Cowboy Bebop - Whatever Happens, Happens.

Cowboy Bebop - Whatever Happens, Happens.

Cowboy Bebop is an artistic masterpiece that, despite its age, still holds up.

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Hayden_Russell:
Cowboy Bebop - Whatever Happens, Happens.

Cowboy Bebop is an artistic masterpiece that, despite its age, still holds up.

Read Full Article

I'm sorry to say but having quite recently seen the Bebop anime I would like to point out that whilst the dubs voices are appropriate the sound mix is way off and the lines tend to be off and there are occasions where there is sound/lines in the original anime where there is nothing here and the other way around.

I reckon it will always hold up (what part of it could have possibly deteriorated?), but artistic masterpiece? It's good, but it feels incredibly rushed at certain moments (including important parts), and while most of the short story's were interesting, they never expanded on anything. At least, I can't remember any at all.

Every year I see a thread or 2 based on Cowboy Bebop on here, but what about that other space western drama, Outlaw Star? Does that rank close to CB at all?

Nazulu:

Every year I see a thread or 2 based on Cowboy Bebop on here, but what about that other space western drama, Outlaw Star? Does that rank close to CB at all?

I assume you've seen it?
If not, then I'd say it's not as good, but just as entertaining. It's definitely worth watching, but then again I pretty much swear to older anime.

For a more realistic and political space drama, there's Legend of The Galactic Heroes (which is apparently being remade for 2017). It has a much slower pace, but centers around politics, tactics, classical heroes, philosophy and epic space battles which puts pretty much all other space battles to shame, in sheer scale.

Cowboy Bebop, summarized: Here's an introductory story where someone is really really good at something, and here's the rest of the series where they're almost entirely useless at it.

I mean, I get that they're trying to show a sort of hierarchy, but to me the whole thing came off as one big Worf Effect. Except it's not one character, it's most of them.

Smilomaniac:

Nazulu:

Every year I see a thread or 2 based on Cowboy Bebop on here, but what about that other space western drama, Outlaw Star? Does that rank close to CB at all?

I assume you've seen it?
If not, then I'd say it's not as good, but just as entertaining. It's definitely worth watching, but then again I pretty much swear to older anime.

For a more realistic and political space drama, there's Legend of The Galactic Heroes (which is apparently being remade for 2017). It has a much slower pace, but centers around politics, tactics, classical heroes, philosophy and epic space battles which puts pretty much all other space battles to shame, in sheer scale.

I dunno, does it compete with the original Gunbuster OVA?

On Cowboy Bebop, I love the setting, design of the ships, I guess the overall atmosphere is my favorite part of the show. The CB world doesn't exist purely for telling the story of the main characters, the main characters exist and live organically in a well thought out world that seems to live and breath even after the credits roll. Funny enough the actual story wasn't that interesting to me, but I return to the show again and again for the characters and setting.

Nazulu:
I reckon it will always hold up (what part of it could have possibly deteriorated?), but artistic masterpiece? It's good, but it feels incredibly rushed at certain moments (including important parts), and while most of the short story's were interesting, they never expanded on anything. At least, I can't remember any at all.

Faye, Spike, and Edward get closure to their personal story lines that play out through the series, though Spike clearly gets the most attention regarding the closure of his story with the Syndicate and Cid. Faye gets a couple of episodes in which she goes searching for her past, eventually she gets a hold of a tape that was apparently taken on a class trip she was part of when she was a school girl...don't think she ever finds out anything solid, but she does leave one last time to go live on Earth. It's been years since I've seen the series, but I think she ends up working at the orphanage she grew up in...I could easily be remembering that wrong. :P

As for Ed, she doesn't really get much build-up to her storyline, but I do know she end up finding her real father and staying with him, but I think that just comes out of the blue in one of the last few episodes...there's no real build-up or any reference to it throughtout the series.

Spike, on the other hand, has 4 or 5 episodes dedicated to his story line, and the final two episodes of the series are what finally bring closure to that story.

Point is that while the majority of the episodes are indeed one-offs, there are a few continual stories that are expanded upon as the series progresses. :P

Pyrian:
Cowboy Bebop, summarized: Here's an introductory story where someone is really really good at something, and here's the rest of the series where they're almost entirely useless at it.

I mean, I get that they're trying to show a sort of hierarchy, but to me the whole thing came off as one big Worf Effect. Except it's not one character, it's most of them.

Eh, I wouldn't go that far. Spike's the main character of the show and as such is regarded as the most competent. Similarly, the majority of the episodes revolve around him. But beyond their introductory episodes, each other character gets an episode where it's their time to shine.

Spike? In the first episode, there's this guy taking hyperdrugs that let him defeat whole rooms full of armed guards single-handedly, and Spike defeats him almost contemptuously, just for the challenge. By the, what, second episode he's about on par with Faye, then continues to deteriorate in effectiveness, eventually getting casually smacked around by the hacker's father for no apparent reason whatsoever.

Nazulu:
I reckon it will always hold up (what part of it could have possibly deteriorated?), but artistic masterpiece? It's good, but it feels incredibly rushed at certain moments (including important parts), and while most of the short story's were interesting, they never expanded on anything. At least, I can't remember any at all.

Every year I see a thread or 2 based on Cowboy Bebop on here, but what about that other space western drama, Outlaw Star? Does that rank close to CB at all?

Speaking as someone that loves Outlaw Star, and makes a habit of watching it through every couple of years, I can safely say that, while Outlaw Star is a great show, Cowboy Bebop beats it out in many areas. Admittedly, it's pretty hard to compare them because of the numerous science-fantasy elements present in Outlaw Star, while Cowboy Bebop has a broader tone that seamlessly slips between genres, where Outlaw Star focuses on the adventure and it's progression, with only a few side-episodes.

OT: Cowboy Bebop is definitely one of those shows that will stand the test of time for years to come. If people point to classic shows of their time like Mobile Suit Gundam or the Ghost in the Shell movie, Cowboy Bebop will always be the show that I point to when I first started watching anime. The fact that every episode is pretty self-contained left a lasting impression on me and is what has drawn me to other shows that use that same style of story-telling; especially Darker Than Black and Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex.

Even if there are issues with the show itself, there is no anime out there that is void of problems and contradictions, and any that Cowboy Bebop possess are fairly easy to overlook given the show's overall quality.

Pyrian:
Spike? In the first episode, there's this guy taking hyperdrugs that let him defeat whole rooms full of armed guards single-handedly, and Spike defeats him almost contemptuously, just for the challenge. By the, what, second episode he's about on par with Faye, then continues to deteriorate in effectiveness, eventually getting casually smacked around by the hacker's father for no apparent reason whatsoever.

You're forgetting every episode that Spike is the focus, especially any episode that involves the Syndicate.

Ballad of Fallen Angels, he takes out 8 armed dudes from the Syndicate before dueling the most dangerous character in the series to a draw.

Sympathy For the Devil he defeats an immortal being

Waltz For Venus, takes down a dozen armed thugs while protecting a plant.

Toys in the Attic, defeats an alien creature that successfully took out the rest of the crew

Jupiter Jazz, another duel against Vicious

Pierrot le Fau, defeats a nigh-immortal engineered assassin

Real Folk Blues, annihilates the entire Syndicate BY HIMSELF

Losing to Edward's dad was more of a goofy moment than anything else.

RJ 17:

Nazulu:
I reckon it will always hold up (what part of it could have possibly deteriorated?), but artistic masterpiece? It's good, but it feels incredibly rushed at certain moments (including important parts), and while most of the short story's were interesting, they never expanded on anything. At least, I can't remember any at all.

Faye, Spike, and Edward get closure to their personal story lines that play out through the series, though Spike clearly gets the most attention regarding the closure of his story with the Syndicate and Cid. Faye gets a couple of episodes in which she goes searching for her past, eventually she gets a hold of a tape that was apparently taken on a class trip she was part of when she was a school girl...don't think she ever finds out anything solid, but she does leave one last time to go live on Earth. It's been years since I've seen the series, but I think she ends up working at the orphanage she grew up in...I could easily be remembering that wrong. :P

As for Ed, she doesn't really get much build-up to her storyline, but I do know she end up finding her real father and staying with him, but I think that just comes out of the blue in one of the last few episodes...there's no real build-up or any reference to it throughtout the series.

Spike, on the other hand, has 4 or 5 episodes dedicated to his story line, and the final two episodes of the series are what finally bring closure to that story.

Point is that while the majority of the episodes are indeed one-offs, there are a few continual stories that are expanded upon as the series progresses. :P

Pyrian:
Cowboy Bebop, summarized: Here's an introductory story where someone is really really good at something, and here's the rest of the series where they're almost entirely useless at it.

I mean, I get that they're trying to show a sort of hierarchy, but to me the whole thing came off as one big Worf Effect. Except it's not one character, it's most of them.

Eh, I wouldn't go that far. Spike's the main character of the show and as such is regarded as the most competent. Similarly, the majority of the episodes revolve around him. But beyond their introductory episodes, each other character gets an episode where it's their time to shine.

Faye recovers her memories in Hard Luck Woman by using the tape found in Speak Like a Child. She returns to her family's mansion and even draws out the outline of her old bedroom in the ruins in one of the saddest moments in the series. She stays with the Bebop till the end because "there was nowhere to go back to".

Holy Explosion of Comments!

Smilomaniac:

Nazulu:

Every year I see a thread or 2 based on Cowboy Bebop on here, but what about that other space western drama, Outlaw Star? Does that rank close to CB at all?

I assume you've seen it?
If not, then I'd say it's not as good, but just as entertaining. It's definitely worth watching, but then again I pretty much swear to older anime.

For a more realistic and political space drama, there's Legend of The Galactic Heroes (which is apparently being remade for 2017). It has a much slower pace, but centers around politics, tactics, classical heroes, philosophy and epic space battles which puts pretty much all other space battles to shame, in sheer scale.

I have seen it, I actually enjoyed Outlaw Star more, and I appreciate the recommendation, will check it out soon. Thank you.

RJ 17:
Faye, Spike, and Edward get closure to their personal story lines that play out through the series, though Spike clearly gets the most attention regarding the closure of his story with the Syndicate and Cid. Faye gets a couple of episodes in which she goes searching for her past, eventually she gets a hold of a tape that was apparently taken on a class trip she was part of when she was a school girl...don't think she ever finds out anything solid, but she does leave one last time to go live on Earth. It's been years since I've seen the series, but I think she ends up working at the orphanage she grew up in...I could easily be remembering that wrong. :P

As for Ed, she doesn't really get much build-up to her storyline, but I do know she end up finding her real father and staying with him, but I think that just comes out of the blue in one of the last few episodes...there's no real build-up or any reference to it throughtout the series.

Spike, on the other hand, has 4 or 5 episodes dedicated to his story line, and the final two episodes of the series are what finally bring closure to that story.

Point is that while the majority of the episodes are indeed one-offs, there are a few continual stories that are expanded upon as the series progresses. :P

It's been awhile since I've seen it too, and I know they get their closure and blah blah blah, but it still didn't stop it feeling like they were dropping off like fly's. It really made it feel like a hollow way to end it all off.

For some reason I do remember Ed's 'reason', as her father just suddenly pops up and puts Spikes fighting skills to shame (which feels out of place as well, after all he's been through for fucks sake) and Ed writes her note and that's it. Bam! All that time the characters spent together suddenly didn't mean much.

As for Spikes ending, I remember it really well because that was the most disappointing to me. Well not all of it, but his old girlfriend appears and disappears just as quick, and then his final battle with his rival (which the show gave me no reason to care about) is a quick shoot out that ends abruptly.

You know, I'm starting to think those episodes didn't need to be there and they could've just kept going with the short story's :-P

Sheo_Dagana:
Speaking as someone that loves Outlaw Star, and makes a habit of watching it through every couple of years, I can safely say that, while Outlaw Star is a great show, Cowboy Bebop beats it out in many areas. Admittedly, it's pretty hard to compare them because of the numerous science-fantasy elements present in Outlaw Star, while Cowboy Bebop has a broader tone that seamlessly slips between genres, where Outlaw Star focuses on the adventure and it's progression, with only a few side-episodes.

In many areas!? Can't say I agree. They both have their strengths. Well from what I remember, Outlaw star had the bigger intro which I found more dramatic. They both have many short story's (most I can remember, though CB had the more dramatic bits). And funnily enough, they both have very rushed unsatisfying final battles/endings (though I preferred Outlaw Stars because of the interesting powers). I can see how it's hard to compare.

Sheo_Dagana:
Even if there are issues with the show itself, there is no anime out there that is void of problems and contradictions, and any that Cowboy Bebop possess are fairly easy to overlook given the show's overall quality.

Have to disagree again. I really didn't like their continual story and departure episodes. They did absolutely nothing for me what so ever. It is a gigantic flaw! And another problem is even though they over-came some really serious threats, nothing ever came of it! You knew they would always struggle for money and it started to feel like it would never really get anywhere.

Some of the episodes are fun to re-watch, but that's it for me.

Nazulu:

Sheo_Dagana:
Speaking as someone that loves Outlaw Star, and makes a habit of watching it through every couple of years, I can safely say that, while Outlaw Star is a great show, Cowboy Bebop beats it out in many areas. Admittedly, it's pretty hard to compare them because of the numerous science-fantasy elements present in Outlaw Star, while Cowboy Bebop has a broader tone that seamlessly slips between genres, where Outlaw Star focuses on the adventure and it's progression, with only a few side-episodes.

In many areas!? Can't say I agree. They both have their strengths. Well from what I remember, Outlaw star had the bigger intro which I found more dramatic. They both have many short story's (most I can remember, though CB had the more dramatic bits). And funnily enough, they both have very rushed unsatisfying final battles/endings (though I preferred Outlaw Stars because of the interesting powers). I can see how it's hard to compare.

Sheo_Dagana:
Even if there are issues with the show itself, there is no anime out there that is void of problems and contradictions, and any that Cowboy Bebop possess are fairly easy to overlook given the show's overall quality.

Have to disagree again. I really didn't like their continual story and departure episodes. They did absolutely nothing for me what so ever. It is a gigantic flaw! And another problem is even though they over-came some really serious threats, nothing ever came of it! You knew they would always struggle for money and it started to feel like it would never really get anywhere.

Some of the episodes are fun to re-watch, but that's it for me.

I guess your critiques of Cowboy Bebop come down to a matter of preference. Outlaw Star is full of stock footage and the quality drops in a lot of places, especially when there isn't a grappler fight. The music is good, but the soundtrack for Cowboy Bebop is untouchable, which is a given considering how the show focused on and used the music in order to move the story forward itself. I mean, over-coming serious threats and nothing coming from it just goes to show just how big the world is and how all of the characters are just small parts of a larger world. It's also how life works - sometimes you put in a lot of effort, and in the end, nothing really matters and you end up with nothing to show for it.

The same thing happened frequently in Outlaw Star - Gene and crew went out on several jobs and often ended up more broke than they started, with a Hero's Journey being the only reason they managed to get anywhere at all. Like I said - it's really hard to compare. I can understand how people dislike some of what goes on in Cowboy Bebop, especially the ending (which I felt was perfect) that was that sort of quick, bitter-sweet ending that was pervasive throughout most anime in the 90s, but again, it just comes down to taste and preference. You'll never convince me that Robinson Crusoe is a worthwhile read, but many consider it to be a classic.

Sheo_Dagana:
I guess your critiques of Cowboy Bebop come down to a matter of preference. Outlaw Star is full of stock footage and the quality drops in a lot of places, especially when there isn't a grappler fight. The music is good, but the soundtrack for Cowboy Bebop is untouchable, which is a given considering how the show focused on and used the music in order to move the story forward itself. I mean, over-coming serious threats and nothing coming from it just goes to show just how big the world is and how all of the characters are just small parts of a larger world. It's also how life works - sometimes you put in a lot of effort, and in the end, nothing really matters and you end up with nothing to show for it.

The same thing happened frequently in Outlaw Star - Gene and crew went out on several jobs and often ended up more broke than they started, with a Hero's Journey being the only reason they managed to get anywhere at all. Like I said - it's really hard to compare. I can understand how people dislike some of what goes on in Cowboy Bebop, especially the ending (which I felt was perfect) that was that sort of quick, bitter-sweet ending that was pervasive throughout most anime in the 90s, but again, it just comes down to taste and preference. You'll never convince me that Robinson Crusoe is a worthwhile read, but many consider it to be a classic.

I don't why you brought up that my critiques are just as matter of preference when it doesn't make a difference. I already know how opinions work mate. In fact, I'm so used to people being sensitive here, that I feel I have put 'I' and 'me' and other self appointed words to make it obvious for others. If I really wanted to prove anything, I would have to re-watch the show in it's entirety and make far more accurate observations.

That said, I must say, I really dig the music in Cowboy Bebop... but it's not enough, because it still felt rushed. I get the bittersweet part, but I was not invested at all in his love interest or the villain because they did bugger all throughout the series! Well the villain being really basic. And no, the characters having the same problem every time the episode starts does not make the world feel bigger, only that it feels repetitive and safe. You know, like most sitcoms.

I will say this though. The way you see it is interesting, especially in that you build on it with real life problems, (though I can't see it like that because the show is nothing like real life) so I don't want to take that away from you of course.

Also, I never said Outlaw Star is perfect in any way. Seriously, the only reason why I may have enjoyed it more is just for extended intro and the caster being one of coolest weapons I've ever seen. That's it! It was either action or comedy from there.
The reason I criticise them though is because it's kinda perplexing to me. CB gets so much praise and yet it has similar problems to Inuyasha. I've heard the defenses before but it doesn't add up at all. Just like The Force Awakens, the flaws stick out like a sore thumb but many people can ignore it because other things worked, and I even disagree with that! The only thing I agree with on Cowboy Bebop is that some of the short story's were interesting and dramatic.

Gonna echo what some people in the facebook comments already said, Cowboy Bebop ruined anime for me, in the good "I'm not gonna like anything more than this" sort of way.

But I think "ruined" is kind of a strong term so I'll just call it a stop to my anime watching. Not that I haven't watched the odd anime here and there. My sister introduced me to Ouran High School Host Club and that was fun and we gave Attack On Titan a shot and I enjoyed those but really, Bebop kind of marked a finish line for me.

I can see not everybody loves and that's cool, whatever, but it resonates with everything I like so strongly that, well, that was it.

Funny thing I just want to say, somebody posted this video to a forum around here and I gave it a watch, got me into the show.

And it's the credits song for the Cowboy Bebop movie, which I saw after the series.
Marked my introduction and exit.
There's a nice poetry to that.

Hi! I have never seen Cowboy Bebop, but this review made me want to give it a shot. Would you consider reviewing Trigun?

Ah, Cowboy Bebop. I'm not a fan of most animes, but this is definately the exception to the rule.

Looking at the review, there's nothing I really disagree with, but one thing that I'd like to mention is that CB is one of the few pieces of animation I've seen where nihilism is the defining theme of the work, yet is woven excellently into the background rather than entering angst. I feel this really shines through towards the end. Faye can't go home again, and is fated to remain as she is. Ed's father will continue mapping the landscape of Earth, even though it's a hopeless endeavor due to the constant debris impacts (not to mention that no-one really seems to care about Earth anyway). Jet is an honest cop character, but in a setting such as this, no one cares. By the end of the series, Spike seems to have reached the point where he's ready to just let go. I also found it fitting that the bounty hunter TV show shut down towards the end of the series, adding to the sense of finality. Ultimately, Cowboy Bebop depicts a setting where ultimately, nothing matters, and all anyone can hope for is to just drift by from day to day. Yet ultimately there's beauty in the moment, exemplified by its soundtrack, among other things.

Or at least, that's my take.

Pyrian:
Spike? In the first episode, there's this guy taking hyperdrugs that let him defeat whole rooms full of armed guards single-handedly, and Spike defeats him almost contemptuously, just for the challenge. By the, what, second episode he's about on par with Faye, then continues to deteriorate in effectiveness, eventually getting casually smacked around by the hacker's father for no apparent reason whatsoever.

He's also been served pretty hard by the bad guy from the movie.

Truth is, Jeet Kun Do is really effective against numerous little-experienced enemies. But against a seasonned martial master, it's another story.

Bebop, pinacle of anime?
Not that much. An important stone, yes. But ignoring Slayers, GITS Stand Alone Complex, Tokyo Ghoul, Attack on Titan, Code Geass/Death Note, Macross Plus, Fruit Basket or Princess Tutu (yes, the storyteller anime version! ) ...
Come on.

mtarzaim02:

Bebop, pinacle of anime?
Not that much. An important stone, yes. But ignoring Slayers, GITS Stand Alone Complex, Tokyo Ghoul, Attack on Titan, Code Geass/Death Note, Macross Plus, Fruit Basket or Princess Tutu (yes, the storyteller anime version! ) ...
Come on.

Ugh, I liked Attack on Titan, but I don't know why it's that show that everyone references these days when talking about great anime. Outside of it's pretty animation, which was the only reason I kept watching, to be honest, the show is really boring and lacks substance.

Nazulu:
The reason I criticise them though is because it's kinda perplexing to me. CB gets so much praise and yet it has similar problems to Inuyasha. I've heard the defenses before but it doesn't add up at all. Just like The Force Awakens, the flaws stick out like a sore thumb but many people can ignore it because other things worked, and I even disagree with that! The only thing I agree with on Cowboy Bebop is that some of the short story's were interesting and dramatic.

Then I suppose you and I have nothing more to discuss. I wasn't trying to be condescending or overly sensitive in anyway. Cowboy Bebop is a show for people who appreciate subtlety, that doesn't make it smarter than Outlaw Star, which is a great action/adventure show, but it's something you don't get in a lot of anime, especially modern day. I disagree with pretty much all of your points concerning Cowboy Bebop just like you disagree with me, so I guess that's that.

 

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