Entourage - Shallow Dudebro Movie With Awkward Celebrity Cameos

Entourage - Shallow Dudebro Movie With Awkward Celebrity Cameos

Entourage is a horrible, horrible movie that thinks throwing celebrity cameos in place of a plot or characters is how to make a good movie.

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I think it's fairly safe to throw the term "cis male" at this film repeatedly until it retreats to the self obsessed, toss-hole it dribbled out from. But hey, you wouldn't want your job to start feeling too much like fun now, would you? ;)

I heard that hollywood was all pretty sexist, racist, sexist, homophobic and sexist as it is. So this film may be an accurate portrayal of just how soul draining life would be to live and work around those people. Maybe.

image

I'm never getting tired of doing that

Marter:
... make sexist, racist, sexist, homophobic, or sexist comments,...

Oops. Yeah...might want to change that

EDIT: Unless that was all emphasis on how sexist these comments were

A word of advice... Don't now watch the show hoping to get some kind of reflexive appreciation or understanding of the film. It really is all that bad.

Is it still better than Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 though?

Wait...that's a movie? I thought all those pre-video trailers for this were just advertising a new season of the show. >.>

NinjaDeathSlap:
A word of advice... Don't now watch the show hoping to get some kind of reflexive appreciation or understanding of the film. It really is all that bad.

Is it still better than Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 though?

Marter on twitter said yes...but only just barely

I always though the show was just about douchebags, by douchebags, for douchebags. Marter's review would not disprove that. But I just watched a video in Cracked.com saying the whole show was an elaborate prank on the main cast.

So its basically more of the show, but in a movie format instead of a 50ish minute episode?

I'm down with that. Entourage is one of my guilty pleasures. The characters are all awful awful people, but all had stupidly redeeming qualities.

Johnny Drama was also the best character that wasn't Ari. He was totally alpha male and clung to the one memorable character he played way back in the day, some Conanesque viking guy who loved to shout "VICTORY!" Watching him try and fail at everything because of his ridiculous ideals of what a man is about was the greatest part of the show.

However the star was always Ari. He's so over the top, so fucked up, that you just couldn't help but love him. Its actually weird how many feminist women and gay men/women who adore the hell out of Ari despite the fact that he says literally the most sexist and homophobic stuff on the show. He had a gay assistant who Ari just reveled in making fun of. Yet interestingly he was also the most well rounded character on the show and had the most interesting story arc, mostly because everyone elses story arc always involved really stupid shit "We're making a movie! We need money to make the movie! We need to make this other movie first to make another movie!"

Yeah it made sense in context of the show, but it got old fast. Luckily everyone was just such a perfect douchebag and they failed constantly that I couldn't help but love watching them get slapped down.

Darth_Payn:
I always though the show was just about douchebags, by douchebags, for douchebags. Marter's review would not disprove that. But I just watched a video in Cracked.com saying the whole show was an elaborate prank on the main cast.

Trusting Cracked's "Today's Topic Is A Really Poorly Thought Out Conspiracy Theory About Pop Culture That Mostly Shows We Don't Know A Lot About The Media In Question" is not a good choice.

shintakie10:
However the star was always Ari. He's so over the top, so fucked up, that you just couldn't help but love him. Its actually weird how many feminist women and gay men/women who adore the hell out of Ari despite the fact that he says literally the most sexist and homophobic stuff on the show. He had a gay assistant who Ari just reveled in making fun of. Yet interestingly he was also the most well rounded character on the show and had the most interesting story arc, mostly because everyone elses story arc always involved really stupid shit "We're making a movie! We need money to make the movie! We need to make this other movie first to make another movie!"

Ari is pretty interesting character in his own right. Mainly because whilst he sucks as a human being he is hopelessly devoted to his wife. Also whilst he says most of the sexist/homophobic stuff on the show he is actually neither sounds odds but those who've watched the show will understand.

I like Entourage at the end of the day it's just suppose to be fun and I don't think it glorifies the 'dudebro' culture just being entertaining I fail to see the hate for it.

Thunderous Cacophony:

Darth_Payn:
I always though the show was just about douchebags, by douchebags, for douchebags. Marter's review would not disprove that. But I just watched a video in Cracked.com saying the whole show was an elaborate prank on the main cast.

Trusting Cracked's "Today's Topic Is A Really Poorly Thought Out Conspiracy Theory About Pop Culture That Mostly Shows We Don't Know A Lot About The Media In Question" is not a good choice.

I didn't say they were right, I said it was an alternate theory about the show, which was pretty clever and funny.
Much more than this movie, by the sounds of it.

I actually liked Entourage the show, at least at the beginning. The first few seasons were a guilty pleasure and a lot of fun, but then the show just started to go sideways. Almost every episode was "Oh no, Vince's career is over!! Oh wait, he's got it back!". Seriously, most Hollywood actors have 1, MAYBE 2 comebacks in their entire careers, Vince seemed to have one every month.

Drama's antics just got dumber and dumber as the show went on, to the point where it was impossible to see him as a person and instead he was just a plot device to do dumb stuff for laughs. Turtle's romance with Jamie-Lynn Sigler was so misplaced and ridiculous, and E continued to be whiny and annoying (that part stayed basically the same the whole show).

Really, the stars of the entire series were always Ari and Lloyd, his flamboyantly gay assistant (why those two didn't get a spin-off show is beyond me).

It's also interesting to think a little more in depth about the show. On the surface, the show seems to be an adolescent male fantasy: these guys live with their insanely rich actor friend, they don't have to work, they buy whatever they want, go to exclusive parties, and sleep with beautiful women. But the more you think about it, the more you realize they are basically all losers. If they weren't rich/didn't know Vince, none of these women would even talk to them, they'd all still be living in NYC and probably not doing so well (it's not like any of them are particularly bright or motivated). In other words, their fantasy lives only exist due to sheer dumb luck.

Ralancian:

shintakie10:
However the star was always Ari. He's so over the top, so fucked up, that you just couldn't help but love him. Its actually weird how many feminist women and gay men/women who adore the hell out of Ari despite the fact that he says literally the most sexist and homophobic stuff on the show. He had a gay assistant who Ari just reveled in making fun of. Yet interestingly he was also the most well rounded character on the show and had the most interesting story arc, mostly because everyone elses story arc always involved really stupid shit "We're making a movie! We need money to make the movie! We need to make this other movie first to make another movie!"

Ari is pretty interesting character in his own right. Mainly because whilst he sucks as a human being he is hopelessly devoted to his wife. Also whilst he says most of the sexist/homophobic stuff on the show he is actually neither sounds odds but those who've watched the show will understand.

I like Entourage at the end of the day it's just suppose to be fun and I don't think it glorifies the 'dudebro' culture just being entertaining I fail to see the hate for it.

Oh absolutely Ari is a great character. I still think one of my favorite moments was when Vince got blacklisted because he wouldn't do Aquaman 2 because he didn't want to compromise his work as an actor (I literally could not say that without laughing). The entire blacklist was from the head of one studio and Ari is arguing with the guy on the golf course. Guy has a heart attack and dies. Ari realizes this is his opportunity to get Vince back into movies and is literally disgusted with himself for thinking of that to the point he freaks out at...someone...when they suggest that now Vince can get movies again. Its the truth, Ari knows its the truth and he will exploit it, but he's not half the dick he pretends to be so he waits.

Ihateregistering1:
I actually liked Entourage the show, at least at the beginning. The first few seasons were a guilty pleasure and a lot of fun, but then the show just started to go sideways. Almost every episode was "Oh no, Vince's career is over!! Oh wait, he's got it back!". Seriously, most Hollywood actors have 1, MAYBE 2 comebacks in their entire careers, Vince seemed to have one every month.

Drama's antics just got dumber and dumber as the show went on, to the point where it was impossible to see him as a person and instead he was just a plot device to do dumb stuff for laughs. Turtle's romance with Jamie-Lynn Sigler was so misplaced and ridiculous, and E continued to be whiny and annoying (that part stayed basically the same the whole show).

Really, the stars of the entire series were always Ari and Lloyd, his flamboyantly gay assistant (why those two didn't get a spin-off show is beyond me).

It's also interesting to think a little more in depth about the show. On the surface, the show seems to be an adolescent male fantasy: these guys live with their insanely rich actor friend, they don't have to work, they buy whatever they want, go to exclusive parties, and sleep with beautiful women. But the more you think about it, the more you realize they are basically all losers. If they weren't rich/didn't know Vince, none of these women would even talk to them, they'd all still be living in NYC and probably not doing so well (it's not like any of them are particularly bright or motivated). In other words, their fantasy lives only exist due to sheer dumb luck.

Thinking back, you're probably right about Johnny Drama just being a plot device for laughs, but god is he a funny plot device for laughs. When he damn near pees his pants because he's too alpha male to chicken out when Chuck freakin Lidell challenges him to a fight? That was gold. Pure fuckin gold.

I remember thinking how confusing it was that Mike seemed to be the watchers character because the guy was a fuckin tool. He was smart, generally, and was the only one willing to say when something was complete shit, but he never grew as a character. There were glimpses where he could possibly grow, but the show was adamant that the group had to stay together no matter the cost so any outs that he had to become somethin more than what he was were stifled.

Turtle was just fuckin annoyin though. He was the most incompetent member of the group and had literally nothing going for him. Mike was at least smart enough to be Vinces manager. Johnny Drama was Vince's brother, but he was also still an actor (albeit a bad one), and Vince was Vince. Turtles main story arcs involved making a terribly failed Tequila business and...uhhh...getting beat by some 8 year old in a fight night tournament? They even made fun of the fact that Turtle didn't do anything, but never went farther than "So...what do you actually do around here Turtle?"

shintakie10:

Turtle was just fuckin annoyin though. He was the most incompetent member of the group and had literally nothing going for him. Mike was at least smart enough to be Vinces manager. Johnny Drama was Vince's brother, but he was also still an actor (albeit a bad one), and Vince was Vince. Turtles main story arcs involved making a terribly failed Tequila business and...uhhh...getting beat by some 8 year old in a fight night tournament? They even made fun of the fact that Turtle didn't do anything, but never went farther than "So...what do you actually do around here Turtle?"

In an interview with Trey Parker and Matt Stone (the South Park guys) they described Cartman as "that annoying fat kid who always hung around with you and your friends, and no one really liked him, but for some reason he was just kind of always there". Turtle is that fat kid.

Skatologist:
EDIT: Unless that was all emphasis on how sexist these comments were

It was, indeed, this. ;D

Ihateregistering1:
Really, the stars of the entire series were always Ari and Lloyd, his flamboyantly gay assistant (why those two didn't get a spin-off show is beyond me).

That would be fantastic! I imagine it could be called "The Gold Standard" (or whatever) and would have consisted of the best parts of Entourage (Ari Gold, Lloyd, celebrity cameos, Hollywood satire, etc.) without all of the bad parts (i.e. the entire main cast).

Jeremy Piven was pretty much the reason I watched this show in it's entirety and also what drew me to watch Lucky Number Slevin. Why isn't this guy in more things?

Citizen Graves:

Ihateregistering1:
Really, the stars of the entire series were always Ari and Lloyd, his flamboyantly gay assistant (why those two didn't get a spin-off show is beyond me).

That would be fantastic! I imagine it could be called "The Gold Standard" (or whatever) and would have consisted of the best parts of Entourage (Ari Gold, Lloyd, celebrity cameos, Hollywood satire, etc.) without all of the bad parts (i.e. the entire main cast).

Jeremy Piven was pretty much the reason I watched this show in it's entirety and also what drew me to watch Lucky Number Slevin. Why isn't this guy in more things?

If you haven't seen it, go watch "The Goods", it's basically Jeremy Piven being Ari Gold some more. Runs out of steam towards the end but I still found it really funny.

So, we have a reviewer, completely unfamiliar with the show upon which the movie is based, reviewing the movie? C'mon, that's like halfway to Polygon's Rock Band review. I mean, the episodes are thirty minutes long each, and the seasons are like half of your standard television seasons. Couldn't you have watched at least a few episodes to figure out what was going on? As someone who watched the entire series during it's initial run, I think I can give a different (hopefully useful) view of the movie to fans of the series.

The movie opens with the boys from Queens meeting up just nine days after Vincent's (Adrian Grenier) marriage to console him on its dissolution. Vince is doing surprisingly well, and looking for his next challenge, which involves both acting and directing his next movie, surprising Ari (Jeremy Piven), his former agent in the midst of returning to LA to take over for John Ellis as chairman and CEO of Time Warner. The movie largely mirrors a standard season from the TV series, dealing with the behind-the-seasons issues of making a major motion picture. In this case, it is securing extra funds so Vince can finish his directorial debut from Larsen (Billy Bob Thorton) and his son, Travis (Haley Joel Osment). Meanwhile, Vince's manager Eric (Kevin Connolly) is preparing for the birth of his child with his former girlfriend Sloane (Emmanuelle Chriqui). Vince's brother Drama (Kevin Dillon) is once again struggling with another failed attempt at making it in Hollywood, and last but certainly not least is Turtle (Jerry Ferrara) dealing with the unexpected windfall from the success of his tequila company.

The story plays out like a long episode of the show, which is both good and bad. The normal seasonal plot of dealing with problems in Hollywood plays out rather rushed and has a sudden ending, most likely a result of the compressed time span of a movie versus an entire season. Even with this issue, there are still plenty of spots for Jeremy Piven to shine. Luckily, the main cast has plenty of time to play off of one another. There are plenty of references to various elements from the series, great one-off laughs, many returning cameos, and it definitely feels like settling in with some old friends. Plenty of new celebrities make appearances. Turtle attempts to land Ronda Rousey, playing herself. While she isn't given much to do, acting does seem to be a bit outside her forte, and the one time she is required to show emotion, she doesn't really manage it. Meanwhile, Vince meets up with Emily Ratajkowski, who is given even less to do than Rousey.

One thing is certain: this is not a film for newcomers to the series. While there is a passing attempt at establishing the backstory, it goes by so fast is probably more interesting for those who already watch the show than those who haven't, and doesn't even touch on many of the things that are necessary to fully appreciate the movie. That isn't really too much a problem for fans, and let's face it, Entourage was never too deep to begin with, but newcomers would easily assume that many of the recurring characters and traits from the series are just random events in the movie. It is also a movie made by guys for guys, and it is unapologetic in doing so (bikinis - and several times just the bottoms - seem to be the staple wardrobe for many of the female extras in the movie). If you happen to have issues with that, I'd highly suggest steering clear.

To sum up, if you are a fan of the series, you will enjoy the film. It isn't a great film, but it is a solid attempt at transferring the TV show to the big screen. If the director (Doug Ellin) had any guarantee of future films, he could have set up a better "insider Hollywood" plot for the cast to deal with across multiple movies, fixing the main issue with the story. Entourage still manages to bring joy with Ari still being Ari and the interaction between the five main characters. I would give it three out of five stars.

I watched the show on and off for Ari and Johnny Drama, the rest of the main cast were simply unlikable. Ari Gold is of course based on real life agent Ari Emanuel, brother of Rahm (who famously sent a dead fish to some pollster who pissed him off). Assuming there's some stylistic family resemblance between the brothers, it may not just be the fictional character who's a little over the top. And Johnny is weirdly compelling in how obviously vulnerable he is in his shell of machismo. Just look at the hurt in the guy's eyes. But I guess that's the kind of stuff you miss keeping a sexist score for everyone.

Still, can't really picture the show having the makings of a good movie.

jammer170:
So, we have a reviewer, completely unfamiliar with the show upon which the movie is based, reviewing the movie? C'mon, that's like halfway to Polygon's Rock Band review.

Marter's the Escapist's resident film critic, cranking out a lot more reviews a week than Bob ever did (probably easier when he doesn't have to make a video for them). Besides, liking the show would make the review biased, and we all know how horrible bias is is. Seriously though, reviewers review adaptations all the time without being familiar with the source material. You think half the old guard have ever picked up a comic book before? How many critics do you think read the Harry Potter or Lord Of The Rings? Besides everything these days is some form of adaptation, spin off, remake or sequel. That'd be a lot of homework for a reviewer to do. Plus a good movie is a good movie regardless of previous knowledge. I saw Serenity in theaters when I was 15 and then watched the show after really enjoying the film. It gave me all the pertinent details I needed and introduced me to the characters well even without having even heard of the show before.

Good job on actually providing a fan's perspective though. Hopefully anyone who likes the show can take something from your summation. But for people like me, who aren't fans of the show this review is pretty relevant. Doesn't look like the movie would win me over.

Is it really a surprise? I mean, wasn't the movie just an extended version of the show? I don't know why it would seem odd that it would be more of the same junk.

make sexist, racist, sexist, homophobic, or sexist comments,

So what you're saying is, take your eight year old daughters to go see it?

OT: I never thought highly of the show, so I didn't expect any different from the movie. Anyways, lots of one-star films lately.

yeah the only reason I would go see this is to see more of Ari and lloyd (and the occasional bit of johny drama).

I liked the show for purely those reasons, and I'm not surprised at all that it pretty much hinges on you having seen the tv show before, the movie is entirely for fans of the show, so anyone else basically walks in already at a disadvantage.

Still, this movie is made for a specific kind of person, if you don't enjoy over the top/blunt sexist/homophobic/racist jokes, then you certainly won't enjoy this movie.

This is the movie that had Bob going "Why? Why would you do that? Why would anyone do that? What did I do to deserve this? What did anyone do to deserve this? Dear God, WHY?!!?" when he heard it would be coming out, isn't it? Well at least he was spared from having to watch it. Amusing that the guy they brought in to replace him would hate it about as much as Bob expected to.

Spot1990:
Marter's the Escapist's resident film critic, cranking out a lot more reviews a week than Bob ever did (probably easier when he doesn't have to make a video for them).

That doesn't excuse writing poor reviews. If he doesn't have the time to do it right, he just shouldn't do them. Honestly, I was surprised to find a review of the movie here. I would have guessed the fan bases of the Escapist and Entourage don't overlap much.

Spot1990:
Besides, liking the show would make the review biased, and we all know how horrible bias is is.

Bias is bad, but liking the series does not make one biased. Do you honestly think everyone who enjoyed The Fellowship of the Ring is somehow too biased to review The Two Towers?

Spot1990:
Seriously though, reviewers review adaptations all the time without being familiar with the source material. You think half the old guard have ever picked up a comic book before? How many critics do you think read the Harry Potter or Lord Of The Rings?

A major difference between this movie and the things you mention is things like Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings both tell the complete story start to finish. So do comic book movies. Even Serenity, which you mention below, only had thirteen episodes of backstory, and Joss Whedon explicitly stated he assumed no one had seen the TV series when he made the movie. The closest comparison I can think of it Star Trek Generations. I wouldn't recommend anyone go see that who hadn't at least seen a few episodes of The Next Generation. Film-goers would be wondering why that Data guy doesn't understand humor and what happened to Worf to mess up his forehead.

Spot1990:
Good job on actually providing a fan's perspective though. Hopefully anyone who likes the show can take something from your summation. But for people like me, who aren't fans of the show this review is pretty relevant. Doesn't look like the movie would win me over.

Given that I'm not a writer, it is quite kind of you to say so. The only reason I bothered to write it is because of how unbelievably poor I felt the original review was. The were multiple factual mistakes almost from the start. The movie is a ensemble piece, so there isn't any sort of a "lead actor" in this any more than there was in something like "Friends". If I was forced at gunpoint to pick one, I would have at least gone with Kevin Connolly's character Eric (actually the character is commonly referred to as E), given that he was actually given top billing in the opening sequence. The claim that the main characters go around making racist, sexist, or homophobic statements is simply untrue (only the character of Ari was ever known for making sexist or homophobic statements, but never anything racist - again, research would have helped here - and it was very toned down, for reasoned explained in the movie). Finally, claims that none of the actors can act I can't describe as anything other than complete bullshit. Jeremy Piven, Kevin Dillon, and Kevin Connolly were either nominated for or won awards for acting during its HBO run, including Emmys and Golden Globes. Heck, two of the main characters go by E and Drama, not Eric and Johnny! To me, the entire thing reads like the reviewer watched the first five minutes of it, left, and then wrote the article based on whatever information he could find on Wikipedia and the Internet.

The really sad thing is, there are plenty of perfectly valid criticisms of the movie. The running time of the movie versus a season of the TV show compressed all the plots and was a major detriment for the movie. It probably would have been a good idea to just dump Turtle's plot altogether in favor of beefing up the Hollywood plot. Vince's plot is pretty superficial, which is unfortunate given his plot in the second to last season. For fans, E had a decent plot, and Drama's plot was great. Ari had some great scenes too. As much as I appreciated them, there were quite simply too many cameos and quick scenes of former recurring characters. Doug Ellin needed three movies to really let the characters and story shine like I know they can. The trailers could have done more to make it obvious this movie *is* a direct sequel to the HBO show. I came away from the movie with many great moments, but I would probably suggest people go see it at a matinee showing, or even wait for it to show up on HBO. (It pains me to say that, because I would love for it to make enough money to justify more Entourage.)

EDIT: As a quick follow-on, the original article is a perfect example of a non-objective review. It doesn't do anything to actually consider what the movie is attempting to be, and rather is a review against what the reviewer would have preferred to see.

I for one, have always suspected Marter of being a butt.

A large one.

With visible veins like... everywhere.

Edit: image

This is one weird movie. I haven't seen it yet, but it grabs scores from 1 to full 10s. Most of the movie critics seems to hate it, while most normal audience seems to dig it (example: rotten tomatoes rates it 30% from critics and 84% from audience). Can't help but wonder if this is one of those "it's a completely ok movie but critics are too snobby to like it" type of movies.

Will have to watch it before I can know for sure, but I dig the hell out of the series though, so I'm pretty biased already.

Excludos:
This is one weird movie. I haven't seen it yet, but it grabs scores from 1 to full 10s. Most of the movie critics seems to hate it, while most normal audience seems to dig it (example: rotten tomatoes rates it 30% from critics and 84% from audience). Can't help but wonder if this is one of those "it's a completely ok movie but critics are too snobby to like it" type of movies.

Will have to watch it before I can know for sure, but I dig the hell out of the series though, so I'm pretty biased already.

Marter isn't wrong in the title. Entourage, even as a show, was a shallow dudebro extravaganza (with the exceptions of Ari and Lloyd and to an extent Johnny Drama). Critics were bound to hate the hell out of it.

Obviously the dudebros liked it, but the interesting thing is the amount of nondudebros that liked it most likely attributed to just how awful the show treats its dudebros. Johnny Drama is an alpha male who constantly fails because of his alpha maleism. Vince is the quintessential pretty boy who gives 0 fucks and because of that he continually shits the bed due to his lack of fuck giving. Mike is...there? He's there! And Turtle is totally inept at everything to the point the other characters point out how he's useless.

If you didn't get it you're not goin to like it (unless you're a dudebro, in which case the show is shallow enough to appeal to you). If you did get it, there's still a pretty decent chance you wont like it because they're all fairly horrible human beings. However there's a lot of people who still do love it.

Did anyone even expect anything else considering that it's based on the show Entourage which is as bad, if now worse considering that there is far more episodes?

Excludos:
This is one weird movie. I haven't seen it yet, but it grabs scores from 1 to full 10s. Most of the movie critics seems to hate it, while most normal audience seems to dig it (example: rotten tomatoes rates it 30% from critics and 84% from audience). Can't help but wonder if this is one of those "it's a completely ok movie but critics are too snobby to like it" type of movies.

Will have to watch it before I can know for sure, but I dig the hell out of the series though, so I'm pretty biased already.

Well, the reason you're going to get that is because it's based on an existing TV show, so most of the public who are actually going to pay money to see it are already fans of the show and want more of what they already enjoy; movie critics have to go see it and review it regardless of their feelings towards the show.

It's like audience reviews of "Fast and Furious" movies: the people who are going to pay money to see it are probably already huge fans, and thus are more likely to enjoy more of the same.

 

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