Recession Hits Pro Gaming Leagues

Recession Hits Pro Gaming Leagues

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The recession has hit professional gaming leagues hard, according to a New York Times article that documents the rise and apparent fall of playing videogames for a living.

"Going into this, I busted my heart out," Emmanuel Rodriguez, a 23-year-old gamer told The New York Times. "It felt like I put in all this energy to build something big. I felt like everything I built up was gone."

Rodriguez, better known by his pro-Dead or Alive moniker Master, works at a Sam's Club in Dallas. Only a couple years ago, he was making a living as a professional gamer in the Championship Gaming Series, and was even named the MVP of North American DoA players. But that was before the economic took a nasty turn and CGS, which had the backing of major media outlet DirecTV, closed up shop.

That's the story for most other pro gaming leagues, according to the Times. Sponsorships are hard to come by these days, and along with the CGS, last year the Cyberathlete Professional League, which played host to professional competition in PC first-person shooters, ceased operations after 11 years.

The only game in town, it seems, is Major League Gaming, which runs console game competitions for titles like Halo 3 and Gears of War. "We have driven everybody else out of the business," MLG president Matthew Bromberg said. "The history of league sports begins with one league." According to Bromberg, MLG has not lost any of its sponsors and will actually turn its first profit this year.

Rodriguez, however, isn't quite ready to say "gg no re" to his dream. He's decided to ditch Dead or Alive and take up Street Fighter IV, which sounds like a plan. "I still believe in gaming," he said. "I wouldn't be able to live with myself if I just gave it up."

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I have contempt for pro gaming, gaming is not a spectator sport.

@dekkarax: google "starcraft + korea"

@article: it should be noted that the cpl ceased operations due to years of mismanagement rather than being a victim of the recession.

QQ more pro-nerds xD

wow i think it is ridiculous how this suffers and yet pro sports dont

Anyone care about pro gaming? Yea, me neither.

Korea laughs at them anyway

MLG blows. I could care less about their problems.

dekkarax:
I have contempt for pro gaming, gaming is not a spectator sport.

Seriously. I might be more sympathetic to the people who lost their "jobs" if they, and said jobs, weren't fucking stupid.

/mortal kombat voice

"Finish them!"

zuqbu:
@dekkarax: google "starcraft + korea"

Indeed, Starcraft is extremely popular in Korea, but I feel that gaming can never become a true spectator sport, as from what I have seen of professional gaming, it is excruciatingly boring to watch.

dekkarax:

zuqbu:
@dekkarax: google "starcraft + korea"

Indeed, Starcraft is extremely popular in Korea, but I feel that gaming can never become a true spectator sport, as from what I have seen of professional gaming, it is excruciatingly boring to watch.

Yet somehow Chess is considered a sport? Bassfishing? Curling? Balle (however you spell it)?

All of those "sports" require different skills from the players that play them, to say that for some reason Gaming can't be considered a specator sport while Flyfishng can be is absurd.

I'm not saying that the MLG is awesome (though, I personally liked watching the tournament), but video games can be as much of a sport as Football can. You may find it excruciatingly boring to watch, but you can say the same for any oher sport. Personally, I hate baseball, but it's a sport nonetheless.

Well gaming is still undervalued and it does make sense for it to also go by the wayside just as quickly. Video games have only been around for about half a decade. Compare that to other competitions that we consider build character or the mind like chess which has existed for...I don't know how long but it has been around.

Only time can show that if video games will be timeless sport because there is one other factor. The video game always changes. Chess and other sports do not.

orannis62:

dekkarax:
I have contempt for pro gaming, gaming is not a spectator sport.

Seriously. I might be more sympathetic to the people who lost their "jobs" if they, and said jobs, weren't fucking stupid.

I consider it a great hypocrisy that anyone in the Western world would decry someone's job as particularly stupid. We are all the beneficiaries of free-market capitalism, meaning that if people didn't make their livings by doing anything and everything, our system would not work as it does, and we would not be as affluent and untroubled by violence and turmoil as most of us are. Also, on an individual level, none of us would like anyone to accuse us of having a 'stupid' or 'pointless' job ourselves, regardless of our chosen career, so the universal Golden Rule obligates us to back off of other people in this regard.

On a less over-educated bourgeois liberal note, I agree that people who make a living playing fecking video games are societal vampires who should spend a day mining coal before they start complaining about how they can no longer afford to "work" at their non-job.

The Golden Rule does not apply to me, because I am tEh awesome. You're welcome.

Who watches professional gaming? Really? Why would I want to watch some tool play a game when I could be playing it myself? And in fact that's how I feel about all sports. Why would I watch people play basketball when I can go outside and play it myself and have more fun?

zuqbu:
@article: it should be noted that the cpl ceased operations due to years of mismanagement rather than being a victim of the recession.

That's probably the case for most if not all bankrupcies that happened in the recession, healthy companies don't just die in a few months like that.

dekkarax:
I have contempt for pro gaming, gaming is not a spectator sport.

how dare ye!

Keane Ng:

The only game in town, it seems, is Major League Gaming, which runs console game competitions for titles like Halo 3 and Gears of War. "We have driven everybody else out of the business," MLG president Matthew Bromberg said. "The history of league sports begins with one league." According to Bromberg, MLG has not lost any of its sponsors and will actually turn its first profit this year.

So it's not just the stereotypical MLG player that's arrogant and deprecating of their competitors/opponents then?

 

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