8 Awesome Things New Gamers Will Never Get to Experience

8 Awesome Things New Gamers Will Never Get to Experience

If you're new to video games as a hobby, you'll likely never get to experience these eight things.

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Err using the cheat code on here didn't work on here (I was using the arrow keys near the numbers locks)...

Also you missed out those booklets of cheats on mang games that gaming magazine sometime come as freebies but I suppose they are similar to those cheat hotlines. Also those preview dvds like from E3 were neat too before the rise of broadbands.

EDIT- Oh yeah, arcades do suck alot these days (there four of them over here) since they had become more of the coin gambling base games and have arcade version of the mobile/ tablets games like Flappy Bird.

These days you have such a vast choice of games to play, we have probably reached the point where its impossible to play all the great games within a lifetime (especially once you get out of school and get a job). You have to really think about where to spend your time and money, but if you make wise choices, you will always be rewarded with a great game.

Back in the old days you went to a store and they had maybe a collection of 10 games. Half of those you couldn't even figure out what they were about, and of the remaining, only a couple might have appealed to you. So if you wanted to spend your allowance on a game, you had a choice between two or three titles, or sometimes no real choice at all. Inevitably you would sometimes end up buying a game that would suck or was incomplete. Still you would spend hours playing it, trying to understand and squeeze fun out of it, because it was all you had.

I have a bittersweet memory of the original Outpost. The game was intriguing, but totally unfinished. I spent so much time trying to figure out some of the concepts, when in fact there was nothing to figure out. The game was simply not doing anything of all the exciting things mentioned in the manual.

Another is lore-filled guides. For the physical copy of Supreme Commander, for example, has a several hundred page book that is 10 pages of instructions, and the rest is flavour text about the background of the three factions as well as the different units in the game.

I miss those, and I miss physical games.

Demos used to be great. Lazy ones were typically the first level or two, much like "shareware" games (Doom being an example of the latter), but great ones were lovingly crafted standalones. Perhaps the best was the Cannon Fodder demo that came with Amiga Power. Entitled "Cannon Soccer", Sensible had put together a Christmas & football themed level that saw your men taking on an army of Sensible Soccer players. The goalkeeper, at the far end of a big open field, had a rocket launcher and line of sight better than yours.

Half Life got a demo, the "Uplink" level. It also had a decent, if brief, manual with some background about Dr Freeman.

Standalone tutorial levels? Again, Half Life is an exemplar- though the Opposing Force one was better, for the scripting. There's few finer lines in a game than the Drill Sergeant bellowing "AS YOU CAN SEE YOU ARE NOT DEAD". Standalone tutorials have the advantage of not getting in the way if you go back for a playthrough.

I miss manuals too. I remember cracking open each new Final Fantasy game and, before I even touched the disc, I pulled out the new manual and read all I could about the characters. Birthdays, blood types, hair, age, a mini bio. I ate that stuff up because it built up the world.

I can't remember what game it was, but I do remember the first time I opened up a game, pulled out the manual, and it was four pages, three of which were warnings about health, how to hook up the PS3, and warranty junk. The other page was the control scheme. And I remember thinking, "Wow, this thing is pathetic. Why would they do this?" and being really disappointed.
Now though, most of the time all you get is a single piece of paper. So sad.

Scarim Coral:
Err using the cheat code on here didn't work on here (I was using the arrow keys near the numbers locks)...

Also you missed out those booklets of cheats on mang games that gaming magazine sometime come as freebies but I suppose they are similar to those cheat hotlines. Also those preview dvds like from E3 were neat too before the rise of broadbands.

Make sure Num Lock is off. Also, remember to press Enter at the end.

I remember when "arcade-perfect port" was the gold standard of console games. The first instance of this for me was the SNES port of Street Fighter 2; I still remember going with my friend from high school to the mall to get it, being excited all the way back about playing it... and then realizing he'd forgotten the key to his house, leaving us waiting two more hours until his parents got home. But it was totally worth it!

The second experience I had was with the Dreamcast port of Soulcalibur. In fact, I recall it actually being a bit better than its arcade source.

Barbas:
Make sure Num Lock is off. Also, remember to press Enter at the end.

*inputs code*

0_o

The website designers are weird.

LordLundar:
*inputs code*

0_o

The website designers are weird.

They are like a big bowl of candy that's nutty on the outside but sweet in the middle. They can even get kind of gooey.

Gods, I'm so hungry.

OT: I remember getting my first and only Nintendo 64. Build to last back then, they were - welded rather than riveted, and any problem solvable with a solid tap in the right place. Ah, they don't make 'em like that no more, tovarischi.

I connect with all of those except gaming hotlines, my parents would have killed me if I was caught calling one of those (not that I would, I was a stubborn kid, I either beat it myself of not at all)

I miss real arcades, my aunt used to take me to one every week and it was great, but now arcades are mostly irrelevant now (except in Japan, where they are still going strong)

I also miss colourful instruction manuals, many of them were boring and mostly pointless, but I remember loving the old Zelda ones for SNES, the artwork was charming it was fun to flip through.

I also remember the jump from FFIX to FFX, the jump left me and my sister speechless (even my parents where impressed and watched us play it for nearly 6 hours, that was a great Christmas)

I miss old PC game boxes.

The big, cardboard ones, that look imposing on a shelf.
And had big, heavy manuals. (and often, because of what old games were like, a dozen disks)

I had a whole bunch, but an accident while moving (I move a lot, and things tend to get lost along the way unfortunately) has cost me most of them.

I still have manuals, thanks to a quirk of what I did, but not the boxes.
There are still a few boxes in my collection from the early 2000's.

Interesting to think these still survived into the new millenium, but... Standardised DVD cases did eventually kill them off.
Pity.

DOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGSDOGS

Come to Nickel City! Its in San Jose and you can play Altered Beast and the Nick Fury/Punisher games fo' fwee!
Its my favorite arcade, and they take nickels to play!

p.s. I miss the smell of a brand new instruction booklet...

Tiamat666:
These days you have such a vast choice of games to play, we have probably reached the point where its impossible to play all the great games within a lifetime (especially once you get out of school and get a job). You have to really think about where to spend your time and money, but if you make wise choices, you will always be rewarded with a great game.

Back in the old days you went to a store and they had maybe a collection of 10 games. Half of those you couldn't even figure out what they were about, and of the remaining, only a couple might have appealed to you. So if you wanted to spend your allowance on a game, you had a choice between two or three titles, or sometimes no real choice at all. Inevitably you would sometimes end up buying a game that would suck or was incomplete. Still you would spend hours playing it, trying to understand and squeeze fun out of it, because it was all you had.

I have a bittersweet memory of the original Outpost. The game was intriguing, but totally unfinished. I spent so much time trying to figure out some of the concepts, when in fact there was nothing to figure out. The game was simply not doing anything of all the exciting things mentioned in the manual.

Word. The amount of games available nowadays is a kind of problem--there's no benefit in knowing about great games I'll never have time to play.

You forgot "Good Games". Nah I'm just kidding. Had to be that guy.

Man, anyone remember the giant ass cheat books that had thousands of codes for hundreds of games and a certain percentage of them didn't work because the writers just didn't care to know which game was which?

LegendaryGamer0:
Man, anyone remember the giant ass cheat books that had thousands of codes for hundreds of games and a certain percentage of them didn't work because the writers just didn't care to know which game was which?

Remember? I still have the 7 I bought when I was younger and lacked the games, let alone the console, to try them out...

OT: My cousins have an entire DVD case filled with nothing but PS2 demo disks... and one demo disk got me into the Burnout series...

Other than that, this list makes me feel old...

Oh my, that cheat code...

Didn't get how to do it right (at first), damn near gave me a seizure when it did. Remember when games weren't bundled with seizure warnings? That's another thing they probably won't get to experience; Games that don't run the risk of inducing seizures.

Demos are still kicking around, although mostly as downloads. I bought Fire Emblem: Awakening on the strength of the demo, and it's since become my all time favourite game. The official XBox magazine here in the UK still packs demo disks as well.

There were still a few decent manuals in the last gen. Skyrim even came with a copy of the game's map, which was cool. It's stuck up on my wall.

I think I'll always miss how much you would get surprised by easter eggs, glitches, and cheats in games back then, especially with arcade games.

I remember when Mortal Kombat 2 came out, and the game just had so many little hidden gems, and since this was (mostly) pre-internet, a lot of it was just rumors. You had a friend of a friend who claimed he had unlocked ERMAC, or found a way to play as Kintaro, or whatever, and it became something you would talk about with your friends and try to make happen. Nowadays you just hop on youtube, watch a video of it, and done.

Likewise, I do kinda miss the days when beating a game was actually a pretty big deal. If you had a friend who beat "Battletoads" without cheat codes, that dude was a legend, or played through "Contra" without the 30 life code, he was the man. Nowadays even notably tough games like "Dark Souls" you can still basically just keep throwing yourself at the bad guys over and over and you'll eventually win.

And as someone mentioned, there was something just more fun and exciting about going to the mall with your family and actually buying a PC game in a box, holding onto it, reading the instruction manual on the drive home, and just being really hyped to play it. Now with Steam it's just "click. Game."

I always like bringing this up...

the Konami Code (Up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A, Start)

Signs of an only child/gamer! Not saying it's good or bad either way, but having had 3 siblings to share the console with the Konami code is engraved in me as "B, A, SELECT, Start", which starts the two player game with the cheats.

Also a child hood mystery that will never be solved, when we came to the city (Vancouver) with our mom and went downtown, there were a couple of cool looking arcades that we'd be drawn to and want to go in but... they were "18+ adults only" and we weren't allowed? To this day I have no idea exactly what went on in those establishments to make them 18+.

I was FORBIDDEN by my parents to go to the arcade in my hometown. When I was old enough to go to places by myself, it was removed from the strip mall forever.

I am still not over it.

...

Reentering the Konami code here alleviates it a little though, I was so happy when I found out about that.

Also Demo disks were THE BOMB! That's how I found out about Freelancer and played the shit out of the demo until my Dad bought me the full game. On my old tower, I still have tons of various demos installed. I should boot it up again at some point.

RandV80:

Also a child hood mystery that will never be solved, when we came to the city (Vancouver) with our mom and went downtown, there were a couple of cool looking arcades that we'd be drawn to and want to go in but... they were "18+ adults only" and we weren't allowed? To this day I have no idea exactly what went on in those establishments to make them 18+.

Most likely they had some games with "graphic violence" like N.A.R.C or Mortal Kombat or some other games like that. They probably figured that parents would get angry if the arcade let kids in to watch or play them.

The Nintendo 3DS still releases demos for their games. There were even demos for Ace Attorney and for Pokemon ORAS!

*typed the Konami code*

O_o 7.8/10 too much DOGS

Well... you just described seven things that I'm glad are gone, or at best, don't care at all about; and then went on to glorify some of them into things they never were for me. I'm 41, for what it's worth.

ARCADES though. I certainly do miss those.

Likewise on the love for arcades, although the current (American) incarnations make me sad. You either get the Chuck-E-Cheese experience, or the Dave & Buster experience; either way, you still end up paying $2 per game for an experience that ends all too quickly. Most of the games aren't even all that up-to-date, making them feel like a rip-off. (For example, the same Jurassic Park rail shooter I played 15 years ago for $0.25 a game is still in the same business today, though now at $1.50 a game. That's insane.)

Nostalgia aside, the only real advantage an arcade has is with its unusual control devices. Think shooting games with big plastic guns, racing games with quasi-realistic steering columns, or the variety of rhythm games (dancing, drums, etc.) There's some equivalents on home consoles, but they're rarely up to the same size or quality by necessity of having to fit into most living room entertainment set-ups.

Don't effing forget split-screen. >_> Stripped out for literally no good reason.

I miss those manuals and I also miss the lack of handholding also demos. As a kid with a ps1 I loved reading the manuals also cheat codes now you need to to the indie market to get away from handholding. Also split screen coop

Arnoxthe1:
Don't effing forget split-screen. >_> Stripped out for literally no good reason.

Not to mention multiplayer bots.. still better than screaming 12 year olds any day...

Squilookle:

Arnoxthe1:
Don't effing forget split-screen. >_> Stripped out for literally no good reason.

Not to mention multiplayer bots.. still better than screaming 12 year olds any day...

I love multiplayer bots too but it seems the only game that has them anymore these days is CoD, ironically enough.

Cheat codes

Whether they should truly be missed or not I'm not entirely sure. I certainly do prefer to have them in - they are quite useful at times, and other times just plain fun. I tried to find cheat codes for Heroes 6 because, fuck you Ubisoft and/or Black Hole Entertainment (whoever is responsible) the "balance" in the campaign is complete bullshit. However, there were no cheat codes. I ended up just going for a trainer instead which is a viable alternative to cheat codes. Some times I even whip out Cheat Engine myself and start to much around with a game.

Another good use that comes to mind were the console commands that Half-Life taught me a lot about games in general, and I'm eternally grateful for that (well, I know, even if Quake did it before, as HL was running on the same engine).

Some of the cheat codes even took a life of their own - the Konami code, being one example, but also the likes of the cow level, or "power overwhelming" in Blizzard games.

Overall, though, they were a nice addition, but not entirely necessary - nowadays trainers and other applications can do a pretty serviceable job substituting for them. Again - wether they should truly be missed, is a bit muddy.

A wide selection of gaming magazines

I should start off with saying that I certainly didn't have a great selection of gaming magazines. And the ones I had access to, were a bit shit. Still, given that I had no internet access at the time, they were passable.

However, I don't think I'll really miss them, even if a wider selection were to be available. Due to the ready availability of the Internet nowadays. I can go and find several places to suit my tastes - from general gaming websites such as this one, to some that cater to more specific tastes, say, a given console or a particular genre of games, to some even more targeted like a given game, even down to a specific entry in the series or even a particular aspect of the game. And, frankly, I much prefer those - there is more freedom, they would cater even better to me, and chances are, they'd be less bad than the paper magazines I had to grow up with.

Overall, I don't think magazines are a big loss. Whether it is one, to begin with, would be up for debate as well.

Demo discs

I'm splitting this point into two. So, demo discs. Yeah, fuck those. I've got the power of the Internet now - I've had it for quite a while now. Discs, I can totally get to skip - the disks included with magazines, in particular, were filled with a bunch of crap that, again, filled the Internet shaped hole in many people's lives. They even distributed stuff like free (usually shareware) games, software, and patches for the games. And fuck that patches nonsense - I see people claim it's some sort of a new phenomena to have a game released and then the developers somehow dare release a patch you had to download, perhaps on day one...well, how about you get a game and there is no patch until maybe you go buy the next edition of a gaming magazine in a fortnight. If they bothered to include that patch with it. And in the mean time, the game could literally be unplayable or unwinnable or maybe just unprogressable in some fashion.

Nah, as I said, I've got the Internet now - games, demos, software, patches, mods, whatever - I've got ready access to them. Much bigger, much better selection and I can get them pretty much instantly.

(and demos in general)

OK, demos we certainly don't see as many of these nowadays. And that is a shame - sure stuff like let's plays or an overwhelming amount of reviews exist, but they don't quite manage to convey as much and the same kind of information as a demo can. In fact, I'll bring up Heroes 6 again - I know it may sound a bit odd, but would not have gotten it were it not for the demo. Thanks to it, I managed to see what the game is about which the few reviews I had seen at the time, didn't manage to properly convey.

I do think demos are benefitial to us, the players. I realise they may not necessarily be for the publishers and/or developers but I'm not entirely sure that the we should be serving their needs when they are marketing stuff to us. I don't market stuff works.

Game hint hotlines

Frankly, I never heard of these until now. I don't think they would really "enrich" us either. Probably gets boring but - the Internet. If you're here, you have access to much more, much wider, much better advice for much cheaper. Namely, at the price of free.

Decent instruction manuals

Yeah, I still remember the ones which were actually wrong. Spells of Gold sticks in my mind as a sore thumb - I never managed to find out how to learn spells. I knew spellcasting was in the game (even if the title didn't pretty much explicitly say it), the manual did, in fact, spent a good chapter on spellcasting, but I managed to finish it without ever finding out how do do any of that. I remember reading the manual several times each time growing increasingly more puzzled as to what was it I was missing. It was only after I finished it I managed to find out you had to press Tab while in a temple, to be able to buy spells. Incidentally, I found that in a review on a gaming magazine that complained about this information completely missing. Yeah, that was one "decent" manual, that was. There were others that were wrong, too. I remember some were even outdated - if memory serves, Neverwinter Night was one of these. The descriptions were correct as of the time the game was released but later patches/expansions and accompanying changes to the mechanics made the manual quite inaccurate at places. And some manuals took the worse of both aspects - they were intended to be accurate (as of the relase of the game, at least) but they...weren't - they would reference mechanics that have been changed and tweaked before release. So, they were outdated at the release of the game...which can be equally be interpreted as the manuals being plain wrong not merely being correct at one point in time, because as players, we never experienced that point in time.

Some lore stuff from them was OK to good, some was bad to cringeworthy, though. The manuals were quite a mixed bag - I certainly don't remember them being some sort of always must-to-have and really-high-quality reading. I do think they can be good, but the sheer demand to have them with almost every game, made a sizeable portion of them just a half-assed attempt in order to tick some box in the "To Do List For Releasing".

I say that if a developer wants to make a manual, they should, they would be likely to put some effort into it. If they don't, then they probably shouldn't bother. And if they want to relay the same information in a different way, they are totally free to do that. Might even be encouraged, instead of adhering to a "standard" that may not always be the best for relaying useful information.

A distinct lack of hand-holding

Yeah, I certainly miss that at a somewhat regular basis. The games that insist on educating me on absolute basics do frustrate me - game starts and I am taught that I can look around *gasp* SUCH REVELATION! And I can walk, MUCH SURPRISE!

Yeah, I know the game could be the first one for some, but come on, let's look at this realistically - it wouldn't be for most players. The tutorials should be optional - be they a separate thing you can play, like the Hazard Course in Half-Life, or a togglable option (it's fine to have tutorials on by default). An even better approach is to offer the choice whether to have them in the beginning of the game - Bloodlines was quite brilliant where you were given a choice between playing the tutorial level, which taught you how to move, attack, jump and stuff, covering most of the basics for playing a game in general; being given the basics, which was a brief verbal run down of how stuff works in this game (in-universe-wise) and hence what to do/not do; or completely skipping either of these. Other games have gone with a more boring but practical option that is to when they just go "Here is a tutorial hint - if you don't want to get these, click <whatever>" when the game starts.

So, what I'm trying to say is - yes, tutorials are valuable. But they can also be frustrating for a large portion of the playerbase, as well. And we have the technology, methods, and precedents to have a compromise.

Big graphics jumps

I'm not sure how I feel about this. I mean - yeah big graphics jumps were cool and all but...should we really miss them? Come one, is that really a thing we need? I don't mean better graphics - overall they are a good thing[1] but what I mean is big sudden and infrequent jumps in them. I think that a steady pace is much better - sure you lose some of the "wow" factor when things are suddenly upgraded, but surely, having things looking better all the time should offset that, right?

I don't really think this is something to really miss.

Real arcades

Meh, whatever. They were OK but also not really that awesome. Sure, I've spent quite a few hours in arcades. Some of these hours I've even played on them. But so what? I've also spent quite a few hours catching spiders and pitting them against each other in fights to the death. And I've also spent quite a few hours doing other stuff that amused me when I was a kid, but not as much nowadays. I was easily amused as a child. I'm pretty sure most youngsters are.

Anyway, back to arcades - they are gone, and with somewhat of a good reason - they aren't really that good. Well, not compared to the alternatives for gaming that surpassed them. After all, they wouldn't have been surpassed, were that not the case. Should we really miss something that just became obsolete? Living in caves and risking your life for food was all the rage back in the day, but I don't really think we miss that by and large. At a different point in time, attaching leeches to the body was a medicine practice that was...well, used. Do we yearn to go back to it? OK, maybe these examples are slightly on the negative side, but some stuff was simply replaced with better things - cassettes were replaced with CDs and later MP3s, for a more practical example. Sure, one could remember fondly the times they had to rewind the tape, sometimes by hand, but there isn't a really big rush on buying cassette players, which suggests they aren't really that missed.

Arcades had their time, but it passed. Eh, whatever - another note in the history books. Yearning for them strikes me as being bit of overly romantic.

[1] even then, I personally feel we don't need them that much. Improvements are good, just not the be all and end all - we can slow down the pace.

 

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