Rising Thunder - How We Learn Fighting Games and Why It's a Problem

Rising Thunder - How We Learn Fighting Games and Why It's a Problem

There is a problem with fighting games: People aren't playing them. More accurately, people aren't learning to play them.

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The problem is lack of adequate tutorials. Off the top of my head, I can think of a grand total of one fighting games which have tutorials which are a good standard (Guilty Gear Xrd).

Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

You have to play to learn fighting games. I don't that mind so much as fighting games are competitive as hell in nature. I get that people want to have access to games, but we shouldn't be looking at video games with high skill ceilings as a negative thing. A lot of people like hard games, especially in today's age where some gamers think that games hold the players hand a bit too much.

My issue with fighting games is balance issues and a lack of punishment for the overuse of cheap tactics in online modes.

Just a note. This article was written when Rising Thunder was only a week into its alpha, about a month ago. It does not take into account patches alterations made to the game since then.

Also, just to throw in another 2 cents "High skill ceiling" and "hard to learn" are not the same thing. Examine the game of Go. It is very easy to learn but it's skill ceiling is very high. This is true of many older games of skill. Fighting games can be transparent and easy to learn while still being complex and having high skill ceilings.

All this and no mention of Divekick? I am disappointed! Divekick is the primary example of what you get when you simplify fighting mechanics to somewhere near the logical conclusion.

I'm more disappointed in the analogy trying to compare the knight to the hadouken. The knight is your shoryuoken. Pawns, or Rooks at most, are the Hadouken.

And what really "stops" people from "really" playing fighting games (I threw up a little in my mouth because of that statement, by the by) is the lack of a strong tutorial system, as well as a community that can be... Really toxic towards newbies at times. Systems need to be in place to help the players learn more easily, as well as help encourage others to help said players. Guilty Gear (and Blazeblue as well), help in some regards... But you need to spend time to help anyone learn the ins and outs f characters regardless.

Case in point...? My sister, when she was really young and playing Barbie and Mary Kate games...? She could do the hadouken pretty easily after she saw how it was done a few times. Shoryuoken, on the other hand...? Never could get the hang of it (at the time).

Great article! Really interesting perspective on Rising Thunder and the difficulty of entering fighting games as a whole.

Personally, I believe that the core part of fighting games is the process of learning how to play them. It's a journey, one fraught with the perils of frustration, challenge and game rage. But at the same time a journey where, presuming you keep at it, progress is almost inevitably made and the results of your labor can be immensely gratifying. I'll draw a tentative comparison to the Souls series (+Bloodbourne); at first an area can seem insurmountable, but you learn the environment, you learn the enemies, you learn your character, the boss and eventually progress is made, and it feels good. Only in fighting games you have the added level of complexity of the opponent being human.

Essentially, both are difficult to learn and at times frustrating, with the games seeming to deliberately obfuscate their mechanics - but in a twisted sense, for many people that only adds to the appeal. It's a challenge, one which is really worth taking on.

Hell, I've only recently gotten into the genre, starting with Super Street Fighter AE when it was on Games With Gold for the 360, so I've got fairly recent experience of scaling that learning curve. But I'm bloody glad I kept with it, once you know your stuff the games are deep.

Anywho, enough about my experience, about Rising Thunder. The crux of your article seems to be that Rising Thunder's attempts to simplify fighting games to allow ease of access to newcomers, whilst a good first step, doesn't totally achieve it's goal. It changes special, motion-based move to a single key, but doesn't do much to help people with the other essentials; normals, movement, combos and tactics - and that you believe the game (or at least, future fighting games) should address this if they wish to expand their player base. If I've interpreted this right, its an interesting and very valid perspective, but I'll add my two cents to a few points

MyLifeIsAnRPG:
But input complexity is only one aspect of fighting games that leads to a lack of mechanical transparency. There are tons of other mechanics, from combos, to mix-ups, to simple move utility, that are hidden from the player, and not necessarily behind an execution barrier! When the player doesn't understand how or why to use these mechanics, all he can do is mash buttons and hope something works, and that is where button-mashing comes from.

This is where Rising Thunder stumbles. It tells you how knights work and sends you off to capture the king, but we still don't know how bishops, rooks, and the queen work.

This issue is, in my opinion, less to do with game design and more to do with the game having an adequate tutorial - something that we won't know about until the game releases. In my experience with Rising Thunder, simply having the specials be single keys allowed me to focus less on execution, more on mindgames. That said, I have had quite a lot of experience Street Fighter 4's systems, which as you point out, shares many similarities to Rising Thunders. My issue with a lot of what you write is that some of the issues that you point out are, to myself and many others, some of fighting games' greatest strengths. The learning process is huge part of the appeal, and something that makes fighting games quite uniquely compelling.

MyLifeIsAnRPG:
For example, Street Fighter's special moves are frequently criticized as being too difficult to execute, but rarely do we examine its normal moves. Conventional wisdom says these moves are simple to do: press a button and they happen. But Street Fighter characters sometimes use different attacks depending on how close they are to the opponent, and these attacks can differ greatly. Some are cancelable and some aren't. Some have large and disjointed hitboxes, some don't. Some are safe on block, and some open you up to huge punishes. How do you know what attack you are going to throw? You don't. You just have to judge what the game considers "close."

Normal moves are, in my opinion, harder to learn to use appropriately than combos, for all of the reasons you've stated. But at the same time, they define a character, and are one of the main means of getting attached to a character in the game. The time you spend learning all of those different attacks, whilst a potential barrier to someone hoping to quickly know the game, can often positively impact a player in the long term, by giving them their character which they can play their way. It'd be hard to have this kind of character depth in a roster without this complexity.

MyLifeIsAnRPG:
Rising Thunder does none of this. There is no simple universal cancel system. Instead, specific normals can only combo into very specific other normals via Street Fighter style "target combos." These target combos aren't told to the player in any way. Instead, they have to be learned in training mode. Outside of target combos, normals have to be "linked" together by timing them very precisely, sometimes within only a few frames. You can cancel normals into special moves and super moves, but only on hit or block. Even then, certain normal moves can't be special canceled at all... and the game doesn't tell you which ones. Meanwhile, games like Skullgirls allow you to cancel any normal you have, even when whiffe

Just want to point out that it's a hell of a lot easier to link normals together along with specials in Rising Thunder than it is in Street Fighter 4; and whilst Skullgirls may allow you to cancel any normal, that and other parts of the game adds oodles of horrific complexity when you actually fight another person. Similarly, you mention Persona 4's easy combo strings, whilst indeed easy to do that can lead to very immediately in your face, unpredictable combat that both fails to teach, and can lead to new players' defenses getting overwhelmed.

Also, one thing that I don't think you really touched on at all was the excellent ranking system in Rising Thunder. The tiered system does a pretty adept job at matching you up with players at whatever level of skill you are, leading to a fun times regardless of expertise.

Addressing your solutions:
1. Is 8 buttons really an issue? On a controller pad when someone's playing any other genre almost all of the buttons are incorporated, which takes some learning to get right.
2. Visual indictators mean nothing to a player without context - either through a tutorial or match experience. It's always a good idea, but if people aren't paying attention and are just fooling around with the game, it won't help.
3. Rising Thunder addresses this directly, but just for the sake of it, is it really 'hiding' moves to have them on a command list? I didn't think so when I started, just looked up in training mode, thinking it was a good idea to go there first before online! Special moves are crucial, and in some cases can be taught in character-specific tutorials (P4 Arena, GG Xrd).
4. True enough, learning from the past is important. But I don't think the past is always telling us that motion-controlled specials and such are redundant.

All in all, I think it's a bit too early to tell whether or not Rising Thunder will accomplish its goal. So far it's managed to juggle a good deal of mechanical complexity and character differentiation with a easy to use single button specials and a ranking system that pits people of the same level together. If a good tutorial gets included in the full game alongside other learning tools you've mentioned, it'll allow people to transition from button mashing fun to getting further into the game FAR easier than any previous titles. Even in pre-Alpha state, Rising Thunder is going a good way to increasing accessibility.

Apologies for the long and rambling response. Didn't have time for focused/structured one! Hopefully something of worth there, and again, nice article!

I won't lie...if you can't do a simple 4-2-6 + X/A move on command, you're probably not going to have a good time at any fighting game, regardless of how they make it.

AzrealMaximillion:
Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

The Skullgirls one is really bad. It does not help at all.

Paragon Fury:
I won't lie...if you can't do a simple 4-2-6 + X/A move on command, you're probably not going to have a good time at any fighting game, regardless of how they make it.

Cause everyones a pro when they start.

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:
Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

The Skullgirls one is really bad. It does not help at all.

I disagree. It helped me understand its mechanics and a lot of general terminology that a lot of other fighting games don't bother to explain e.g. Street Fighter IV The problem is, no matter how in depth the tutorials are, the only way to really learn is to go online and get experience plaing other players (which a majority of the time means losing a shit ton of games for the first couple of months)

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:
Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

The Skullgirls one is really bad. It does not help at all.

Paragon Fury:
I won't lie...if you can't do a simple 4-2-6 + X/A move on command, you're probably not going to have a good time at any fighting game, regardless of how they make it.

Cause everyones a pro when they start.

I'm sorry, but if you can't handle a simple stick direction + button press, you probably aren't even capable of playing video games. This "Not everyone is a pro when they start" and "Think of the casuals!" attitude people have now is really bad for the quality and competitiveness of games - see; Heroes of the Storm, CoD, Halo 4 etc.

You know what? I wasn't a pro either when I started; but I didn't complain the games were too hard. I buckled the fuck down and learned them and now I can competently play most, if not all, games put before me.

Should they make better tutorials and training so that new players don't have to cut through the crap and information dumps I did to learn? Yes, because that is the proper way to teach and introduce new players.

Should they keep making games easier and easier (which, invariably in video games, lessens the enjoyment of high-skill players) so that anyone can play? Absolutely not - especially when you look at games like WoW and Halo and see that doing this very thing almost completely killed them.

09philj:
The problem is lack of adequate tutorials. Off the top of my head, I can think of a grand total of one fighting games which have tutorials which are a good standard (Guilty Gear Xrd).

GG games always have had a good one, if I recall correctly.
That and Skullgirls actually has a decent one aswell.

Paragon Fury:

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:
Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

The Skullgirls one is really bad. It does not help at all.

Paragon Fury:
I won't lie...if you can't do a simple 4-2-6 + X/A move on command, you're probably not going to have a good time at any fighting game, regardless of how they make it.

Cause everyones a pro when they start.

I'm sorry, but if you can't handle a simple stick direction + button press, you probably aren't even capable of playing video games. This "Not everyone is a pro when they start" and "Think of the casuals!" attitude people have now is really bad for the quality and competitiveness of games - see; Heroes of the Storm, CoD, Halo 4 etc.

You know what? I wasn't a pro either when I started; but I didn't complain the games were too hard. I buckled the fuck down and learned them and now I can competently play most, if not all, games put before me.

Should they make better tutorials and training so that new players don't have to cut through the crap and information dumps I did to learn? Yes, because that is the proper way to teach and introduce new players.

Should they keep making games easier and easier (which, invariably in video games, lessens the enjoyment of high-skill players) so that anyone can play? Absolutely not - especially when you look at games like WoW and Halo and see that doing this very thing almost completely killed them.

Those filthy casuals are ruining games. We must end them once and for all.

jhoroz:

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:
Fighting games seem to be very hard to tutorialize. People say that Skullgirls and the new Killer Instinct have good ones, but they only really go through quick the terms and pratice them.

The Skullgirls one is really bad. It does not help at all.

I disagree. It helped me understand its mechanics and a lot of general terminology that a lot of other fighting games don't bother to explain e.g. Street Fighter IV The problem is, no matter how in depth the tutorials are, the only way to really learn is to go online and get experience plaing other players (which a majority of the time means losing a shit ton of games for the first couple of months)

Don't forget the constant harrasment for not being a pro at birth.

SilverHunter:
And what really "stops" people from "really" playing fighting games (I threw up a little in my mouth because of that statement, by the by) is the lack of a strong tutorial system, as well as a community that can be... Really toxic towards newbies at times. Systems need to be in place to help the players learn more easily, as well as help encourage others to help said players. Guilty Gear (and Blazeblue as well), help in some regards... But you need to spend time to help anyone learn the ins and outs f characters regardless.

09philj:
The problem is lack of adequate tutorials. Off the top of my head, I can think of a grand total of one fighting games which have tutorials which are a good standard (Guilty Gear Xrd).

It's a bit of a long post but I am going somewhere with this.

I played DCUO's PvP, which for all the trash it got, up until recently actually had one very, very strong game mode that was fairly balanced (at least restricting certain things helped even it out a lot more too). I also wrote the majority of PvP guides available for the legends game mode, regularly played against the best the game had to offer and even founded a league solely dedicated to helping people learn what it took to play PvP at a competitive level. So I'm more qualified than most to be talking about this.

The previously mentioned league would run a number of drills, everything ranging from maximizing survivability, to damage, to surviving when out numbered to fighting properly when you out number the opponent. The one I ran the most out of all of the different drills we had, were the ones going over the basic mechanics of the game.

For a long while I suspected the lack of adequate tutorials explaining the mechanics was the biggest problem the entrance into PvP had (and don't get me wrong, it is a problem). As it turns out, the biggest problem I kept running into was people getting in their own way. Rather than learning how to improve their abilities (with this information and people willing to teach it readily accessible nearly 24/7) they simply would rather complain about how "this is stupid and won't help" or "I think this is broken" (in spite of repeated confirmation from both experienced players and developers alike it isn't).

So adding in tutorials will only help so much. You need to give players the drive to learn these things. That may mean displaying your ELO and ranking, having a help section in game which can link directly to community made guides on certain topics, step by step breakdowns, and finally giving players rewards for mastering certain mechanics of the game. These can range from character skins, to trophies, hell, things like that.

In short, the game needs to help players not step on their own feet.

I'm sorry for hurting anyone's feelings in advance, but anyone who says that people get harassed for not being good at fighting games blatantly has NO idea what they're talking about. The FGC is quite an open community and has people from tonnes of different skill ranges playing.

You have to realize that playing fighting games takes a lot of practice. Your skill level is in a clear and direct proportion to the amount you practice. Most fighting games don't need to give a tutorial as you get specific command lists for each character. These commands are (the vast majority of the time) based on moving your stick in certain directions then pressing a button, that's it. The resulting diagrams are often extremely concise and if you take the time to read up on what each symbol means, you'll be able to grasp it fairly quickly. On top of this, if you're still struggling you can visit one of the many online fighting game communities and ask them for help, of which there is a surplus of help available.

To put this in perspective I have around an average of 600-650 hours clocked in on Street Fighter IV and I'm around the 1.8-2k PP mark. This may be high to some people, low to some. It's 100% on a person to person basis and is highly dependent on how you train. There was a time circa 2013 where I was unable to land a shoryuken input every time consistently, and that's fine. All these things come to you with practice.

I find that fighting games are one of the most rewarding genres purely for the incredibly high skill ceiling - there's always something you can improve on, regardless of whether you're a 300pp player or Daigo. All you need is that motivation to just keep at it, practice, and fight through the losses. Watch replays of yourself online.. Where did you go wrong? How could you improve your game?

What I'm really trying to say is: If you're being dissuaded by losses online, persist and keep at it. If you feel like you're being 'harassed' by someone for not being good enough, just block them and move on. 99% of the community is not like that and if you're putting in the dedication to get better and not blatantly complaining and getting salty with no attempts to improve, you'll fit in just fine.

RaikuFA:
Don't forget the constant harassment for not being a pro at birth.

Sure, if you played a handful of online matches and quit after you got your feelings hurt instead of muting douchbags.

I find "harassment" for sucking at games is more of a factor in team based games. In 1v1 fighting games there's not too much trash talk. If you lose its on you and you alone. Not everyone who is good at the game is playing to be pro. Some people legit like playing a game and *gasps* like getting good at it.

AzrealMaximillion:

RaikuFA:
Don't forget the constant harassment for not being a pro at birth.

Sure, if you played a handful of online matches and quit after you got your feelings hurt instead of muting douchbags.

I find "harassment" for sucking at games is more of a factor in team based games. In 1v1 fighting games there's not too much trash talk. If you lose its on you and you alone. Not everyone who is good at the game is playing to be pro. Some people legit like playing a game and *gasps* like getting good at it.

Considering my only time playing was not only getting curbstomped but getting death threats for being a "worthless scrub" then you can see why I hate the fgc.

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:

RaikuFA:
Don't forget the constant harassment for not being a pro at birth.

Sure, if you played a handful of online matches and quit after you got your feelings hurt instead of muting douchbags.

I find "harassment" for sucking at games is more of a factor in team based games. In 1v1 fighting games there's not too much trash talk. If you lose its on you and you alone. Not everyone who is good at the game is playing to be pro. Some people legit like playing a game and *gasps* like getting good at it.

Considering my only time playing was not only getting curbstomped but getting death threats for being a "worthless scrub" then you can see why I hate the fgc.

Who threatened you? a 12 year old on Xbox Live?

That kind of immature verbal vomiting has been in the gaming community since mics were able to be used online. That's not exclusive to fighting games' community. Please go play a Dota 2 or CS:GO match purposefully bad and see vitriol in different languages thrown at you. Blaming fighting games for bad behaviour that happens in nearly all online experiences in any genre is silly.

And you getting mad at fighting games for you "getting curbstomped" is like an untrained person blaming the sport of Boxing for his KO. Seems you played very little of a fighting game and are angry you weren't good immediately.

AzrealMaximillion:

RaikuFA:

AzrealMaximillion:

Sure, if you played a handful of online matches and quit after you got your feelings hurt instead of muting douchbags.

I find "harassment" for sucking at games is more of a factor in team based games. In 1v1 fighting games there's not too much trash talk. If you lose its on you and you alone. Not everyone who is good at the game is playing to be pro. Some people legit like playing a game and *gasps* like getting good at it.

Considering my only time playing was not only getting curbstomped but getting death threats for being a "worthless scrub" then you can see why I hate the fgc.

Who threatened you? a 12 year old on Xbox Live?

That kind of immature verbal vomiting has been in the gaming community since mics were able to be used online. That's not exclusive to fighting games' community. Please go play a Dota 2 or CS:GO match purposefully bad and see vitriol in different languages thrown at you. Blaming fighting games for bad behaviour that happens in nearly all online experiences in any genre is silly.

And you getting mad at fighting games for you "getting curbstomped" is like an untrained person blaming the sport of Boxing for his KO. Seems you played very little of a fighting game and are angry you weren't good immediately.

I have played MOBA's . They're just as bad. Don't see why the FGC has to be that toxic as well.

RaikuFA:
I have played MOBA's . They're just as bad. Don't see why the FGC has to be that toxic as well.

Just curious, which fighting game did you play and on which platform? Both your XBL and Steam profiles show no fighting games on record at all. I'm not sure I've ever heard of anyone getting threatened in any way for being bad in a fighting game dude. Sure you get the occasional person who'll message you calling you a scrub if you lose, but they tend to be douchebags and people like that are often shunned. Death threats are on another level, and if anything you should report whoever sent said offending message to their local authorities. Don't let a few bad eggs stop you from embracing a massive community which is incredibly welcoming/helpful. It's constantly expanding and the big budget releases are drawing even more to the scene. There has never been a better time to get into fighting games!

Bradmaster Flash:

RaikuFA:
I have played MOBA's . They're just as bad. Don't see why the FGC has to be that toxic as well.

Just curious, which fighting game did you play and on which platform? Both your XBL and Steam profiles show no fighting games on record at all. I'm not sure I've ever heard of anyone getting threatened in any way for being bad in a fighting game dude. Sure you get the occasional person who'll message you calling you a scrub if you lose, but they tend to be douchebags and people like that are often shunned. Death threats are on another level, and if anything you should report whoever sent said offending message to their local authorities. Don't let a few bad eggs stop you from embracing a massive community which is incredibly welcoming/helpful. It's constantly expanding and the big budget releases are drawing even more to the scene. There has never been a better time to get into fighting games!

It was on Street Fighter 4 and Arcana Heart 3 on PSN(don't think I have it on my profile). Police don't do jack shit about online threats. Plus, I'm not suprised they still act like this from the arcade days.

RaikuFA:

Those filthy casuals are ruining games. We must end them once and for all.

Just reminded me of something I came up with recently... I'm 35 years old and I've been gaming since I was 5. When I hear people talk about casual play I think to myself I've been around for 30 years doing this shit and if I want to play casual I've goddamn well earned the right. My quarters fueled this industry. I've worn my skin down raw on gamepads, bled in PC cases, pioneered overclocking, owned one of the very first 3D accelerator cards and sent my top scores and endgame screens captured on polaroid to Nintendo Power. I played MUDs, the original Neverwinter Nights on AOL, hosted LAN parties, taken part in the tournaments that spawned ESports, played MtG in Beta without having a clue how popular it would be or how much those cards would be worth.

The point is that having been a gamer since the mid-1980's, and having been through a lot of bullshit, I've come to the conclusion that what I've striven for in getting gaming as a hobby to be more mainstream accepted means that ALL types of play is valid and none are the gatekeepers of what is and is not gaming.
Hardcore, casual, doesn't matter its all valid and everyone deserves to play how they want. Tolerance and inclusivity are two-way streets.

Imperioratorex Caprae:

RaikuFA:

Those filthy casuals are ruining games. We must end them once and for all.

Just reminded me of something I came up with recently... I'm 35 years old and I've been gaming since I was 5. When I hear people talk about casual play I think to myself I've been around for 30 years doing this shit and if I want to play casual I've goddamn well earned the right. My quarters fueled this industry. I've worn my skin down raw on gamepads, bled in PC cases, pioneered overclocking, owned one of the very first 3D accelerator cards and sent my top scores and endgame screens captured on polaroid to Nintendo Power. I played MUDs, the original Neverwinter Nights on AOL, hosted LAN parties, taken part in the tournaments that spawned ESports, played MtG in Beta without having a clue how popular it would be or how much those cards would be worth.

The point is that having been a gamer since the mid-1980's, and having been through a lot of bullshit, I've come to the conclusion that what I've striven for in getting gaming as a hobby to be more mainstream accepted means that ALL types of play is valid and none are the gatekeepers of what is and is not gaming.
Hardcore, casual, doesn't matter its all valid and everyone deserves to play how they want. Tolerance and inclusivity are two-way streets.

That's what I've been trying to say.

RaikuFA:

Imperioratorex Caprae:

RaikuFA:

Those filthy casuals are ruining games. We must end them once and for all.

Just reminded me of something I came up with recently... I'm 35 years old and I've been gaming since I was 5. When I hear people talk about casual play I think to myself I've been around for 30 years doing this shit and if I want to play casual I've goddamn well earned the right. My quarters fueled this industry. I've worn my skin down raw on gamepads, bled in PC cases, pioneered overclocking, owned one of the very first 3D accelerator cards and sent my top scores and endgame screens captured on polaroid to Nintendo Power. I played MUDs, the original Neverwinter Nights on AOL, hosted LAN parties, taken part in the tournaments that spawned ESports, played MtG in Beta without having a clue how popular it would be or how much those cards would be worth.

The point is that having been a gamer since the mid-1980's, and having been through a lot of bullshit, I've come to the conclusion that what I've striven for in getting gaming as a hobby to be more mainstream accepted means that ALL types of play is valid and none are the gatekeepers of what is and is not gaming.
Hardcore, casual, doesn't matter its all valid and everyone deserves to play how they want. Tolerance and inclusivity are two-way streets.

That's what I've been trying to say.

I figured. I just needed a jumping off point to spout my spiel.

It's all well and good wanting to play games casually, and I'm all for it. It's just incredibly hard for fighting games to cater to both the casual and the dedicated player. You often get a whole crowd of people stating that fighting games are too difficult to get into and how they get bodied by other players etc, but that's how it has to be. Devs flat out reducing the mechanical difficulty of these games is not an option as it drastically lowers the skill ceiling. A desire for tutorials in game are fine but all of these are easy enough to find in resources online and anyone who says that they can't get better due to this lack of in game help are kidding themselves.

The only issue with a lot of current fighters is the way that the online ranking system works. A lot of the time players are put up against players who are disproportionately stronger than them and when it happens multiple times it definitely discourages.

My only suggestions to people who want to play fighting games casually is that you just flat out ignore the points system, and if you get too stressed fighting against randoms online, find a group of friends willing to play unranked and just play with those. As you learn new tech, your friends will have to adapt to catch up and you will 100% see a rise in skill level without all the effort in the world required. A lot of my hours in Street Fighter have come from just setting up an endless lobby with ~7 of my friends and just having a great time playing. The competition makes itself and you can have a laugh at the same time! I found that through all of my playtime, the most valuable skills have been picked up from just playing locally with housemates or in endless with friends. There's something about playing with people you know that makes you want to pick it up that much more, and I'd highly recommend trying it!

My problem with fighting games is that they aren't hard to learn, they just require you spend a lot of time learning them. I simply don't have the time to spend in training mode drilling the same combos over and over again until I can do them through memorization. I don't have the time to sit down and learn all the openers my character has and which are or aren't safe on block. Learning a fighting game is a huge time investment, more than anything else.

Compare that to an FPS. This button shoots. These sticks move and aim you. The knife button is here. That's all you really need to be on the average person's level. Everything after that is just fine-tuning your aiming skills and knowing where the best positions are on the map. The pro counter-strike players just aim better and know where to go. That's the only difference.

If possible, fighting games should learn from FPS's

I've got no problem with fighting games taking time to learn. If I did, I wouldn't play grand strategy, Twitch Based Shooters, High Speed action games, RTS, etc. It really seems people these days don't want to put in the work to get good at games. If I spend upwards of $60 ($75 here in Canada) on a game. I'm going to play the shit out of it. People saying thy don't have the time to play certain games I think are trying to play too many at once.

 

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