The Fallout 4 Intro Is A Mess

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The Fallout 4 Intro Is A Mess

I love Fallout 4. What's interesting is that I was completely irritated at the start. The first big fight had me rolling my eyes, sighing heavily, and - by the end - gritting my teeth.

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I'd recommend Bethesda needs to bring back the Hawkhaven way of presentation, where the game experience and mechanics are compressed and summarized into a single location that you can't explore unless accessed via console commands, whereas the experience and gains are more drawn out in the actual game.

...Then again it would be better if E3 and other expos/cons strongly suggest that publishers do not force development teams into an often-short timeline to create a demo for their event.

That isn't the intro I have problems swallowing. If you get his relationship high enough you get an idea of why he acted the way he did towards you. The intro I have trouble swallowing is the moment you leave the vault and meet this world and these people. No shell shock? No taking a "me" day to curl up in a fetal position and cry? Your character should be a raving lunatic instead of the calm, cool, collected, one we get. Afterall they just went from "Leave it to Beaver" to "Mad Max" in 2.5 seconds. Even the military training I assume they had (fatigues in the closet) can't really explain how well together they are holding it.

The previous part was a mess. It would have been nice to get to meet your neighbours before the nukes, because that way you would feel sad by seeing their skeletons 200 years later. Fallout 3 intro was brilliant with you growing up in the vault and getting to know the game mechanics in a natural way. You also had alternate paths to try and the moment you left the vault was one of the best set-pieces in gaming ever.

In Fallout 4 everything feels... rushed.

I hate preston because he's black super bland. He has no personality to speak of. Not to mention his default weapon sucks. A laser musket is powerful when you crank it up 6 times. He only cranks it once when he fires, which does pitiful damage on top of being super slow. If you want to conserve ammo by letting your companion use their own weapon, don't use preston. His max affinity perk is really good though, so once you max him out, dismiss him and never use him again.

My distinct impression of that first mission in Concord is that it is essentially a way to hook newcomers to the series by showing off the cool toys and letting the player experience some really cool stuff first hand. Yes, for those of us who are long time Fallout-fans it feels grating to meet a generous Goody Two-Shoes, get a Minigun, a Power Armor and a SPECIAL Booblehead and face of against a Deathclaw, all within the first hour of being in the wasteland. But for someone new to the series that will probably be the "Oh Shit! Awesome!"-moment that will keep them playing more instead of putting the game away after having fought five raiders with some shitty pipe pistol as the climax of their first quest.

Preston Garvey is immortal. He's transcended the squabbles of humanity like Superman in All Star Superman. He's not supposed to be like the rest of us. Where a normal man may go crazy, Superman perseveres and remains a symbol of goodness.
Source: I shot him like 20 times in the head consecutively then proceeded to have a casual conversation with him so I can confirm.

I kind of had more issues with what comes before that part, but I understand your points all the same.

Also, my only issues that I shared with you were the ones about Preston bing kind of bland but not offensively so. The deathclaw battle was pretty bad though. I actually missed it's entrance because there were still some raiders around and it went after them first. I finished off the raiders and found the deathclaw stuck in a hole. Shooting fish in a barrel after that. ;p

However, I actually got to Preston after not only finding my own power armor, but I also killed another group a raiders and took the leader's mini-gun after she was dead. So while it wasn't intended that way, I came to the fight ready to kick butt.

Still, it is still WAY easier to get power armor than before.
On the other side though, never found and enemy that could one shot me dead when in full power armor in the other Fallout games I've played, so it's not like they made power armor a guarantee to victory.

"1. The deathclaw gets no build-up. Deathclaws are one of the signature bad guys of the franchise and one of the most memorable parts of the first game. This has nothing to do with the monster design and everything to do with how the monster was introduced.

In the first game, you begin hearing rumors of deathclaws long before you encounter them. They're blamed for various attacks and you hear spooky stories about how fearsome and powerful they are. People are terrified of the name, and you can't tell which rumors - if any - are actually true. Your quest drags you into a cave to confront one, and even though it was a turn-based game with simple 2D sprites, that confrontation was a thousand times more thrilling than the surprise deathclaw in Fallout 4."

This. So much this. Great job Shamus.

This is what I love to happen in such games. For example the bloodsuckers, the Monolith and snorks from STALKER all had this legendary buildup that was given to the player little by little IF they payed attention. This meant that the first time fighting these monsters or insane men, it felt special. Horrific, yet special. All those legends, murmurs and stories coming to life to face you.

And not only did you remind me of that, you also reminded me of how awesome it was in Fallout 1... damn... thanks!

Preston also seems oddly accepting when you tell him you lived in the neighborhood 200 years ago when the nukes hit. Instead of questoning the sanity of this stranger, he just reacts like it's just one of those things.

Yeah, bit of a weird showpiece there. In fact, with the exception of a few buildings you can enter, the town of Concord feels like it was built primarily for that demoing purposes rather than as a stepping stone to Lexington and Diamond City.

EDIT: And jeez, don't blow a deathclaw that early. Not even a severely injured and loping one. Speaking of which, though, blowing its leg off was a satisfying remedy.

The thing about the whole Fallout series, to me, is that there's almost no connecting thread in between games. There's a common visual aesthetic and recurring imagery (Vaults, Vault Boy, The Brotherhood of Steel, the Power Armor, post-nuclear wastelands), but what is the overall theme of the whole thing? How do I explain it to people who didn't play one before, or get back into it since #3?

I can see where this article is coming from. And as someone who has played all the fallout's I do agree that the first mission in concord takes a lot of the high end stuff in the universe and hands it to you right off the bat. It's a nice slice of gameplay but it's also very shallow, hell, the main story itself starts off pretty shallow, and I was worried it was going to end up like Fallout 3 with a linear main story with the factions merely being the good brotherhood versus the evil institute.

[spoiler] Then the Prydwen shows up like a boss, the BoS starts spouting some very genocidal propaganda, and the Institute and railroad start making cases for why we should give the brotherhood the giant middle finger and suddenly you actually start getting New Vegas style faction quests. Suffice to say, the main story ends up much closer to NV than 3, although no faction nearly as bleak as the Legion, every faction hovers around a grey morality centered around the question of what to do about synths and advancing the Sci-fi technology of the setting. The brotherhood going back to being technology zealots hell bent on saving mankind from itself, and picking up the enclave's mad hardon for killing mutants and non-humans, there's even a conversation about the old BoS from 3 being weak and turning away from their true cause.Not quite as good as NV, limited in its role-playing by the fact that your looking for your son, and a dialogue system that doesn't let you go straight up dark like a legion playthrough of NV, still, I would call it an overall refreshing step up from 3's lackluster story. [\spoiler]

I do agree with squid that the character's lack of reaction to being 200 years in the future is kind of lame, although codsworth is a good companion for making comments about all the differences between time periods. This is even truer for female characters, the male is a former soldier, but my female avatar stomping around with mini guns and power armor apparently was a lawyer before the war.

Still, like shamus said, the rest of the story manages to do a pretty good job after kind of blowing its load in the first mission, deathclaw's are still threatening, but there's bigger monsters out there now that fill the role of being the ominous reveal. The power armor and minigun eventually become useable again, but I was around level 15 before I could break out the armor for more than single encounters, and it was a while before I encountered enough 5mm ammo to use the minigun for more than 2 seconds before running dry, the minigun itself isn't even all that great a weapon without a few upgrades anyway, and it took getting a legendary minigun before I even bothered to clear enough space in my inventory to lug the ridiculously overweight thing around with me, it's a lackluster weapon without the associated heavy weapons perks, you get a lot more bang for your buck out of an upgraded combat rifle for less than half the weight.

Darth_Payn:
The thing about the whole Fallout series, to me, is that there's almost no connecting thread in between games. There's a common visual aesthetic and recurring imagery (Vaults, Vault Boy, The Brotherhood of Steel, the Power Armor, post-nuclear wastelands), but what is the overall theme of the whole thing? How do I explain it to people who didn't play one before, or get back into it since #3?

I'm not sure what you mean by "theme" here? Wouldn't it be "War Never Changes"?

Just kidding there, but if I were explaining the Fallout series, I would probably say something along the lines of "it's a series of RPGs that take place in different parts of a post-apocalyptic America that never got over the 1950s."

Hmm, maybe this is Bethesda's new strategy. Make the intro sequence so shockingly lame that it utterly shatters your expectations. Then, if you scarred psyche and insulted intelligence manages to pull through, it is so devastated that any plot presented to it, no matter how mediocre, is perceived as if George RR Martin wrote it.

Nice going Bethesda!

While I was shocked that we got power armor, a minigun and fought a deathclaw so early, I can see how it all worked out. The power armor hangs in my shed while I go out and fight. It's a cool thing to have but its not new. It is something that will be really cool when I get it upgraded. The deathclaw is something longtime fans have seen over and over, so while the fight was really underwhelming, the game has much newer and more interesting threats to throw at us later on, including new versions of our old favorite monster.

What's more, one of my biggest complaints about things like miniguns, the fat man and power armor in the previous games was this: by the time you get them, you don't need them. Yes, getting power armor in 3 and FNV was cool, but by the time I had it I could kill anything and everything without much of a sneeze anyway. By giving us these items early in the game, we can rely on them to help us through really tough spots, making them seem super valuable. Which would be bad if they were just a crutch, but they now have inherent limitations that keep them from being an auto-win and are upgradeable to keep them useful throughout the game. This is waaaay better than finding them later on and going, "Neat, guess I'll go toss this in the bin with teh other really cool but totally unnecessary crap I have."

Gorrath:
While I was shocked that we got power armor, a minigun and fought a deathclaw so early, I can see how it all worked out. The power armor hangs in my shed while I go out and fight. It's a cool thing to have but its not new. It is something that will be really cool when I get it upgraded. The deathclaw is something longtime fans have seen over and over, so while the fight was really underwhelming, the game has much newer and more interesting threats to throw at us later on, including new versions of our old favorite monster.

What's more, one of my biggest complaints about things like miniguns, the fat man and power armor in the previous games was this: by the time you get them, you don't need them. Yes, getting power armor in 3 and FNV was cool, but by the time I had it I could kill anything and everything without much of a sneeze anyway. By giving us these items early in the game, we can rely on them to help us through really tough spots, making them seem super valuable. Which would be bad if they were just a crutch, but they now have inherent limitations that keep them from being an auto-win and are upgradeable to keep them useful throughout the game. This is waaaay better than finding them later on and going, "Neat, guess I'll go toss this in the bin with teh other really cool but totally unnecessary crap I have."

That's actually a major problem with anything involving progression. The endgame gives you awesome stuff... which you either don't need anymore and on top of not needing is also very hard to use (either due to to ammo concerns or accidental suicide), but there's also nothing to actually use it ON, because you're 5 seconds from the final boss and you've already genocided the entire world, barring the level 1 respawning mobs that you can annihilate faster than a particle cannon.

Jack Action:

Gorrath:
While I was shocked that we got power armor, a minigun and fought a deathclaw so early, I can see how it all worked out. The power armor hangs in my shed while I go out and fight. It's a cool thing to have but its not new. It is something that will be really cool when I get it upgraded. The deathclaw is something longtime fans have seen over and over, so while the fight was really underwhelming, the game has much newer and more interesting threats to throw at us later on, including new versions of our old favorite monster.

What's more, one of my biggest complaints about things like miniguns, the fat man and power armor in the previous games was this: by the time you get them, you don't need them. Yes, getting power armor in 3 and FNV was cool, but by the time I had it I could kill anything and everything without much of a sneeze anyway. By giving us these items early in the game, we can rely on them to help us through really tough spots, making them seem super valuable. Which would be bad if they were just a crutch, but they now have inherent limitations that keep them from being an auto-win and are upgradeable to keep them useful throughout the game. This is waaaay better than finding them later on and going, "Neat, guess I'll go toss this in the bin with teh other really cool but totally unnecessary crap I have."

That's actually a major problem with anything involving progression. The endgame gives you awesome stuff... which you either don't need anymore and on top of not needing is also very hard to use (either due to to ammo concerns or accidental suicide), but there's also nothing to actually use it ON, because you're 5 seconds from the final boss and you've already genocided the entire world, barring the level 1 respawning mobs that you can annihilate faster than a particle cannon.

Quite! When I got the fat man in NV, the only thing I ever used it for was quicksaving at the strip and using it to see how far I could make all the bodies fly before I got bored and reloaded my save. There is enough of a drawback to teh fatman where, even if you had it early, you couldn't just lob rounds at every radroach you stumble across. Which ironically, is pretty much exactly what you end up doing with it late game anyway since you don't actually need it to kill anything.

I think Fallout 4 has solved this issue rather well! I get the cool stuff, can actually make use of it and can keep it upgraded so it remains useful throughout but can't overuse it because of its inherent limitations. I'm not sure a better solution could have been had.

While I have to agree with all the points you made with that tepid opening of a mission; when you said intro I at first thought you meant the entire vault section which I believe commits far more egregious crimes. First off, I think some perspective is in order. When FO4 was first announced at E3 we got to see start of it all. How you lived before the bombs going off and suddenly thrust into a world far past your time and hopelessly alone. Now this sets up some interesting mysteries that basically Bethesda all end up choking on such as, how could 200 years have passed, why are they the sole survivor, will his past play a role in events to come, and how does the character not know what happened to them? Oh such a treasure trove of mysteries waiting to be unwrapped... Well until they give you all the answers in a matter of minutes.

Once you enter the vault you are lead down a narrow corridor and are quickly told to get in the freezer tube- Wait, that's it?! Are you joking Bethesda? Any moron with half a brain cell could have come up with cryogenic freezing and yet you jumped at the chance to make this the plot device. I even asked my friend how he thought 200 years had passed in the vault since he didn't own the game or watch any streams and he even said freezing as his first answer. Even such a simple basic premise is ruined when you exit your tube and the very first terminal you see explains the entire purpose of the vault spoiling any tension the audience had left surrounding the nature of the vault. However it gets even more absurd when you realize the purpose of 111 is to suspend people in cryo without their knowledge. Now stop right there, you can not expect me to swallow that garbage. What kind of person plays this game for the first time and doesn't know exactly what that machine is, you even see frost seeping out of the machine! And of course your character is completely oblivious to all of this with no option to call them out (Is it just me or is the sole survivor incredibly dense throughout the whole game?). Of course I didn't even mention the kidnapping being rushed as heck as the character is left alive to their own devices, but I won't go into that. After fighting the obligatory rad roaches and finding a convent pip boy you are off into the wastes.

Thematically speaking I want to talking about FO3 and really explain why it's intro felt so complete. Now FO3 was my first fallout game as I assume it was for most people and do you know where you start off as, a baby. This was a clear design choice to put you in the place of someone who knew absolutely nothing and slowly acclimatize you to everything. You grew up in the vault learning all it's ins and outs, you live with the everyone else forming relationships and caring about them, and when it's all taken away and you leave the vault only to be confronted by that blinding light shining on the empty wasteland it fills you with so much emotions all at once. In FO4 the vault is simply a tutorial and plot device, nothing more, nothing less. FO4 takes absolutely nothing away from it's predecessor and just shoves you along as if it knows you have better things to do than listen to same lame brain "story" naaaah you just want to explore like everyone else! It's a shame that a wonderful game like FO4 has to get bogged down with another awful Bethesda opening *See Extra Credit's "Skyrim's Opening - How NOT to Start a Game"* and fails to capitalize on the wonders of mystery and exploration that previous Fallout games always do right from the start.

Gorrath:

Quite! When I got the fat man in NV, the only thing I ever used it for was quicksaving at the strip and using it to see how far I could make all the bodies fly before I got bored and reloaded my save. There is enough of a drawback to teh fatman where, even if you had it early, you couldn't just lob rounds at every radroach you stumble across. Which ironically, is pretty much exactly what you end up doing with it late game anyway since you don't actually need it to kill anything.

I think Fallout 4 has solved this issue rather well! I get the cool stuff, can actually make use of it and can keep it upgraded so it remains useful throughout but can't overuse it because of its inherent limitations. I'm not sure a better solution could have been had.

Maybe I'll have to wait and play it for myself, Warmaster, but it just seems like a re-naming of the whole thing; I mean, is there anything to use the endgame PA upgrades on?

squid5580:
That isn't the intro I have problems swallowing. If you get his relationship high enough you get an idea of why he acted the way he did towards you. The intro I have trouble swallowing is the moment you leave the vault and meet this world and these people. No shell shock? No taking a "me" day to curl up in a fetal position and cry? Your character should be a raving lunatic instead of the calm, cool, collected, one we get. Afterall they just went from "Leave it to Beaver" to "Mad Max" in 2.5 seconds. Even the military training I assume they had (fatigues in the closet) can't really explain how well together they are holding it.

Player Character really should have had a stronger reaction. If I woke up and saw my home, my city nuked and nothing but a wasteland crawling with giant bugs, I'd probably just fall to my knees and either cry or go catatonic for a bit. Hell, the robot had a stronger reaction than you do!

PC is honestly the biggest problem. They clearly have a story to them, they have an established back-story, but their personality is incredibly bland and the voice actors aren't helping.

I love this article. Its the best .3. Helps say why I don't like the first real quest

squid5580:
That isn't the intro I have problems swallowing. If you get his relationship high enough you get an idea of why he acted the way he did towards you. The intro I have trouble swallowing is the moment you leave the vault and meet this world and these people. No shell shock? No taking a "me" day to curl up in a fetal position and cry? Your character should be a raving lunatic instead of the calm, cool, collected, one we get. Afterall they just went from "Leave it to Beaver" to "Mad Max" in 2.5 seconds. Even the military training I assume they had (fatigues in the closet) can't really explain how well together they are holding it.

A popular theory that's floating around is that the MC is broken on the inside and that's why they always speak in such short brief sentences and doesn't really show any emotion outside of things that relate directly to them. Course that's just a theory and Bethesda doesn't really do anything with it. Still, food for thought.

I don't mind Mr. Minuteman that much, (Although the organization as a whole feels like it's playing the over glorifying of America that Fallout usually satirizes a little too straight. That and the Minutemen come off as a little too much Dudley Doright. I mean by all means have an organization dedicated to defending the populace but make them a little freaking rough around the edges) but the Deathclaw and Power Armor? Yeah...that should've been a mid game thing.

I liked the Concord bit a lot, but that's probably because I passed the speech check with Mama Murphy and knew the Deathclaw would show up, and having played Fallout 1, 2, 3, and New Vegas I know just what I'm getting with a Deathclaw. So when I donned that Power Armour and grabbed the minigun I knew what I was getting into and the excitement built up in my head.

Of course, for a newcomer to the Fallout series I could see how the introduction to a deathclaw couldn't measure up to other games. To a player that either didn't do the speech check or doesn't approve of getting the good toys so early I can see how the scene would be a complete misstep. I thought Fallout 4 struck a good balance between giving you the cool armour and gun early on and limiting you from using them. I killed the raiders and deathclaw, accompanied the survivors back to Sanctuary Hills, and hung up the armour because it'd never last for my journey to Boston. I didn't mind that at all, I'd had a taste of Power Armour, I was impressed, but I couldn't just use it forever from that point.

Preston is completely boring though. I took Dogmeat with me after dropping everyone off at Sanctuary Hills and left Preston behind. He was never a character that particularly interested me. He suffers from Jacob Taylor (ME2) syndrome, being a strong, black, dutiful soldier whose always nice to the player character but in the most sterile way possible. Their main purpose to introduce the player to an important organisation they need to know about and provide assistance in combat in the early stages of the game before they're dropped basically forever when someone the fans much prefer comes around. See Garrus and Dogmeat for this much preferred companion.

I agree with the intro being shaky at best. Definitely one of the weaker, if not the weakest, starts to a Bethesda game (Morrowind's first hour, in spite of peoples' nostalgia for it was pretty rough). The first 3 or so hours of FO4 were really making me worried. It just wasn't clicking for me, and as a fan of Bethesda games for a decade now that's a problem. The beginning was far too rushed to the emotional beats the story needed at a specific rhythm for the actions happening around your character to feel like they matter and compel the player, especially with the clear focus of a more personal character based narrative with the added voice acting. The Minutemen situation feels a bit forced (but maybe that's because it was the main scenario showed off in all the prerelease gameplay) and the town-building is thrown in your face with virtually no helpful explanation on its various mechanics.

However, after about 5 hours, it all started to click together with the world building, setting, and gameplay. The "this is you literal sandbox" tone that Bethesda tries to set finally came together and I started having a LOT more fun.

I guess I'm lucky because I've had no issues that were any worse on a technical level than the Witcher 3 (my GOTY) on PS4 at least. The only HARD bug I've discovered (and "fixed") was equipping the

and trying to get a facial reconstruction would hard crash every time I tried it. Unequipping it fixed the problem.

I'm absolutely loving the game though after almost 60 hours in, completed the main questline, and don't see myself stopping anytime soon. Might tie with Bloodborne as my runner-up this year, I'll just have to wait and see.

In Fallout 4 everything feels... rushed.

Yup kinda the point, and what was the one thing that everyone who played Fallout 3 did, they kept a save of the moment they left the Vault so that when they came to replay the game they didn't need to replay the entire, boring Vault part of it, they could jump straight in set up a new character and get right out to the waste land.

I have no issue with the Fallout 4 start, it's quicker, than 3's it gets the player in to the meat of the game while hinging a better reason for your adventure than Fallout 3. The Deathclaw and it's removal as some mythical boogie monster to be worked up to and feared hinges on the player attaching any level of importance to the Deathclaw monster, I would imagine a lot of players are like me their first intro to Fallout was Fallout 3, which means that Deathclaws were just a tough enemy to fight once you levelled up, they were not very rare and popped up often enough to be nothing more than just another bad guy to kill.

The importance of the Power armour and the Death claw comes down to how important the player sees them. Like I said F3 was my intro which means Deathclaws were just a nuisance, nothing special just a pain to fight and the Power Armour got ignored in favour of going for Stealth based armours, infact the early intro to the Power Armour in F4 means I have used it more than I would normally.

I thought this was going to be about the very start of the game.

"Here is you family. You will see them for five minutes."
"You love them. Because we say you do."
"Oh no! Kidnapped! You care! Because we say you do!"
"Go fetch!"

I realise they were just trying to hurry up and get to the wasteland walkabouts that players are actually there for, but that still felt like a encapsulated sample of everything wrong with storytelling in games.

Zhukov:
I thought this was going to be about the very start of the game.

"Here is you family. You will see them for five minutes."
"You love them. Because we say you do."
"Oh no! Kidnapped! You care! Because we say you do!"
"Go fetch!"

I realise they were just trying to hurry up and get to the wasteland walkabouts that players are actually there for, but that still felt like a encapsulated sample of everything wrong with storytelling in games.

I was a bit eh on the whole way your character had a life before you get to even make your character. Doesn't that kinda limit the whole role playing thing? Telling the story of a parent saving a son can be a perfectly solid basis for a story but uhh, say you want to play an antisocial sociopath? Well he had a happy wife and kid already, good luck fitting that into his backstory. Maybe his whole 200 years thing broke him or something, I dunno. NV's plot made the most sense, you have zero relevant backstory and it works perfectly.

I just wrote off the whole "find your son" main plot as the kinda logical opposite to Fallout 3's plot. First you find your dad, now you find your son. I mean it's not terrible and I got more into it later but... it's a problematic story for an RPG for sure.

OT: Nice article, I never noticed how cheap the Deathclaw was actually. Since i've played Fallout 3 and New Vegas, I saw the Deathclaw and I was automatically like "oh shit this is gonna be bad" but Fallout 4 itself gives you nothing. Also even as I am now at lvl 26 or so, the same thing happens. Power Armour + Minigun = dead Deathclaw. I keep the Minigun around for exclusive use on Deathclaws though, so it has that going for it maybe.

Why are there so many suits of Power Armour around anyway? I think the original Armour should just broken after you were done with the quest you get it, it was a Brotherhood model right? Make an excuse that its failsafe measure kicked in and made it unusable. You have the experience that the thing is fucking OP so when the quest for the Brotherhood says "if you do well enough we'll give you Power Armour" my response isn't "sorry I have two suits of the stuff already, top kek"

I ditched the whole Minutemen thing day one and I use only CURIE and recently Cait, since maxing out CURIE's Social Link relationship quest thing downgrades her (in my opinion.) Dunno why you're allowed only one party member though, NV gave you two. One humanoid, one robot/animal. Suppose they wanted to avoid potential problems of having three dudes in Power Armour teabagging Assaultrons and Deathclaws?

Man, Obsidian out-Fallout'd Bethesda so hard with New Vegas... I loved that game.

I hate Preston Garvey. Anytime I go anywhere near him he dumps a bunch of boring and mundane quests in my journal. (Some of them are repeats of quests I already did for him, just in a different location.)

I hate the radiant quest system with a passion.

I keep hearing that people have problems finding fusion cores for their power armor.

Im running around with 30+ fusion cores on me and pretty much wear the power armor all the time... i find fusion cores everywhere. Be it in generators or vendors or ammo boxes.

And thanks to grab n deliver quests that you get from the brotherhood (blood samples and technical manuals) you have more then enough cash to buy them. Just go out into the wasteland and kill a bunch of critters... deliver and buy a fusion core or two from the BOS merchant.

I have more problems getting enough alunimum to upgrade my power armor then anything else.

Also the power armor you can find in the game is tiered in nature wich is another missed oportunity. Your starting power armor is better then raider power armor (wich is just metal welded onto a frame) wich then gets trumped by the BOS power armor or other PA armor parts you can find randomly... not only better in some statistics but completly outranking.

This makes mixing the parts up rather useless and the variety only seems interesting till you got the "best" parts

I'm just curious here as to what difficulty yall are playing at, because I do not recognize these complaints from my own experience on survival.

The way I experienced this whole start was more along the lines of the game showing you what you could expect later on. Like "here is a power armor, it is very powerful with a minigun but you have to fuel it, repair it and have enough ammo to use it so you can't use it all the time or at all until later." And the Deathclaw fight was actually quite scary as I was not prepared for it and it took just about everything I had to bring it down. After that all I could think was "Oh shit, if I meet one of these in the whid I'm fucked." as it tore through the power armor with ease and laughed at my minigun.

it's funny I probably would have preferred the game be more like the intro...ie: tighter narrative and more linear but....well that's me I'm a story nut

my issue with Preston was similar, but more for the fact that I've never liked the way Bethesda approaches story...in that its all just window dressing to serve a function

preston was [HELLO I AM GENERIC GOOD GUY] that you'll inevitably find in every game like this, and another situation is [HELLO I AM UNSURPSING MORAL CHOICE] ect ect

that said though while Fallout 4 is no Bioware game it certainly improves on quite a few things (THUS FAR, not far no spoilers), I would like to be able to just kick back and have back and fourth conversations with my companions (ie Piper the ship that shipped itself before I even knew she existed) but you know this will have to do

though it does reminds me of how New Vegas just BEGGED to have a system like this...give Obsidian a go and it would be perfect

The Wykydtron:

I was a bit eh on the whole way your character had a life before you get to even make your character. Doesn't that kinda limit the whole role playing thing? Telling the story of a parent saving a son can be a perfectly solid basis for a story but uhh, say you want to play an antisocial sociopath?.

I think its entirely plausible you could go Mad after everything that happens...particually if you were the husband, a weary veteran

Zhukov:
I thought this was going to be about the very start of the game.

"Here is you family. You will see them for five minutes."
"You love them. Because we say you do."
"Oh no! Kidnapped! You care! Because we say you do!"
"Go fetch!"

I realise they were just trying to hurry up and get to the wasteland walkabouts that players are actually there for, but that still felt like a encapsulated sample of everything wrong with storytelling in games.

that's probably true for most part, but I can work with it because I care for my charachter, so therefore that's what motivates me in the story because SHE is sad cause her baby is gone...hell I can even work around the hetero marrage

head-cannon is one hell of a drug

Having finished the story, I can say it was really disappointing. More disappointing than what I expected.

I can't even really remember any side quests. Nothing that really gripped me at any rate. Suffered from the Skyrim Radiant Quest issue. Thanks to the dialogue wheel, bland writing and the SHEER DIFFICULTY OF ACTUALLY TRIGGERING DIALOGUE, for me the game just went downhill from the opening. When a Fallout game makes me not want to talk to people, something went terribly wrong.

I think the most fun I had was going into random places and looking around.

Vault101:
that's probably true for most part, but I can work with it because I care for my charachter, so therefore that's what motivates me in the story because SHE is sad cause her baby is gone...hell I can even work around the hetero marrage

head-cannon is one hell of a drug

Yeah, I must say I don't really 'get' it when people say they're having difficulty RP-ing in FO4, due to the established back-story.

My character was a bored 1950's housewife who longed to get out and do something with her life. Now she can actually live out her fantasies, of popping raider heads, lording over settlements, and having same-sex relationships.

Her shackles have finally come off.

Jack Action:

Gorrath:

Quite! When I got the fat man in NV, the only thing I ever used it for was quicksaving at the strip and using it to see how far I could make all the bodies fly before I got bored and reloaded my save. There is enough of a drawback to teh fatman where, even if you had it early, you couldn't just lob rounds at every radroach you stumble across. Which ironically, is pretty much exactly what you end up doing with it late game anyway since you don't actually need it to kill anything.

I think Fallout 4 has solved this issue rather well! I get the cool stuff, can actually make use of it and can keep it upgraded so it remains useful throughout but can't overuse it because of its inherent limitations. I'm not sure a better solution could have been had.

Maybe I'll have to wait and play it for myself, Warmaster, but it just seems like a re-naming of the whole thing; I mean, is there anything to use the endgame PA upgrades on?

I no where near endgame myself so I can't say for certain but some of the upgrades are useful in their own right, like the jet pack and auto-stimpack. Even if I can murder everything in two seconds by end game, not having to go to my inventory to use stimpacks and beng able to fly around while I melt faces is going to be fun regardless. The radiation resistance and jetpack will help with exploration later on as well.

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