdom, she won't have anymore kings when she believes she can rule better

As for the equalists I explained how it stays true to historical parallels, the communist revolution in Germany ended with it being beat down, but then the previous rulers abdicated and a new democratic government was instituted, just as what happened to the equalists, the Avatar and the United Forces crush the equalists, then the Council is removed from power and they elect a President

NinjaDeathSlap:

It was the same in Book 1. The word 'Equality' was tossed around a lot, and it was generally understood that 'Equality' was supposed to be a 'Good Thing', even if Amon was a 'Bad Guy', but it kinda falls flat when the Equalist cause was largely reduced to a dude in the street shouting about bending being evil. Oh, and there was that one scene with the Triads who were using bending to bully a shopkeeper. One scene. Wow. I'm totally on board with the idea that the entire city hates benders and is now rising up behind Amon now... or that as soon as Amon was revealed to be a fraud, everyone just kinda went home.

In this regard I have to give credit to the Gonzo Podcast crew for noticing a huge glaring plot-hole in Amon's plans, namely that he doesn't really take away the bending of his victims, he just shuts off their ability to use them.

This means that even if he managed to un-bend every bender on the planet, their children would still inherit the ability! This means that the only way "equality" could be upheld is if Amon employed a small army of expert blood-benders to keep shutting off the bending of every newborn all around the world (meaning he needs benders to eradicate bending, but he can't eradicate benders because he needs them to eradicate bending).

In other words, his entire plan is completely and 100% infeasible and no one calls him out on it instead focusing on the mostly irrelevant "hypocrisy" and "morality" angles. Honestly, this fridge brilliance moment alone pretty much destroyed the image of Amon in my mind.

Whoah boy, where do I start, let's go one by one:
1. Death: "remember kids, bad guys take care of themselves, so bad guys will in the end kill themselves without need for the protagonist to filthy their hands, excepty, killing your uncle, that should not make you feel bad whatsoever if he was evil.

2. Sympathetic Villains: Yeah remember those 4 bad guys in season 3 who.... the fire gal and wind guy love each over, and the earth guy is one time sarcastic... and that water girl who was.... there... totally sympathetic despite probably causing the deaths of millions!

3. Depression: "remember kids, if you have a disability, rather than live with it you can find a magic cameo who will help you cure of your disability, because disabilities are for losers! Don't feel bad about your fate, you'll be fine in 3 episodes!".

4. Queer Representation: "remember kids, if you whine bad enough of what should be true, eventually the creative team will violate series canon to make it true! No need to justify it, there will be enough people screaming 'GENIUS' and 'MISOGYNIST' to anyone daring question it. Just as long as it's no MALE GAYS, those ones are icky".

All in all, I actually regret watching Korra, taking an interesting premise and wasting it while defiling it's canon.

Korra dealt with a lot of heavy topics, more so then Aang, but over all the latter series was more solid... even if Zhurrick had me gushing liquid man pride.

inu-kun:
Whoah boy, where do I start, let's go one by one:

1. Death: "remember kids, bad guys take care of themselves, so bad guys will in the end kill themselves without need for the protagonist to filthy their hands, excepty, killing your uncle, that should not make you feel bad whatsoever if he was evil.

2. Sympathetic Villains: Yeah remember those 4 bad guys in season 3 who.... the fire gal and wind guy love each over, and the earth guy is one time sarcastic... and that water girl who was.... there... totally sympathetic despite probably causing the deaths of millions!

3. Depression: "remember kids, if you have a disability, rather than live with it you can find a magic cameo who will help you cure of your disability, because disabilities are for losers! Don't feel bad about your fate, you'll be fine in 3 episodes!".

4. Queer Representation: "remember kids, if you whine bad enough of what should be true, eventually the creative team will violate series canon to make it true! No need to justify it, there will be enough people screaming 'GENIUS' and 'MISOGYNIST' to anyone daring question it. Just as long as it's no MALE GAYS, those ones are icky".

All in all, I actually regret watching Korra, taking an interesting premise and wasting it while defiling it's canon.

You know, I can sort of agree with the first three, the conclusions of Korra did feel very clear cut which wasn't completely appropriate given the topics they choose to address but as for the last one, personally, I'm willing to cut them a bit of slack. Yes, it would have been nice for them to maybe have a few more scenes with just Korra and Asami 'bonding', but the show was already in trouble with the network as it was. A 'is gay okay' debate was the last thing the show needed. I do hope that one day real soon a family show bites the bullet and openly presents a gay relationship but maybe there is no high road to take in this situation. After all, if they were just giving in to tumblr I'm fairly sure BolinXEsker would have been a thing.

inu-kun:
Whoah boy, where do I start, let's go one by one:

Yes, let's go one by one and reduce everything to a single line of your misrepresentation gripes.

1. Death: "remember kids, bad guys take care of themselves, so bad guys will in the end kill themselves without need for the protagonist to filthy their hands, excepty, killing your uncle, that should not make you feel bad whatsoever if he was evil.

So what, because the show didn't have Korra murdering everyone we should just ignore all the times death showed up? Murder suicides, heads exploding, a woman suffocating, a main character electrocuting a woman to death, all don't count because Korra didn't do it herself! Oh, and because she doesn't feel all that bad about killing her uncle who she barely knew and who had done nothing but try and harm her family, her people, and try and pretty much kill everyone, they don't take death seriously!

2. Sympathetic Villains: Yeah remember those 4 bad guys in season 3 who.... the fire gal and wind guy love each over, and the earth guy is one time sarcastic... and that water girl who was.... there... totally sympathetic despite probably causing the deaths of millions!

Yeah, let's ignore the two victims of child abuse from season 1. And pretend that the four people from season 3 didn't have any characterization or understandable motivations, and pretend that they somehow killed a million people... somehow.

3. Depression: "remember kids, if you have a disability, rather than live with it you can find a magic cameo who will help you cure of your disability, because disabilities are for losers! Don't feel bad about your fate, you'll be fine in 3 episodes!".

So, because Korra got help for her trauma after three years of dealing with it, the show didn't address trauma or depression? Apparently recovering from trauma is some horrible offense that must never in your world.

4. Queer Representation: "remember kids, if you whine bad enough of what should be true, eventually the creative team will violate series canon to make it true! No need to justify it, there will be enough people screaming 'GENIUS' and 'MISOGYNIST' to anyone daring question it. Just as long as it's no MALE GAYS, those ones are icky".

And how did they violate the series canon to make Korra and Asami form a relationship? Are gay people existing against the "canon" of Avatar now?

All in all, I actually regret watching Korra, taking an interesting premise and wasting it while defiling it's canon.

Yes, inu-kun, speak to us the truth of the canon that only you, in your infinite axe-grinding wisdom and ability to reduce everything that happened to a few lines of misrepresentative nonsense, are able to understand.

LifeCharacter:

inu-kun:
Whoah boy, where do I start, let's go one by one:

Yes, let's go one by one and reduce everything to a single line of your misrepresentation gripes.

1. Death: "remember kids, bad guys take care of themselves, so bad guys will in the end kill themselves without need for the protagonist to filthy their hands, excepty, killing your uncle, that should not make you feel bad whatsoever if he was evil.

So what, because the show didn't have Korra murdering everyone we should just ignore all the times death showed up? Murder suicides, heads exploding, a woman suffocating, a main character electrocuting a woman to death, all don't count because Korra didn't do it herself! Oh, and because she doesn't feel all that bad about killing her uncle who she barely knew and who had done nothing but try and harm her family, her people, and try and pretty much kill everyone, they don't take death seriously!

2. Sympathetic Villains: Yeah remember those 4 bad guys in season 3 who.... the fire gal and wind guy love each over, and the earth guy is one time sarcastic... and that water girl who was.... there... totally sympathetic despite probably causing the deaths of millions!

Yeah, let's ignore the two victims of child abuse from season 1. And pretend that the four people from season 3 didn't have any characterization or understandable motivations, and pretend that they somehow killed a million people... somehow.

3. Depression: "remember kids, if you have a disability, rather than live with it you can find a magic cameo who will help you cure of your disability, because disabilities are for losers! Don't feel bad about your fate, you'll be fine in 3 episodes!".

So, because Korra got help for her trauma after three years of dealing with it, the show didn't address trauma or depression? Apparently recovering from trauma is some horrible offense that must never in your world.

4. Queer Representation: "remember kids, if you whine bad enough of what should be true, eventually the creative team will violate series canon to make it true! No need to justify it, there will be enough people screaming 'GENIUS' and 'MISOGYNIST' to anyone daring question it. Just as long as it's no MALE GAYS, those ones are icky".

And how did they violate the series canon to make Korra and Asami form a relationship? Are gay people existing against the "canon" of Avatar now?

All in all, I actually regret watching Korra, taking an interesting premise and wasting it while defiling it's canon.

Yes, inu-kun, speak to us the truth of the canon that only you, in your infinite axe-grinding wisdom and ability to reduce everything that happened to a few lines of misrepresentative nonsense, are able to understand.

I hate the seperating topics, makes each point harder to refute, let's start:
1. Only the bad guys die, that's not teaching children about death, if anything that's teaching children that only bad people die early and only good people live to an old age. Not a snigle good guy dies, how does it teaches children about dealing with death? It just says that death exist and only as karmic punishment. And killing a family member SHOULD be a big deal, it was worse for Aang for killing a tyrant.

2. Well, yeah, only the first season. But afterwards none of the villains are deep, we don't get any characterization for any of them beyond a few lines or any backstory, that's just lazy. And I call the 'Endor holocaust', I can't believe that a nation the size of china dissolves without at least couple of millions dying from violence or famine, heck we see their capital burning, that's a few thousands deaths right there.

3. Recovering from disability is bad writing, especially for a children's show, yes we want to see her recover but that's bad moral that if you try hard enough you'll get magically better. Show us her coping with it finding way to fight even while weakened, have her be the badass in the wheelchair.

4. No, but they were both straight by the end of the 2nd season and they were adult enough to decide their sexuality. They were slightly friendly in the start of the 3rd season and now suddently they are both gay? I dropped the show after the 4th episode but unless those 3 years Asami mailed Korra erotic literature how they are suddently in love?

GabeZhul:

NinjaDeathSlap:

It was the same in Book 1. The word 'Equality' was tossed around a lot, and it was generally understood that 'Equality' was supposed to be a 'Good Thing', even if Amon was a 'Bad Guy', but it kinda falls flat when the Equalist cause was largely reduced to a dude in the street shouting about bending being evil. Oh, and there was that one scene with the Triads who were using bending to bully a shopkeeper. One scene. Wow. I'm totally on board with the idea that the entire city hates benders and is now rising up behind Amon now... or that as soon as Amon was revealed to be a fraud, everyone just kinda went home.

In this regard I have to give credit to the Gonzo Podcast crew for noticing a huge glaring plot-hole in Amon's plans, namely that he doesn't really take away the bending of his victims, he just shuts off their ability to use them.

This means that even if he managed to un-bend every bender on the planet, their children would still inherit the ability! This means that the only way "equality" could be upheld is if Amon employed a small army of expert blood-benders to keep shutting off the bending of every newborn all around the world (meaning he needs benders to eradicate bending, but he can't eradicate benders because he needs them to eradicate bending).

In other words, his entire plan is completely and 100% infeasible and no one calls him out on it instead focusing on the mostly irrelevant "hypocrisy" and "morality" angles. Honestly, this fridge brilliance moment alone pretty much destroyed the image of Amon in my mind.

That's not the only flaw in the Equalist's plans. The 'Revelation' nicely pointed out the flaw in Equalist's veneration of electrical technology, in that the power plant's ran on lighting bending. Go a little further and most of the technology and infrastructure of all the nations are dependent on bending; the water tribes very ability to have civilizations are dependent on bending.

The very fact their plan was dependent on one individual removing the bending for every bender in the world is in itself ridiculous.

Equalist's were meant to be an understandable group, in that one can understand resenting benders for have greater opportunities do to what they can do, or for being victims of the triads; but they (and Amon) were never meant to be reasonable.

Up until Tarlocks reactionary measures, the validity of their complaints were on par with your average conspiracy theorist.

inu-kun:
Whoah boy, where do I start, let's go one by one:
1. Death: "remember kids, bad guys take care of themselves, so bad guys will in the end kill themselves without need for the protagonist to filthy their hands, excepty, killing your uncle, that should not make you feel bad whatsoever if he was evil.

2. Sympathetic Villains: Yeah remember those 4 bad guys in season 3 who.... the fire gal and wind guy love each over, and the earth guy is one time sarcastic... and that water girl who was.... there... totally sympathetic despite probably causing the deaths of millions!

3. Depression: "remember kids, if you have a disability, rather than live with it you can find a magic cameo who will help you cure of your disability, because disabilities are for losers! Don't feel bad about your fate, you'll be fine in 3 episodes!".

4. Queer Representation: "remember kids, if you whine bad enough of what should be true, eventually the creative team will violate series canon to make it true! No need to justify it, there will be enough people screaming 'GENIUS' and 'MISOGYNIST' to anyone daring question it. Just as long as it's no MALE GAYS, those ones are icky".

All in all, I actually regret watching Korra, taking an interesting premise and wasting it while defiling it's canon.

1.you do know that Aang kill someone did not feel guilty right (that guy that kill the fish) and does death only count if the protagonist kills? good news Bruce Wayne your parents are not dead.

2. yes no villain had a back story for child abuse or wanted to change a system of abuse that between the rich and poor.

3. Korra was like a car accident victim badly injure but not to the point of disability you need to remember that being in a wheelchair after a fight she went through does not mean that she was disability. Also it took three years for her to healed. (with help from someone with a disability that they are find with)

4.so there are no gay people in the Avatar world yes Korra and Asami are the first that we know of but this is because the last airbender could not show gay people. Korra and Asami relationship was done the best way they could show you have to remember that the America has it problems with showing gay people. ( one million moms and the American Family Association being some of them)

5.yes who knows canon more some one who saw it or the creators of it.

I still say The Legend of Korra was a pretty big disappointment for me. The only season I can honestly say was for the most part 'good' was Season 3 and even then it suffered from some problems and came nowhere near the highs of TLA. It only goes to show that even if a show has some rather noticeable flaws if you end it with lesbians it will get widespread praise and critical acclaim. It makes you think just how different the reaction would of been if it had been Mako instead of Asami in that final scene.

castlewise:
I really feel the first four but the fifth is a little undeserved. The Korra/Asami relationship is a nice 5 minutes at the end of the last season, but they never really did much more than that with queer representation.

But it DID make it in there. Remember what kind of audience they are speaking to, and what hoops they probably have to jump through to get it accepted by the management. There were subtle hints, like Korra seemingly being more happy to see Asami than anyone else.

Also, while I dont think the whole story comes off as good as the Aang one, this largely has to do with the fact that Airbender had several seasons building the whole plot, taking a journey and getting to know the characters.

Korra was a bit more....in pieces. The story did nonetheless move forward and I applaud ANY creator willing to take children seriously as an audience. Huge props to the creators for what they have done, both with this and Airbender. I'll be sure to follow them in the future :)

I shipped Mako and Korra so hard that in the last 5 minutes i screamed a lot. Don't get me wrong here. I can actually see how it came to it, Korra only writing letters to Asami, only Asami helping Korra with her PTSD/depression and other stuff. And to all people saying Korra is lesbian now, no she is not she is bisexual, since she did date Mako in season 1 and 2. But yea. I shipped those two so hard I screamed real hard.

Mike Hoffman:
Four Ways The Legend of Korra Respected Its Younger Viewers

castlewise:
I really feel the first four but the fifth is a little undeserved.

image
I guess so, but what is the fifth one? Someone please explain.

inu-kun:
1. Only the bad guys die, that's not teaching children about death, if anything that's teaching children that only bad people die early and only good people live to an old age. Not a snigle good guy dies, how does it teaches children about dealing with death? It just says that death exist and only as karmic punishment. And killing a family member SHOULD be a big deal, it was worse for Aang for killing a tyrant.

Well, where are all the dying people in other children's cartoons? One's where the people who die have been humanized and characterized and then had their head explode, or had their death shown with enough detail that while they're being suffocated you get to watch their eyes go bloodshot? Considering the idea is that "people are actually and explicitly dying" the fact that they're villains is irrelevant.

And why should killing a family member you barely know and who has only done evil things and plans to do even more be a big deal for someone? They have very little actual relationship so it's not like her dear old dad went evil. The fact that Aang angsted about having to go against his pacifism for the sake of saving the world from a psychopath also doesn't really have much baring because Korra happens to not be Aang. Korra doesn't have some big moral problem about killing another person, so why would she angst about it?

2. Well, yeah, only the first season. But afterwards none of the villains are deep, we don't get any characterization for any of them beyond a few lines or any backstory, that's just lazy. And I call the 'Endor holocaust', I can't believe that a nation the size of china dissolves without at least couple of millions dying from violence or famine, heck we see their capital burning, that's a few thousands deaths right there.

Oh, so you just decided to leave out the first season for the sake of your whining? Got it. And I'm pretty sure each and every villain barring season 2 are deeper than those found on most children's shows, even The Last Airbender with its angry admiral, obstructionist secret police, sociopathic princess, and power mad Phoenix King.

3. Recovering from disability is bad writing, especially for a children's show, yes we want to see her recover but that's bad moral that if you try hard enough you'll get magically better. Show us her coping with it finding way to fight even while weakened, have her be the badass in the wheelchair.

Well the problem is that she wasn't suffering from a disability, she was suffering from trauma. They decided to go with showing a realistic depiction of physical therapy and have Korra deal with post-traumatic stress disorder rather than be disabled. And, when going through physical therapy, I feel like "you have to try painfully hard to maybe be able to take one extra step" is far from magically getting better.

4. No, but they were both straight by the end of the 2nd season and they were adult enough to decide their sexuality. They were slightly friendly in the start of the 3rd season and now suddently they are both gay? I dropped the show after the 4th episode but unless those 3 years Asami mailed Korra erotic literature how they are suddently in love?

Umm, no, they were both women who'd dated a man by the end of the 2nd season. Nothing ever said they weren't bisexual or even homosexual at that point because dating a man does not somehow discount everything but heterosexuality. And, considering that the end of the series was the start of their relationship, and that friends develop feelings for each other all the goddamned time, that you have such a problem with this says much more about you than the writing. Also, good job turning "I have a problem with two women developing feelings for each other when they didn't have feelings for each other at some arbitrary point in the past" into "they're violating the canon!"

Nods Respectfully Towards You:
I still say The Legend of Korra was a pretty big disappointment for me. The only season I can honestly say was for the most part 'good' was Season 3 and even then it suffered from some problems and came nowhere near the highs of TLA. It only goes to show that even if a show has some rather noticeable flaws if you end it with lesbians it will get widespread praise and critical acclaim. It makes you think just how different the reaction would of been if it had been Mako instead of Asami in that final scene.

And this post only goes to show that if you happen to like a show that had bisexuals in it, people who didn't like the show will accuse you of only liking it because it had bisexuals in it.

Sympathetic Villain? Here's a Summary:
Amon; was the best one, as an intimidating force of nature. The only one that really accomplish anything despite how short it lasted.
Tarrlok; was the first self sabotaging villain. And that's all I have to say.
Unalaq; aka Tarrlok 2.0, now with more self sabotage.
Varrick; he's a corporate bad guy, that's it despite the fact that there was a much more interesting direction they could have used.
Zaheer; boring villain, we get told things about him, but we never gets to see them.
The 3 others: Same as Zaheer.
Kuvira; is a dictator, that's it. The only reason anyone had any sympathy for her was because the guy she tried to replace was stupid.

LifeCharacter:

Nods Respectfully Towards You:
I still say The Legend of Korra was a pretty big disappointment for me. The only season I can honestly say was for the most part 'good' was Season 3 and even then it suffered from some problems and came nowhere near the highs of TLA. It only goes to show that even if a show has some rather noticeable flaws if you end it with lesbians it will get widespread praise and critical acclaim. It makes you think just how different the reaction would of been if it had been Mako instead of Asami in that final scene.

And this post only goes to show that if you happen to like a show that had bisexuals in it, people who didn't like the show will accuse you of only liking it because it had bisexuals in it.

Weird how I didn't see much praise this season before the finale then. Then all of a sudden it's one of the best finales ever despite Season 3 being largely regarded as the better of the four.

Sooo.. I just watched TLA and LoK during christmas, finishing today.. Do we have official confirmation that there 100% won't be another Avatar series after this one?

..'cause, I would probably watch that.

Edguy:
Sooo.. I just watched TLA and LoK during christmas, finishing today.. Do we have official confirmation that there 100% won't be another Avatar series after this one?

..'cause, I would probably watch that.

There are no immediate plans for another Avatar series. The creators have said they intend to move on to other projects before they're even going to consider making another avatar TV series.

There is an ongoing follow up comic to the original series done by dark horse, and it's not unreasonable to hope for a Korra one as well.

LifeCharacter:
Yes, inu-kun, speak to us the truth of the canon that only you, in your infinite axe-grinding wisdom and ability to reduce everything that happened to a few lines of misrepresentative nonsense, are able to understand.

I'm reminded of the folks who were bitching that black people existing in positions of power in Dragon Age broke canon. Because they totally know canon better than the people who have written it[1].

Just waiting until the people bitching about this say "but I'm not homophobic!" No, you're not homophobic, you just have a problem with gay people existing in any format that you're subjected to. Totally not not the teeniest bit homophobic at all.

[1] Okay, the Mass Effect 3 ending is one instance where Bioware dropped the bomb, but there's nothing against canon in it in Dragon Age. People upset are either racists or they had a vision of Dragon Age that was never actually supported with lore, and based in false assumption.

Nods Respectfully Towards You:
Weird how I didn't see much praise this season before the finale then. Then all of a sudden it's one of the best finales ever despite Season 3 being largely regarded as the better of the four.

You mean to tell me that people talk about a season, including praising it, after the season ended? How utterly shocking! Though this ending likely got a bit more attention due to the whole bisexuality on Nickelodeon thing, but I imagine the majority of that attention was spent discussing the ending, not declaring the show completely flawless.

You know where you could find people praising the show before the ending? Places where people reviewed it and rated it positively, like here on the Escapist.

Okay, so I haven't gotten around to Korra yet, but I just watched the original series a few months ago for the first time, and this article states that The Last Airbender didn't have a sympathetic villain and everyone seems to be agreeing with this notion and just debating whether or not Korra's are deeper than that, and they are right that Ozai wasn't sympathetic. But maybe people are forgetting that for a large part of the series Zuko and Iroh are villains and they are incredibly sympathetic and relatable. Sure I wouldn't call them evil, but they ARE working for an evil nation and trying to complete unfinished genocide and kill the world's only hope for personal gain. I could see where someone would argue that they aren't the main villain because Ozai is the one responsible for all the destruction and because they eventually become good, but in a sense those same comments could be made about Darth Vader. While they aren't the greatest evil in the world or Aang's greatest enemy, they get by far the most screen time and have the more direct and personal conflict with Aang.

Even if you want to bar those two on the ground that eventually they become good guys, Azulla is still a bit sympathetic once she goes nuts. Shes still behaving in an evil way, but the fact that the realization that even her own closest friends didn't love her clearly troubled her in a very human way. I think that saying the Last Airbender had unsympathetic villains without considering those characters and looking at Ozai is silly, because Ozai essentially has no personality and was just a force of nature in the background for most of the series.

MarsAtlas:

I'm reminded of the folks who were bitching that black people existing in positions of power in Dragon Age broke canon. Because they totally know canon better than the people who have written it

Well to be fair they might have been subconsciously comparing DA to medieval Europe which probably was - and seems to be portrayed as - very white-centric, with other races being relegated to the bottom rung. [1] Given the western styled feudal setting it's not an entirely unjust comparison (Orlais is portrayed as Imperial France isn't it in DA3? Not played that one yet).

[1] I've no idea how true that is, I've not studied European history. GoT probably doesn't help the image either I guess, since Westeros (the continent) is essentially a 'white dudes only' club

Winthrop:
Okay, so I haven't gotten around to Korra yet, but I just watched the original series a few months ago for the first time, and this article states that The Last Airbender didn't have a sympathetic villain and everyone seems to be agreeing with this notion and just debating whether or not Korra's are deeper than that, and they are right that Ozai wasn't sympathetic. But maybe people are forgetting that for a large part of the series Zuko and Iroh are villains and they are incredibly sympathetic and relatable. Sure I wouldn't call them evil, but they ARE working for an evil nation and trying to complete unfinished genocide and kill the world's only hope for personal gain. I could see where someone would argue that they aren't the main villain because Ozai is the one responsible for all the destruction and because they eventually become good, but in a sense those same comments could be made about Darth Vader. While they aren't the greatest evil in the world or Aang's greatest enemy, they get by far the most screen time and have the more direct and personal conflict with Aang.

Even if you want to bar those two on the ground that eventually they become good guys, Azulla is still a bit sympathetic once she goes nuts. Shes still behaving in an evil way, but the fact that the realization that even her own closest friends didn't love her clearly troubled her in a very human way. I think that saying the Last Airbender had unsympathetic villains without considering those characters and looking at Ozai is silly, because Ozai essentially has no personality and was just a force of nature in the background for most of the series.

Zuko and Iroh are not villains, they are antagonists. A villain is someone the protagonists actively oppose and try to hinder/stop, an antagonist is someone who actively opposes the protagonists and tries to hinder/stop them. Most of the time the two are the same, but not necessarily.

For example, in the ATLA series, Zuko and Iroh are antagonists in Season One and even Two. They try to apprehend Aang (well, technically only Zuko wants to, but that's beside the point) but the protagonists don't try to stop them. Then they turn protagonists in Season Three.

Ozai on the other hand is a villain who tries to remake the world in his image and thus the Avatar and gang actively opposes him from Season One, by collecting information, training and collecting allies. However he is not an antagonist until the last few episodes, since he doesn't oppose the protagonists directly, only by proxy and influence.

Then there is Azula, who starts out as an antagonist that wants to take down the protagonists directly and then becomes a villain by the end of Season Three when Zuko and Katara personally have to oppose her and take her down.

I'm just telling you this because correct usage of this terminology is kind of important when we are talking about fiction. :P

[Edit]: Actually, villainy and protagonism-antagonism work on two separate scales, but I don't have the time to get into that in detail right now. Maybe once I'm home from work...

Shinkicker444:

MarsAtlas:

I'm reminded of the folks who were bitching that black people existing in positions of power in Dragon Age broke canon. Because they totally know canon better than the people who have written it

Well to be fair they might have been subconsciously comparing DA to medieval Europe

They said they were, Bioware writers set them straight, they still clinged to this "no black people" notion. In the face of being absolutely, demonstrably incorrect with no validity to their claim, they still claimed it. Oh, but they're totally not racist, they just don't want black people present because reasons. Totally legitimate reasons, they just can't tell you what reasons because other reasons.

I've no idea how true that is, I've not studied European history.

There were more non-white people than "common knowledge" dictates there were. Nothing comprable to modern day Europe, but not exactly insignificant either.

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