Good Bad Flicks: Exploring A Boy and His Dog

Exploring A Boy and His Dog

Exploring the making of A Boy and His Dog.

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I guess the PG rating came from the fact it was 9 years before the PG-13 rating came about and someone figured it was just under the line for an R. Then again American standards where much lower. Not like today where everything with decent storytelling gets at least a PG-13. I feel lucky that here in Quebec all your PG-13 movies are rated G and most R rated movies are PG-13 (even Deadpool)

Another great "Good Bad Flicks." I was hoping you'd cover this film as it is one of my all time favorites. For being so low budget, I always found it to be endearing in the way it sculpted its world without the money to over do things. I am certain it would have been a much worse film if one of the bigger studios had nabbed the rights to make it and I've always admired Ellison's candor even if at times it makes him an ass.

I really like the way you explore these films CecilT and I envy your contributions. Covering the high points on both the film production side and the film criticism side really makes your series worth watching, especially for people like myself who love film.

Outside Quebec, though, I have perceived us Canadians to be a bit more prudish, and that movie is definitely an R to us. I contend it is not misogynistic, though.

I came to it having read the novella first. I hadn't realized there even was a film, let alone one with a baby Crockett and a beautiful doggy, so I dragged my tabletop gaming group to a midnight showing at a local repertory cinema. (The last line of the film surprised me, but the rest of it didn't.) An hour and a half later, we shuffled out of the cinema, sniggering, and the most conservative, macho guy of my group nodded at me and commented, "She took us to that?"

Yes, I did. The movie doesn't mention Maslow's hierarchy of needs, but its theme is how civilization makes us better people by requiring us to do more than filling our bellies, which is what something I think conservatives need to think about. The boy of the title isn't the movie's hero; it's the dog.

I really love this film. It's among my favorite sci-fi movies.

I remember Beast that shouted Love at the heart of the World being my first introduction to Ellison way back when, because at the time I was a massive Evangelion fan and was surprised that one of the episode titles was almost word for word the same as his collection (with "I" being used as a homophone for the japanese word Ai [love]).

Gorrath:
Another great "Good Bad Flicks." [...] I really like the way you explore these films CecilT and I envy your contributions. Covering the high points on both the film production side and the film criticism side really makes your series worth watching, especially for people like myself who love film.

I second that. Consistently good articles, keep up the good work!

Gorrath:
Another great "Good Bad Flicks." I was hoping you'd cover this film as it is one of my all time favorites. For being so low budget, I always found it to be endearing in the way it sculpted its world without the money to over do things. I am certain it would have been a much worse film if one of the bigger studios had nabbed the rights to make it and I've always admired Ellison's candor even if at times it makes him an ass.

I really like the way you explore these films CecilT and I envy your contributions. Covering the high points on both the film production side and the film criticism side really makes your series worth watching, especially for people like myself who love film.

Thanks! If this would have been done by a major studio, it would have been the trainwreck Ellison was envisioning. (animating the dog's mouth would have make it laughable)

He is a hothead but he has the talent to back it up. Its hard to find someone as passionate about their work these days.

Tamayo:
Outside Quebec, though, I have perceived us Canadians to be a bit more prudish, and that movie is definitely an R to us. I contend it is not misogynistic, though.

I came to it having read the novella first. I hadn't realized there even was a film, let alone one with a baby Crockett and a beautiful doggy, so I dragged my tabletop gaming group to a midnight showing at a local repertory cinema. (The last line of the film surprised me, but the rest of it didn't.) An hour and a half later, we shuffled out of the cinema, sniggering, and the most conservative, macho guy of my group nodded at me and commented, "She took us to that?"

Yes, I did. The movie doesn't mention Maslow's hierarchy of needs, but its theme is how civilization makes us better people by requiring us to do more than filling our bellies, which is what something I think conservatives need to think about. The boy of the title isn't the movie's hero; it's the dog.

I think a lot of that stems from people not realizing that in some things, the hero is not always the focal point. They just automatically assume that the lead actor/actress is the hero.

GreenSkin99:
I remember Beast that shouted Love at the heart of the World being my first introduction to Ellison way back when, because at the time I was a massive Evangelion fan and was surprised that one of the episode titles was almost word for word the same as his collection (with "I" being used as a homophone for the japanese word Ai [love]).

I knew of Ellison from Babylon 5 and then discovered I had already seen many things he wrote. I tracked down his books and am consistently blown away. He is a rare talent.

catalyst8:

I second that. Consistently good articles, keep up the good work!

Thank you! I'm glad you good folks are enjoying these, I enjoy making them. :)

 

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