Everything You Need to Know About Mad Max

Everything You Need to Know About Mad Max

Whether you've seen them all and just can't remember specific important details, or you are a complete newbie to the franchise, we've got you covered with the ultimate guide to Mad Max.

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Judging from the Rotten Tomatoes score and pre-release reviews, Fury Road might actually live up to the hype.

You forgot to point out how Fury Road is a piece of American culture turned feminist propaganda piece that'll ruin all future action flicks by turning them into think pieces or some such.

'Seriously'

I think I will be giving Circe de Mad Max a miss.

Im 50 years old next year and Im gonna show my age for a change. Mad Max 1 was a gritty, well conceived action/suspense drama that was ahead of its time in many ways. Its an excellent movie that still holds up well today, in fact its even more believable and living in Australia, the places it was filmed look just like Miller tried to portray them back then. His future has been all but realised.

Circe de Mad Max however builds on the utter nonsense of Thunderdome. A future where the last few drop of fuel are blown out the end of a flaming guitar by a guy in assless chaps. Its so incoherent as to be comedic. Its a future that will never be realised unless there happens to be an excess of oil, hockey masks and makeup after the apocalypse.

Damn shame really.

The chronology of the Mad Max trilogy always confused me. Going by this, all three are all set relatively short after each other. Yet, especially in Beyond Thunderdome, we're presented with a world in which knowledge of 'the Old World' is treated as a near-mystical legend.

This can also be seen in Road Warrior, I never ever could picture that as a movie that apparently takes place only recently after our world fell apart. But it's the clearest in Beyond Thunderdome. Hence why I'd say that Road Warrior is more like a 'remake' of the first Mad Max, set in the extravagant world the director might've envisioned at first but didn't have the budget to actually realize.

Razorback0z:

Circe de Mad Max however builds on the utter nonsense of Thunderdome. A future where the last few drop of fuel are blown out the end of a flaming guitar by a guy in assless chaps. Its so incoherent as to be comedic. Its a future that will never be realised unless there happens to be an excess of oil, hockey masks and makeup after the apocalypse.

It's funny because that's exactly why I'm excited for it; crazy creativity. It seems, in a way, very daring (in an economical sense), very over-the-top and, indeed, very damn stupid. Where do you see that these days? Grim action-suspense films are nearly a dime-a-dozen these days, which indeed is why the first Mad Max is so far ahead of its time perhaps, it heralded many tropes that these days are trampled flat.

Hence why I'm actually happy to see this type of movie come out. These days we could actually use the Beyond Thunderdome style. But then, y'know, actually executed well.

Cowabungaa:
The chronology of the Mad Max trilogy always confused me. Going by this, all three are all set relatively short after each other. Yet, especially in Beyond Thunderdome, we're presented with a world in which knowledge of 'the Old World' is treated as a near-mystical legend.

This can also be seen in Road Warrior, I never ever could picture that as a movie that apparently takes place only recently after our world fell apart. But it's the clearest in Beyond Thunderdome. Hence why I'd say that Road Warrior is more like a 'remake' of the first Mad Max, set in the extravagant world the director might've envisioned at first but didn't have the budget to actually realize.

Razorback0z:

Circe de Mad Max however builds on the utter nonsense of Thunderdome. A future where the last few drop of fuel are blown out the end of a flaming guitar by a guy in assless chaps. Its so incoherent as to be comedic. Its a future that will never be realised unless there happens to be an excess of oil, hockey masks and makeup after the apocalypse.

It's funny because that's exactly why I'm excited for it; crazy creativity. It seems, in a way, very daring (in an economical sense), very over-the-top and, indeed, very damn stupid. Where do you see that these days? Grim action-suspense films are nearly a dime-a-dozen these days, which indeed is why the first Mad Max is so far ahead of its time perhaps, it heralded many tropes that these days are trampled flat.

Hence why I'm actually happy to see this type of movie come out. These days we could actually use the Beyond Thunderdome style. But then, y'know, actually executed well.

Totally get what your saying and I think if it wasn't for the fact that most movies seem to go for the "stunt porn" angle that I don't get excited by it. Of course your right that very few do it well. But Id rather see stunt porn in an environment I didn't care so much about.

Seeing MM1 as a teenager was a little more life affecting than it probably should have been from a mental health perspective lol. I had just got my first road bike and my criminal record was developing nicely. So I felt kind of part of "the times". When it degenerated into the kind of circus that was MM2, it lost me and I have never made it back. Thunderdome was un-watchable, I actually thought it was supposed to be taken as a send up at first then I realised it wasn't.

So for those that enjoy MM3, Im pleased for you. I wish it was me.

Razorback0z:

Totally get what your saying and I think if it wasn't for the fact that most movies seem to go for the "stunt porn" angle that I don't get excited by it. Of course your right that very few do it well. But Id rather see stunt porn in an environment I didn't care so much about.

Well, that's the thing; do they? Are there that many movies that dare to make a movie with a car chase that's over half an hour long, teeming with live stunt work and practical effects? Maybe the last couple of Fast&Furious movies have been a little like it, but I'd argue that even someone like Michael Bay doesn't truly dare to actually, properly focus on the action itself as something in itself.

And that's what makes me so pumped about the new Mad Max; this is finally a movie that, seems to and hopefully, dares to let the action and stunts take the center stage. In that, I think and hope, it is daring. Whether it really is I'll see tomorrow.

But I get where you're coming from. It's sometimes difficult to detach yourself from things like that and look at it from a fresh perspective. Especially when a movie had such an impact way back when.

I never noticed it before, but Borderlands borrows a lot from Mad Max. I should have noticed the similarities as I am a big fan of both, but for some reason I didn't catch it until the trailers for Fury Road. It was the villains of the new movie. They really seem more than ever like Borderlands' bandits, i.e, so wildly, suicidally bat-nuts insane that they dress like a leather sex dungeon under a Hot Topic and rave in ecstasy about mayhem and death. In other words, a lot of fun.

I actually liked MM3 the most.

It feels like they were going into almost a sci-fi direction or something.

You were giving those plots a lot more credit than they deserve. Also Thunderdome is much more watchable than MM1.

Tanis:
I actually liked MM3 the most.

It feels like they were going into almost a sci-fi direction or something.

I think this is part of the issue with how these films are received. MM1 was essentially a psychological thriller about a man's descent into madness and ultimate surrender to his animalistic side - a policeman who becomes a brutal murderer and drifter by the end. MM2 was, as the article notes, actually a western. And MM3 was a post-apocalyptic almost sci-fi film with more of a focus on society and politics (and, yes, ass-less chaps). It's not that any of the three films is necessarily worse than the others, it's just that despite having similar visual design and settings, they're actually in three entirely different genres. People who liked one of them won't necessarily like the others because underneath all the spikes and leather they're not actually the same kind of film.

I never found MM1 to be all that great. Yes it had its moments but it was sownright boring for stretches that seemed to go on forever. What I do appreciate about MM1 is that it set the stage in a semi-realistic fashion for MM2 and MM3 to build off of, to show how society changes as things get worse and worse. I love Road Warrior, it's one of my very favorite action movies. Fury Road looks fantastic, even if a few things in the trailer give he pause. Hope it lives up to the hype!

soren7550:
You forgot to point out how Fury Road is a piece of American culture turned feminist propaganda piece that'll ruin all future action flicks by turning them into think pieces or some such.

'Seriously'

Having read the actual piece on RoK (and to be honest, the article you linked to is a sad hatchet job) the original writer also brings up the problem of the movie being named after a particular character that ends up being pushed into the background by somebody else (who happens to be a woman). It's possible that there isn't an underlying agenda in doing so, but it certainly sounds fishy.

Gender politics aside, if you go to see a movie called 'Mad Max', you expect the titular character to be A) the hero or B) the most important villain - otherwise, why name the movie after them? Isn't that character supposed to be the focus of the story? Seems a bit disingenuous to sell the movie to the public on a character, then sideline said character most of the time.

It's The Mary Sue, an intelligently written non-conspiracist piece on Prison Planet is about as likely as a good article from there. As for MM:FR, I'll reserve judgement till I actually see it, but if it's just Doomsday:Charlize Theron version that's piggybacking the MM name I shall be quite vexed.

ravenshrike:
It's The Mary Sue, an intelligently written non-conspiracist piece on Prison Planet is about as likely as a good article from there. As for MM:FR, I'll reserve judgement till I actually see it, but if it's just Doomsday:Charlize Theron version that's piggybacking the MM name I shall be quite vexed.

Probably the best way to approach the whole thing. Happy viewing! :)

TheVampwizimp:
I never noticed it before, but Borderlands borrows a lot from Mad Max. I should have noticed the similarities as I am a big fan of both, but for some reason I didn't catch it until the trailers for Fury Road. It was the villains of the new movie. They really seem more than ever like Borderlands' bandits, i.e, so wildly, suicidally bat-nuts insane that they dress like a leather sex dungeon under a Hot Topic and rave in ecstasy about mayhem and death. In other words, a lot of fun.

Shoot, not just Borderlands. Fallout, Rage, Borderlands, Book of Eli, Doomsday, Waterworld, Krush Kill n Destroy (a 90's RTS game) all owe a lot to Mad Max. I'm not sure if Mad Max and Road Warrior invented the "post-apocalyptic world where leather clad savages fight over water and fuel", but it definitely popularized it.

Gorrath:
I never found MM1 to be all that great. Yes it had its moments but it was sownright boring for stretches that seemed to go on forever. What I do appreciate about MM1 is that it set the stage in a semi-realistic fashion for MM2 and MM3 to build off of, to show how society changes as things get worse and worse. I love Road Warrior, it's one of my very favorite action movies. Fury Road looks fantastic, even if a few things in the trailer give he pause. Hope it lives up to the hype!

So, I just watched the first two Mad Max films for the first time, and after thinking about it for a bit, I think I like the first film more. A lot of it had to do with the fact that I've been so over exposed by media that's been heavily influenced by Mad Max 2 (e.g. Rage, Fallout, Borderlands etc.) so a lot of the novelty that made Mad Max 2 so iconic was lost on me (still a great film though). Since I had very little prior knowledge about the series when I began to watch them, I thought all of them were post-apocalyptic action movies, so I was really surprised to discover how different the original Mad Max was. The idea of a still functional society that is right on the edge of falling apart felt somehow more retroactively novel. And the depiction of Max going from happy family man to the tragic anti hero that he's most famously known for at the end was masterfully done. It's like a better Punisher film than any other Punisher that's been released to date. I was also surprised by how late the actual revenge aspect of the film kicked into gear within the story. You'd usually expect the tragic catalyst that spurs this kind of plot to happen right in the beginning.

jhoroz:

Gorrath:
I never found MM1 to be all that great. Yes it had its moments but it was sownright boring for stretches that seemed to go on forever. What I do appreciate about MM1 is that it set the stage in a semi-realistic fashion for MM2 and MM3 to build off of, to show how society changes as things get worse and worse. I love Road Warrior, it's one of my very favorite action movies. Fury Road looks fantastic, even if a few things in the trailer give he pause. Hope it lives up to the hype!

So, I just watched the first two Mad Max films for the first time, and after thinking about it for a bit, I think I like the first film more. A lot of it had to do with the fact that I've been so over exposed by media that's been heavily influenced by Mad Max 2 (e.g. Rage, Fallout, Borderlands etc.) so a lot of the novelty that made Mad Max 2 so iconic was lost on me (still a great film though). Since I had very little prior knowledge about the series when I began to watch them, I thought all of them were post-apocalyptic action movies, so I was really surprised to discover how different the original Mad Max was. The idea of a still functional society that is right on the edge of falling apart felt somehow more retroactively novel. And the depiction of Max going from happy family man to the tragic anti hero that he's most famously known for at the end was masterfully done. It's like a better Punisher film than any other Punisher that's been released to date. I was also surprised by how late the actual revenge aspect of the film kicked into gear within the story. You'd usually expect the tragic catalyst that spurs this kind of plot to happen right in the beginning.

Oh no doubt that MM1's staging was pretty masterful. I like the film, to be sure. But I saw these movies as a young person and rewatched them many times since. Back then MM1 didn't seem to be much of a crazy stretch while MM2 and 3 seemed to give us a really interesting take on where Max and the world were headed. Now that the plot, asthetics, story points, characters and kitchen sink from MM2-3 have been regurgitated by other movies ad nauseum, I can certainly see how MM1 seems novel by comparison. I'll never see it that way because of where it sits in the trilogy and history for me but I can totally appreciate why someone could watch all three now and conclude that MM1 was the best and most interesting of the trio.

Gorrath:

jhoroz:

Gorrath:
I never found MM1 to be all that great. Yes it had its moments but it was sownright boring for stretches that seemed to go on forever. What I do appreciate about MM1 is that it set the stage in a semi-realistic fashion for MM2 and MM3 to build off of, to show how society changes as things get worse and worse. I love Road Warrior, it's one of my very favorite action movies. Fury Road looks fantastic, even if a few things in the trailer give he pause. Hope it lives up to the hype!

So, I just watched the first two Mad Max films for the first time, and after thinking about it for a bit, I think I like the first film more. A lot of it had to do with the fact that I've been so over exposed by media that's been heavily influenced by Mad Max 2 (e.g. Rage, Fallout, Borderlands etc.) so a lot of the novelty that made Mad Max 2 so iconic was lost on me (still a great film though). Since I had very little prior knowledge about the series when I began to watch them, I thought all of them were post-apocalyptic action movies, so I was really surprised to discover how different the original Mad Max was. The idea of a still functional society that is right on the edge of falling apart felt somehow more retroactively novel. And the depiction of Max going from happy family man to the tragic anti hero that he's most famously known for at the end was masterfully done. It's like a better Punisher film than any other Punisher that's been released to date. I was also surprised by how late the actual revenge aspect of the film kicked into gear within the story. You'd usually expect the tragic catalyst that spurs this kind of plot to happen right in the beginning.

Oh no doubt that MM1's staging was pretty masterful. I like the film, to be sure. But I saw these movies as a young person and rewatched them many times since. Back then MM1 didn't seem to be much of a crazy stretch while MM2 and 3 seemed to give us a really interesting take on where Max and the world were headed. Now that the plot, asthetics, story points, characters and kitchen sink from MM2-3 have been regurgitated by other movies ad nauseum, I can certainly see how MM1 seems novel by comparison. I'll never see it that way because of where it sits in the trilogy and history for me but I can totally appreciate why someone could watch all three now and conclude that MM1 was the best and most interesting of the trio.

Also bear in mind that MM1 is famous for other things that we can now only see in retrospect.

1: It was the breakout role for Mel Gibson, who was easily one of the biggest stars of the 80's (and maybe the 90's).

2: The concept of "Australian cinema" was pretty much laughed at before MM1 came out. At the time, big, successful movies basically either came from the US or (to a much smaller extent) Hong Kong. MM1 was a breakthrough for Australian film-makers and actors.

3: As the article noted, the movie was made on a shoestring budget and still made $100 million (which was a hell of a lot in 1979). Assuming the 1/250 that the author states is true, that means the movie made a 25000% profit. That is INSANE.

THM:

soren7550:
You forgot to point out how Fury Road is a piece of American culture turned feminist propaganda piece that'll ruin all future action flicks by turning them into think pieces or some such.

'Seriously'

Having read the actual piece on RoK (and to be honest, the article you linked to is a sad hatchet job) the original writer also brings up the problem of the movie being named after a particular character that ends up being pushed into the background by somebody else (who happens to be a woman). It's possible that there isn't an underlying agenda in doing so, but it certainly sounds fishy.

Gender politics aside, if you go to see a movie called 'Mad Max', you expect the titular character to be A) the hero or B) the most important villain - otherwise, why name the movie after them? Isn't that character supposed to be the focus of the story? Seems a bit disingenuous to sell the movie to the public on a character, then sideline said character most of the time.

I primarily used that link instead since the idiot review in question doesn't deserve any traffic. It was the first one I was able to come upon, so...

soren7550:
I primarily used that link instead since the idiot review in question doesn't deserve any traffic. It was the first one I was able to come upon, so...

I don't think linking to the Mary Sue is much of an improvement to be honest.

OK, who cast Rosie Huntington-Whitely in a movie again? Did the casting agent not see the Transformers movie? She was fucking awful in that, worse than Megan Fox (and that's saying something). Did she do a movie or something that i've not seen that proves she has more acting ability than a disinterested stick insect?

soren7550:
I primarily used that link instead since the idiot review in question doesn't deserve any traffic. It was the first one I was able to come upon, so...

I respect that you don't like the RoK review, but I'm not sure the review you did link to was any better - at least the RoK one didn't insult any other reviewers while reviewing the movie.

Whatever RoK's gender politics may be, the point about the titular character being pushed into the background is a valid one, and certainly bears discussion.

Ihateregistering1:

3: As the article noted, the movie was made on a shoestring budget and still made $100 million (which was a hell of a lot in 1979). Assuming the 1/250 that the author states is true, that means the movie made a 25000% profit. That is INSANE.

My half assed digging reveals that MM was made on a $350,000-$400,000 budget (according to the director, but IMDb says it was done with $650,000, but also cites the $350,000 claim), and my nearly non existent math skills say 'ehhh, 25000% profit is right, maybe, I dunno how to do percents or fractions'.

Razorback0z:
I think I will be giving Circe de Mad Max a miss.

Im 50 years old next year and Im gonna show my age for a change. Mad Max 1 was a gritty, well conceived action/suspense drama that was ahead of its time in many ways. Its an excellent movie that still holds up well today, in fact its even more believable and living in Australia, the places it was filmed look just like Miller tried to portray them back then. His future has been all but realised.

Circe de Mad Max however builds on the utter nonsense of Thunderdome. A future where the last few drop of fuel are blown out the end of a flaming guitar by a guy in assless chaps. Its so incoherent as to be comedic. Its a future that will never be realised unless there happens to be an excess of oil, hockey masks and makeup after the apocalypse.

Damn shame really.

This sums up exactly my thoughts.

Mad Max and Mad Max 2 were fantastic movies, which rode on low budgets, raw creativity and pure grit.

Thunderdome... eh, it had its moments, I guess, but the least said about it, the better.

This? This looks like someone threw every bit of Max-inspired media from the last three decades (minus, possibly, the first two movies themselves) into a blender, and then sprinkled the result liberally with CGI and as much silly and over-the-top as possible. It seems to be exactly what I feared - Thunderdome 2: Louder, Campier and Sillier.

I'm definitely giving this one a wide berth, and this is coming from a life-long Max fan.

Damn shame indeed.

Road Warrior is my favorite of the 3, because of how over-the-top the evil biker gang under Lord Humungous were. I don't remember much of the first movie, and I almost forgot that movie's villain was called Toecutter. But like this article said, it was light on plot.

captcha: Sugar Mama
Now THAT sounds like a Mad Max character!

 

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