Zero Punctuation: Everybody's Gone To The Rapture

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Everybody's Gone To The Rapture

This week, Zero Punctuation reviews Everybody's Gone To The Rapture.

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So, another typical Chinese Room "game" - an audiobook, where you hold the W-key for an hour to listen to it with a lot of pause.
I feel those guys should just do that, audiobooks, as they clearly don't have the slightest grasp of what a game is supposed to be. You know, interactive in SOME way.

Everyone has reviewed this game.

Which has made me give up hope on finding someone who refuses to review this game.

Anyone who isn't a creationist should've known it was bad by its title alone.

I can't help but feel that the amount of effort gone into making the absolutely stunning scenery in this game has gone to waste, If I could I would take the exact map from this and make a puzzle solving narrative game out of it, like Last Window or something.

the flock next plz i think you'd ream it out real good especially because of its expiration date

OuendanCyrus:
I can't help but feel that the amount of effort gone into making the absolutely stunning scenery in this game has gone to waste, If I could I would take the exact map from this and make a puzzle solving narrative game out of it, like Last Window or something.

It doesn't even have to be a puzzle game. Even if it would do a similar thing like Stanley Parable and have a semi-dynamic narration that follows how you walk around and possibly interact with things would make the whole thing already better.

Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

I guess The Chinese Room are the only people who thought audio logs were the greatest story telling mechanism ever.

One of the most glowing examples of Yahtzee's name-changery yet. Bravo.

Hey, what's with the dig at Ethan Carter? Among scenery-touring, gameplay-light software where you bump into audio bits, it had the most interaction of all of them combined and then some, and that puzzle with the house layout house very clever indeed. It even had a context for why it all happened, who you are and why you are there. AND you could run. Very fast, actually, with unlimited stamina.

I remember thinking to myself: "Someday he's going to run out of things to liken other things to. Especially considering how abstract his metaphors are."

That was five years ago.

So did Yathzee run out of old games to do retro reviews of? Because that's what he normally does when there's nothing coming out for him to review.

I'm also surprised that I keep seeing reviews for this game(especially considering the lack of much to do). I hadn't heard of it until Jim Sterling-sons review(who said much the same thing) and frankly, it sounds like an indie game that normally doesn't get much attention. Dear Esther was at least novel for a moment when it was released and A Metaphor for Pigs had the Amnesia name deftly tacked onto it, but...this?

I wonder how much better their reviews would be if they hadn't forgotten to put the sprint button - which DOES exist - in the instructions? Lol. So far every review I've seen (okay, both of them) have complained bitterly about the lack of something which is in fact there, just undocumented. Oopsy.

http://www.thechineseroom.co.uk/blog/blog/a-few-bumps-on-landing

Maybe I'm severely immature, but "Buggery-on-Toast" is the best parody of quaint-little-English-town names I've ever heard.

Dalisclock:
Dear Esther was at least novel for a moment when it was released and A Metaphor for Pigs had the Amnesia name deftly tacked onto it, but...this?

Dear Esther also started out as a free mod. It's a lot easier to convince people to experience something artsy-fartsy, and easier to convince them it was a pleasant experience, when you don't treat it like a product. Much the same way people will enjoy a trip to an art museum, even the abstract modern parts, but wouldn't shell out to own a copy of whatever's there sight unseen. I'd always assumed the paid version of Dear Esther was meant for people who'd already enjoyed the original and felt like tossing a few bucks in its creator's tip jar, as it were.

Looks like The Talos Principle is still showing people how it's done.

I love Croteam.

Pyrian:
I wonder how much better their reviews would be if they hadn't forgotten to put the sprint button - which DOES exist - in the instructions? Lol. So far every review I've seen (okay, both of them) have complained bitterly about the lack of something which is in fact there, just undocumented. Oopsy.

http://www.thechineseroom.co.uk/blog/blog/a-few-bumps-on-landing

Yeah it's a bit bad that they didn't know about the run button but in a game that uses fewer buttons than a goddamn NES game you'd think they'd have enough buttons to have every goddamn permutation of "run" possible? Why stick with deliberately obtuse input lag-based mechanics? Why, with development time almost entirely focusing on graphics, animation and voice acting, did they leave such a feature to the last minute? No, "their artistic vision" is not an answer.

Sorry if I sound peeved, but it really isn't excusable at all. Being humble is great, but not an excuse for pretentiousness.

Steve the Pocket:

Dear Esther also started out as a free mod. It's a lot easier to convince people to experience something artsy-fartsy, and easier to convince them it was a pleasant experience, when you don't treat it like a product. Much the same way people will enjoy a trip to an art museum, even the abstract modern parts, but wouldn't shell out to own a copy of whatever's there sight unseen. I'd always assumed the paid version of Dear Esther was meant for people who'd already enjoyed the original and felt like tossing a few bucks in its creator's tip jar, as it were.

That and The Stanley Parable also started out as a free mod, whilst also giving players a sizeable free demo for the paid version(more of a P.T. type thing actually). It takes much more than what EBGttR's shown to get me to buy this type of games, you either need a proof of concept (Dear Esther, Stanley), a reputable history (Journey) or get lucky and have a big name and false promises guiding the way (A:AMfP).

Logience:
Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

Until Dawn came out a couple of days ago, and we have Phantom Pain, AC Syndicate, Fallout 4, the annual COD misery train...

Couldn't care less about Everybody's Gone to the Rapture at this point, but I did hope for a Bioshock reference and a glimpse at what Yahtzee think of the Stanley Parable. Double jackpot, all's good in the world, time for the mandatory rewatching.

The run button is never disclosed by the game, and requires unintuitively holding a button down for a short period before it activates. It's terrible design, and no one would find it without being told of its existence.

KDR_11k:
I guess The Chinese Room are the only people who thought audio logs were the greatest story telling mechanism ever.

They are the only people who think that audio logs actually count as a main gameplay mechanic rather than a story telling mechanism.

They work, for example, in System Shock 2 because the game already has great atmosphere and gameplay. Listening to these audio logs while you try not to get cornered by mutants, cyborgs and robots actually helped the player get immersed in the game.

When you compare this game to something like "Her story" you realise the main issue with these walking simulators, walking around adds absolutely nothing to the game.

"Her Story" is very low on the interactivity scale but it's still pretty engaging. It doesn't make you wonder about all the over the place in the vague hope that making a a world will to walk around will automatically bring immersion. There's also been a lot of thought put into the way the player experiences the story rather than just randomly distributing it around a game map.

Well said, as always. My only gripe (though it's not with you Yahtzee) is that the Escapist needs to change it's fucking video player back to the way it was.

Don't fix what ain't broke: especially when you can't polish a turd.

(Also Hatfall is better than many of the games Yahtzee reviews. Methinks he should review it.)

Well, I laughed at this because of the random name changes, because Yahtzee had to do something to liven up this boring excuse of a "game", and lost it at the Andrew Ryan bit. Well done!
Retro review suggestion: Assassin's Creed Rogue. More of what made Black Flag fun, and a twist on the Assassin/Templar dynamic.

Arnoxthe1:
Looks like The Talos Principle is still showing people how it's done.

I love Croteam.

Because it actually had puzzles and things to do besides walk around trying to piece together a narrative from (Everybody sing along!)
"Random documents and audio logs"

Bindal:
So, another typical Chinese Room "game" - an audiobook, where you hold the W-key for an hour to listen to it with a lot of pause.
I feel those guys should just do that, audiobooks, as they clearly don't have the slightest grasp of what a game is supposed to be. You know, interactive in SOME way.

Well, I don't know, I liked it, but the way I see it, it is simply a jigsaw puzzle where instead of parts of an image, you get parts of the character and world stories. It is a game, but a very simple one, with a rather flashy package. Oddly similar to "Her story".
I realize that might not be enough of a goal for a lot of players, but it really brings out the detective in me... maybe I'm boring.

Also there is a certain method to the structure and challenge to this jigsaw, as it is only possible to uncover all the pieces if some of the clues are followed in some specific orders, of course none of this is clearly communicated to the player, but I argue that that's the point.

... and yet, the only thing I can say for certain after this review is that I have a new word I need to use: "Douche-balloon".

Erik B-L:
Well said, as always. My only gripe (though it's not with you Yahtzee) is that the Escapist needs to change it's fucking video player back to the way it was.

Don't fix what ain't broke: especially when you can't polish a turd.

I actually find this new player to be much better than the old one. The ads don't bork the video for me anymore!

OT: I got convinced to play this by one of my friends who made particular note of how good the ending is. I now have a written note that says not to trust his opinion on games anymore.

Gone Rampant:

Logience:
Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

Until Dawn came out a couple of days ago, and we have Phantom Pain, AC Syndicate, Fallout 4, the annual COD misery train...

I doubt Yahtzee will review MGS5 Part 2 unless as a last resort. After that, that's only 5 games total, and COD won't be coming till November.

Gone Rampant:

Logience:
Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

Until Dawn came out a couple of days ago, and we have Phantom Pain, AC Syndicate, Fallout 4, the annual COD misery train...

There's also the Mad Max game, which kind of looks like shadow of mordor with cars.

Bindal:
So, another typical Chinese Room "game" - an audiobook, where you hold the W-key for an hour to listen to it with a lot of pause.
I feel those guys should just do that, audiobooks, as they clearly don't have the slightest grasp of what a game is supposed to be. You know, interactive in SOME way.

I realize its not for everyone, and I havent liked most of the walk-stories I've played but I really loved Gone Home.

I liked the story, I liked the presentation, I liked the varying themes...it was just a great evening worth of entertainment.

Darth_Payn:
Because it actually had puzzles and things to do besides walk around trying to piece together a narrative from (Everybody sing along!)
"Random documents and audio logs"

Well, even then, you didn't have to listen to or look at any of that. It was there much more to enhance the experience then to actually drive the plot forward.

But yeah, the game had amazing music, amazing engine, amazing aesthetic, amazing voice-overs, amazing functionality, amazing writing... I can truly say it goes right up there with such gems as Portal and Myst.

RatGouf:
Anyone who isn't a creationist should've known it was bad by its title alone.

I dunno, I think the idea of everybody randomly disappearing in some unexplained event has a lot of potential as story concepts go. Sure, it's not a sure-fire thing, and it depends a lot on the execution, but sometimes they can be pretty decent.

...although not "The Leftovers". "The Leftovers" is terrible.

As a side note, I'm somewhat saddened to discover that the name of the studio putting out all these crappy walking simulators is "The Chinese Room", as that thought experiment is awesome.

Logience:
Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

I think so far he's only really liked Bloodborne, which is good for #1.

Johnny Novgorod:

Logience:
Jesus Christ, nothing's coming out anymore. At this rate, Yahtzee won't be able to make a Top 5 video.

Wonder if he'd be able to do a retro Top 5 of 2007...

I think so far he's only really liked Bloodborne, which is good for #1.

He also thought well of Witcher 3, and had generally positive reviews of Talos Principle and Elite: Dangerous, if memory serves. Those have been the only ones which were even vaguely positive that I can recall.

I liked the game for the audio/visual experience that it was. It brought many thoughts and emotions. Maybe i'm just oversensitive, as others have mentioned that before. I know some people can't look past certain things that do not fall into known, catagorised boxes. Or require direct storytelling instead of thought provoking vagueness. That is par of the course for humans alike and it is fine. It isn't as religious as the name implies, so people dismissing it based on the title alone brings a heavy chuckle. Like a heavy sigh but with a chuckle. Very difficult to replicate without the precise quantities of emotion, that.
They really screwed up with the run button implimentation though. Tsk, that'll learn them!

Captcha: Nut case. Hah! That is actually funny, captcha. Well done for learning humour!

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