Star Trek: 25th Anniversary - A Highly Logical Adventure

Star Trek: 25th Anniversary - A Highly Logical Adventure

Star Trek: 25th Anniversary is a great adventure experience that succeeds at recreating the look and feel of the original TV show.

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Oh snap, I remember playing the shit out of this game. I always killed the red shirt.

I loved this game back in the day and now kind of have the urge to replay it.

In reference to the mission with the Hijacked Federation ship, it's very much an homage to "Wrath of Khan", which is why the Shield Override code was the first thing I thought of when I got to that mission(and if you search for different starships in the database, that's the only one that has an override code in the entry, which is a not so subtle hint what you're expected to do). It's the rest of the mission, subduing the pirates while saving the crew and ship is much more difficult. There are numerous ways to complete the mission(and most of the missions, in fact) but only one of them is the best ending. Making the wrong choices(especially in the Hijacked ship mission) will result in people getting killed. In fact, there's one way to utterly botch that mission, where you take out the pirates on the bridge, but it will also result in the ship being destroyed(and possibly the entire crew being killed).

Interestingly, you can still continue the game, IIRC, but StarFleet will chew you out over this and since all the mission scored get averaged out at the end, botching enough missions will result in an ending where you're fired from command.

One thing I wanted to say about the combat(that the reviewer didn't) is how the final starship battle at the end of the game is very difficult, even if you are used to playing flight sims and are comfortably with the starship combat(which you get to do a couple of missions before that). I've beaten the game numerous times, finished the X-Wing games numerous times and the final battle still tends to frustrate me. The people who made the game seemed to notice, because in the sequel, you're allowed to choose the difficultly of the starship battles as soon as you start the game. This includes the option to just bypass them entirely, which ironically isn't needed because only one of the battles in Judgement Rites in is particularly difficult and it doesn't actually matter if you win or lose that one.

Dalisclock:
I loved this game back in the day and now kind of have the urge to replay it.

In reference to the mission with the Hijacked Federation ship, it's very much an homage to "Wrath of Khan", which is why the Shield Override code was the first thing I thought of when I got to that mission(and if you search for different starships in the database, that's the only one that has an override code in the entry, which is a not so subtle hint what you're expected to do). It's the rest of the mission, subduing the pirates while saving the crew and ship is much more difficult. There are numerous ways to complete the mission(and most of the missions, in fact) but only one of them is the best ending. Making the wrong choices(especially in the Hijacked ship mission) will result in people getting killed. In fact, there's one way to utterly botch that mission, where you take out the pirates on the bridge, but it will also result in the ship being destroyed(and possibly the entire crew being killed).

Interestingly, you can still continue the game, IIRC, but StarFleet will chew you out over this and since all the mission scored get averaged out at the end, botching enough missions will result in an ending where you're fired from command.

One thing I wanted to say about the combat(that the reviewer didn't) is how the final starship battle at the end of the game is very difficult, even if you are used to playing flight sims and are comfortably with the starship combat(which you get to do a couple of missions before that). I've beaten the game numerous times, finished the X-Wing games numerous times and the final battle still tends to frustrate me. The people who made the game seemed to notice, because in the sequel, you're allowed to choose the difficultly of the starship battles as soon as you start the game. This includes the option to just bypass them entirely, which ironically isn't needed because only one of the battles in Judgement Rites in is particularly difficult and it doesn't actually matter if you win or lose that one.

I wish I had touched more on the choice aspect of the game because that's another element I was impressed with. The first time I tried Hijacked I botched it completely. The fact that I had the freedom to do so (or solve it through different means) was really impressive.

Wonderful game, and Judgement Rites is even better. I wish modern adventure game creators had half as much talent as the creators of these games.

Blood Brain Barrier:
Wonderful game, and Judgement Rites is even better. I wish modern adventure game creators had half as much talent as the creators of these games.

If you feel like playing a good modern adventure game, I really enjoyed the newly released "Technobabylon". Much like Stew here, I'm not the biggest fan of adventure games, but this one managed to hit my personal sweet spot in terms of puzzles. You generally only have a few items (no more than 8) and your current location is usually only a few screens, which means you don't wander across the entire world searching for possible items or solutions.

The writing is quite strong, I liked the pseudo-dystopian science fiction setting and the voice work was surprisingly alright for such a small production. On the whole, I'd recommend it to people who like certain aspects of adventure games, but hate obtuse puzzles.

StewShearer:
Whether I was fighting Elaski pirates or Romulans, the ship duels were almost always defined by brief moments of excitement punctuated by long stretches where nothing really happens.

Well, you were praising the game for its authenticity to the original show. :P

Scow2:

StewShearer:
Whether I was fighting Elaski pirates or Romulans, the ship duels were almost always defined by brief moments of excitement punctuated by long stretches where nothing really happens.

Well, you were praising the game for its authenticity to the original show. :P

Hahahaha! You have a point there. At least on the show though you got to see the crew looking all tense and worried between explosion. ;)

I had this. Never beat the final mission, in which you had to fight three Romulan ships...

Fat_Hippo:

Blood Brain Barrier:
Wonderful game, and Judgement Rites is even better. I wish modern adventure game creators had half as much talent as the creators of these games.

If you feel like playing a good modern adventure game, I really enjoyed the newly released "Technobabylon". Much like Stew here, I'm not the biggest fan of adventure games, but this one managed to hit my personal sweet spot in terms of puzzles. You generally only have a few items (no more than 8) and your current location is usually only a few screens, which means you don't wander across the entire world searching for possible items or solutions.

The writing is quite strong, I liked the pseudo-dystopian science fiction setting and the voice work was surprisingly alright for such a small production. On the whole, I'd recommend it to people who like certain aspects of adventure games, but hate obtuse puzzles.

Technobabylon has been on my radar but I haven't played it yet. I love obtuse puzzles, by the way.

There are a ton of good modern adventure games, just not many great ones. And I think 25th Anniversary falls into that category.

McMarbles:
I had this. Never beat the final mission, in which you had to fight three Romulan ships...

You mean two pirate ships and a fake Enterprise, I assume, but yeah, that battle is very hard. It doesn't help that in the original disk version, the entire mission a short away mission and then the final battle. In the CD-ROM version, they actually allowed you to explore the damaged Starship a lot more before the final battle.

Fat_Hippo:

Blood Brain Barrier:
Wonderful game, and Judgement Rites is even better. I wish modern adventure game creators had half as much talent as the creators of these games.

If you feel like playing a good modern adventure game, I really enjoyed the newly released "Technobabylon". Much like Stew here, I'm not the biggest fan of adventure games, but this one managed to hit my personal sweet spot in terms of puzzles. You generally only have a few items (no more than 8) and your current location is usually only a few screens, which means you don't wander across the entire world searching for possible items or solutions.

The writing is quite strong, I liked the pseudo-dystopian science fiction setting and the voice work was surprisingly alright for such a small production. On the whole, I'd recommend it to people who like certain aspects of adventure games, but hate obtuse puzzles.

I saw that but don't know much about it. After playing the Blackwell series, I've developed a respect for Wadeyejet(?) games, even though I have several I haven't even played yet(Gemini Rue is forever on my "Play next" list).

I remember trying to play this. Mostly TRYING, where for the most part all I got was random jumping from system to system with no way of knowing how to find the right planet and largely getting into random fights with enemy ships. I think I actually managed to get the first two missions eventually, though.

 

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