More Needs Than Just One Tool

More Needs Than Just One Tool

We are often presented with many tools in a game to accomplish goals, but what happens when those tools are used for destruction in a game not meant for it?

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Well, look at that.

Congratulations to a very deserving writer! :D

I think this is taking it more than a bit far and just ends up looking very silly.

I absolutely loved that article, and the over the top serious tone mixed with animal crossing... nice.

But the main reason I liked it, its a sentiment that rings true in my self (and no doubt many others here) and I have noticed my computer gaming habits crossing over into my tabletop games where I stop playing the game and start gaming the game subconsciously.

Excellent work.

Captcha: First Contact ... I guess it was.

So, I'm a tool and minecraft is exploitation indoctrination?!?!?!
How dare you...

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Good article! I can't wait tor ead the next one :D

Interesting topic and one I would like to see explored further.

Much of the cause for players not treating game worlds and their inhabitants more like the real thing is because game worlds and their inhabitants rarely react like the real thing.

One of the worst offenders is Skyrim. After saving the world and earning enough titles and wealth to be as renowned as a king, the dragonborn is treated much the same as he was before he learned his first shout. NPCs should at least greet him with the proper respect - or fear. How about some bows of respect or children following their idol through town.

In a game like Animal Crossing, players behave as they do because they can. If NPCs eventually got tired of being picked on and started returning the favor, or worse, telling other NPCs what is happening, players might be encouraged to play nice. Having everyone turn and walk away, or close their doors as you approach is harsh but I think it would feel right at the same time.

Some players will still be jerks but that's just people. In most cases, the more real game worlds and their inhabitants become the more respect they will get from players.

personally, I prefer the squeaky hammer

nothing brings your town into its own personal hell like squeak squeak squeak squeak squeak squeak

Nice job Nuke, really good article and all. Hope to see more work from you and I find this to be a suitable sister piece to your article on Haywire on mechanics and play.

Beffudled Sheep:
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Good article! I can't wait tor ead the next one :D

This too.

Zipzip the Penguin:
I think this is taking it more than a bit far and just ends up looking very silly.

I find think pieces usually fall down this particular rabbit hole. Especially when examining something as vast in scope as a wider culture, it's hard not to look really pedantic about examples. I love gaming culture, but it is quite uncritical about the sort of brusque, goal-first mindset it can bolster sometimes.

But yes, in general, I'm quite silly.

Tatsuki:
... I have noticed my computer gaming habits crossing over into my tabletop games where I stop playing the game and start gaming the game subconsciously.

The metagame gets to us all sometimes. I actually use a lot of speedrunning techniques when I play platformers. I don't mean to, but it's a genre I've spent hundreds upon thousands of hours in over my life, and it starts to become reflex after a while. To the point where sometimes I don't spend the time I should with them.

Jadedvet:
Interesting topic and one I would like to see explored further.

Much of the cause for players not treating game worlds and their inhabitants more like the real thing is because game worlds and their inhabitants rarely react like the real thing.

I've spoken on this topic a few times, it's always a fun exploration for me. There's a lot to explore, in terms of subconscious behavior that games can instill in us. Someone below linked one of my pieces for Haywire Magazine that speaks on the same subject from a slightly different angle, so it might be up your alley if you want to see more stuff on this topic.

Also, I don't disagree that people treat games and individuals differently, but I think there is some overlap in mentalities. Gamers aren't sociopaths, really, but they are predisposed to seeking out and finding faster and easier methods for problems. MMOs are a great example for this, because the difference between a high level guild officer and a crafting and aesthetic enthusiast is indicative of the mentality divide.

The guild officer has high energy, high expectation for his players, tends to use immediate programs like Mumble or Teamspeak, speaks in curt commands and expects more focus and technical skill from his subordinates and peers. A crafter, by comparison, will usually be less expectant of other players and more willing to bend. They both have high passions for their work, but guild officers direct the energy outward. They have expectations for capability and reliability, and they likewise demand up to date skillsets and talents. Crafters will direct their energy inward, spending huge resources and time into research and crafting idealized equipment.

Neither of these play styles are wrong or bad, but there is a clear distinction between calling a player's cell phone to make certain they'll show up for an evening's scheduled raid and exploiting a glitch in a mining system in order to insure higher quality materials or bargaining harder for better quantities. In gaming culture, the latter has fewer "victims" than the former, but the former tends to be more highly regarded, and generally seen as the more "hardcore" (or "better") gamer.

So yeah, there is something there, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. It's just an aspect of the competitive, solution-forward nature of competitive and hardcore gamers.

Skatologist:
Nice job Nuke, really good article and all. Hope to see more work from you and I find this to be a suitable sister piece to Game. Play?

Heh, they are rather similar, aren't they? Two different results of the same kind of mindset, applied both internally and externally.

 

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