Sony Boss Says Industry Has A Confidentiality Problem

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Sony Boss Says Industry Has A Confidentiality Problem

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SCEA head Jack Tretton is bummed that the best parts of the Sony E3 keynote were leaked well before the company had a chance to unveil them, and thinks it's part of a larger problem in the videogame industry.

Jack Tretton probably really wanted to formally unveil Trico - now The Last Guardian - at the Sony E3 press conference. Unfortunately, the trailer was leaked beforehand. Or hey, it would probably have been a huge announcement if he'd been able to pull the cover off the PSP-Go ... but we knew about that one already, too. We knew that Sony was working on motion control. We knew a huge chunk of what Sony's presenters were going to say before they even stepped on stage.

Understandably, Tretton is kind of peeved: "Stop f**king leaking our news, you bastards."

Okay, he didn't actually say that. What he did say, though, was that the E3 leaks were endemic of a larger problem in the industry - people just can't seem to keep a secret. "People don't respect confidentiality in this industry," Tretton told CNBC. "It's tough enough to keep a secret within your own company, much less when you speak to third parties."

Annoying for things like the PSP Go, yes - but not crippling. But what about proprietary information like, say, new consoles? Companies rely on keeping their secrets, well, secret in order to eke out a potential lead in the bitter battles of the console war. What would have happened if Sony had learned the specifics of Project Natal two years ago? What would have happened if Microsoft knew exactly what Sony was planning with their own motion control? The omnipresence of leaks in the industry makes it hard to run a seaworthy ship.

"This is an industry that has trouble focusing on today," Tretton elaborated. "We want to constantly talk about tomorrow ... You have to prepare for people to know things in advance. The frustrating thing is they only know a part of the story and that opens up a lot of conjecture and misinformation that ultimately waters down the reality when you roll it out."

He also said that people with no financial stake in the matter should stop telling Sony to lower the price on the PS3 already, but c'mon, who really cares what he has to say? We all know they're going to lower the price. I mean, it came from a leak. It must be true!

(VG247)

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I'd say the world has a confidentiality problem these days. This is how information works now, though, and it's not going to change, whether or not Mr. Tretton wants it to.

"This is an industry that has trouble focusing on today," Tretton elaborated.

I like how he puts that, and I think it's spot-on.

It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

I really like secrets so much, i stop talking to new people unless forced

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

People working in the game industry must sign a confidentiality agreement. Even before pitching a concept to a publisher or to a company the people inside the room must sign a confidentiality agreement that what is shown in the room will not be used to the benefit of those it was meant to be pitched at.

This also includes programmers. Trade secrets are important in a company. Say if a programmer that worked on the Geo-Mod 2.0 engine suddenly works in Bethesda, and there is a tough algorithm with which they are experimenting with environmental damage. That programmer knows how to fix the problem, but it is in breach with his confidentiality agreement.

He has two options:

A) Break the agreement so the game goes on as schedualed and meet its milestones so he can get paid to pay the rent.

OR

B) Stick with the agreement to the letter and having the possibility of the game falling behind, or massive amounts of money being pumped into over-time to try and fix the problem when it could've been easily resolved in the first place.

Not only that but confidentiality agreements isn't just to do with "word of mouth", but rather where you work and what position you may work in. Some agreements force you not to work in a certain position/role in the industry for a certain amount of time, and in a certain area.

Meeting all the conditions on the agreement is obviously going to be very difficult for the said programmer when he leaves his place of work.

Such breachings of agreement, in these economic times, is going to be inevitable.

Keane Ng:
I'd say the world has a confidentiality problem these days. This is how information works now, though, and it's not going to change, whether or not Mr. Tretton wants it to.

"This is an industry that has trouble focusing on today," Tretton elaborated.

I like how he puts that, and I think it's spot-on.

I couldn't agree more.

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

You build up the hype, people get curious. Plus, it's also Sony's fault. One of the workers could be that jerk who for example gave a sneak peek to a friend and the friend wanted to have that youtube fame.

Industry leaks are getting very troublesome. I simpathise with Sony on this one, because of leaks like this publishers and developers are hesitant to share information with people like me out of fear I will leak it. But I wouldn't. I mean, Valve told me last week they are working on Half Life 3 and will be releasing it next year, and I haven't leaked it to anybody.

No, wait... ooo snap!

I can't get myself to care about this man's problems, really. It might have something to do with the fact that about half of the cool games coming out this year I want to play are ps3 only. And, since I'm very childish at times and don't possess a playstation 3, I'll blame this man.

But yes, it is a problem. Nobody can keep a secret anymore.

"This is an industry that has trouble focusing on today"

I don't think thats true, or they wouldn't have leaked the information... "today". :D

Darkrai:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

You build up the hype, people get curious. Plus, it's also Sony's fault. One of the workers could be that jerk who for example gave a sneak peek to a friend and the friend wanted to have that youtube fame.

Yup, couldn't agree more. The spotlight is hard for someone to overcome when it's right out in front of them, especially b/c nobody will do anything about it.

Spinwhiz:

Darkrai:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

You build up the hype, people get curious. Plus, it's also Sony's fault. One of the workers could be that jerk who for example gave a sneak peek to a friend and the friend wanted to have that youtube fame.

Yup, couldn't agree more. The spotlight is hard for someone to overcome when it's right out in front of them, especially b/c nobody will do anything about it.

You're right. It is quite sad.

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

People working in the game industry must sign a confidentiality agreement. Even before pitching a concept to a publisher or to a company the people inside the room must sign a confidentiality agreement that what is shown in the room will not be used to the benefit of those it was meant to be pitched at.

This also includes programmers. Trade secrets are important in a company. Say if a programmer that worked on the Geo-Mod 2.0 engine suddenly works in Bethesda, and there is a tough algorithm with which they are experimenting with environmental damage. That programmer knows how to fix the problem, but it is in breach with his confidentiality agreement.

He has two options:

A) Break the agreement so the game goes on as schedualed and meet its milestones so he can get paid to pay the rent.

OR

B) Stick with the agreement to the letter and having the possibility of the game falling behind, or massive amounts of money being pumped into over-time to try and fix the problem when it could've been easily resolved in the first place.

Not only that but confidentiality agreements isn't just to do with "word of mouth", but rather where you work and what position you may work in. Some agreements force you not to work in a certain position/role in the industry for a certain amount of time, and in a certain area.

Meeting all the conditions on the agreement is obviously going to be very difficult for the said programmer when he leaves his place of work.

Such breachings of agreement, in these economic times, is going to be inevitable.

Perhaps, but it's not so much about the agreement being breached for betterment of a product. That happens all the time but the project manager usually knows about that change, setback, etc and changes made by the project manager is still usually covered by the agreement.

Info getting to the mainstream media and then being posted everywhere is a different item altogether. That means someone went outside of direct contacts with the project, which doesn't need to happen. Regardless of what part of a project internal people work on, information given to the public prior to signed authorization in any way, shape or form is just sad. How hard is it NOT to talk to your friends or media about a project you are working on? (not YOU personally, the "royal" you)

Alleged_Alec:
"This is an industry that has trouble focusing on today," Tretton elaborated. "We want to constantly talk about tomorrow ... You have to prepare for people to know things in advance. The frustrating thing is they only know a part of the story and that opens up a lot of conjecture and misinformation that ultimately waters down the reality when you roll it out."

This sums up the real problem. You need to build hype for your product but you also have to keep most of the details of your produce secret. Then there is the rumor mill which if there is too little information will create nonsense out of whole cloth. This in turn leads to the same conjecture and misinformation issues that result if too much gets out too soon.

A more cynical person might also wonder if in some cases a Mr. Phellps (the original Mission Impossible) is going on.

Spinwhiz:

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

People working in the game industry must sign a confidentiality agreement. Even before pitching a concept to a publisher or to a company the people inside the room must sign a confidentiality agreement that what is shown in the room will not be used to the benefit of those it was meant to be pitched at.

This also includes programmers. Trade secrets are important in a company. Say if a programmer that worked on the Geo-Mod 2.0 engine suddenly works in Bethesda, and there is a tough algorithm with which they are experimenting with environmental damage. That programmer knows how to fix the problem, but it is in breach with his confidentiality agreement.

He has two options:

A) Break the agreement so the game goes on as schedualed and meet its milestones so he can get paid to pay the rent.

OR

B) Stick with the agreement to the letter and having the possibility of the game falling behind, or massive amounts of money being pumped into over-time to try and fix the problem when it could've been easily resolved in the first place.

Not only that but confidentiality agreements isn't just to do with "word of mouth", but rather where you work and what position you may work in. Some agreements force you not to work in a certain position/role in the industry for a certain amount of time, and in a certain area.

Meeting all the conditions on the agreement is obviously going to be very difficult for the said programmer when he leaves his place of work.

Such breachings of agreement, in these economic times, is going to be inevitable.

Perhaps, but it's not so much about the agreement being breached for betterment of a product. That happens all the time but the project manager usually knows about that change, setback, etc and changes made by the project manager is still usually covered by the agreement.

Info getting to the mainstream media and then being posted everywhere is a different item altogether. That means someone went outside of direct contacts with the project, which doesn't need to happen. Regardless of what part of a project internal people work on, information given to the public prior to signed authorization in any way, shape or form is just sad. How hard is it NOT to talk to your friends or media about a project you are working on? (not YOU personally, the "royal" you)

Totally agree with you. Remember that slip up with one of the voice actors' comment on Twitter for lending his voice on Fable III? That was a major mess up.

even confidentiality couldn't save sony from sucking

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

People working in the game industry must sign a confidentiality agreement. Even before pitching a concept to a publisher or to a company the people inside the room must sign a confidentiality agreement that what is shown in the room will not be used to the benefit of those it was meant to be pitched at.

This also includes programmers. Trade secrets are important in a company. Say if a programmer that worked on the Geo-Mod 2.0 engine suddenly works in Bethesda, and there is a tough algorithm with which they are experimenting with environmental damage. That programmer knows how to fix the problem, but it is in breach with his confidentiality agreement.

He has two options:

A) Break the agreement so the game goes on as schedualed and meet its milestones so he can get paid to pay the rent.

OR

B) Stick with the agreement to the letter and having the possibility of the game falling behind, or massive amounts of money being pumped into over-time to try and fix the problem when it could've been easily resolved in the first place.

Not only that but confidentiality agreements isn't just to do with "word of mouth", but rather where you work and what position you may work in. Some agreements force you not to work in a certain position/role in the industry for a certain amount of time, and in a certain area.

Meeting all the conditions on the agreement is obviously going to be very difficult for the said programmer when he leaves his place of work.

Such breachings of agreement, in these economic times, is going to be inevitable.

Perhaps, but it's not so much about the agreement being breached for betterment of a product. That happens all the time but the project manager usually knows about that change, setback, etc and changes made by the project manager is still usually covered by the agreement.

Info getting to the mainstream media and then being posted everywhere is a different item altogether. That means someone went outside of direct contacts with the project, which doesn't need to happen. Regardless of what part of a project internal people work on, information given to the public prior to signed authorization in any way, shape or form is just sad. How hard is it NOT to talk to your friends or media about a project you are working on? (not YOU personally, the "royal" you)

Totally agree with you. Remember that slip up with one of the voice actors' comment on Twitter for lending his voice on Fable III? That was a major mess up.

Oopsie! At least that is more of a brain fart...yet still a moronic move which puts them in a bad position. What is worse is when people from inside Sony, not just some voice over talent, leaks info. They TOTALLY know what they are doing when they leak info, so it's a blatant slap in the face and a middle finger that they don't give a shit about the company they work for. I hope they find those people and take their jobs away for being idiots.

I like Trenton and the man has a point. People do these kinds of things all the time, like what's his name saying he was playing Captain Phoenix in Jak and Daxter PSP. The whole community knew that this game, announced in April, 2009 was going to happen and what title it was going to have since 200-fucking-5.

The thing is, NDA agreements are one half of the cure here. But an NDA gets to be useless when you can't pinpoint the leak. What needs to be done is a show of force from one of the bigger companies, where if their product is leaked, the entire project is scrapped and the team fired. Yes, you may get a Duke Nukem Forever problem developing, but this is happening because developers don't see consequences. Two or three of these mass-firings and cancellations, and the problem WILL disappear.

If you CAN ID the specific person who leaked the project, then just publicly/financially crucify him. If you made it possible through the original hiring contract, make them financially responsible for the difference between projected sales and actual sales (if info leaked), or responsible for the full purchase price of every confirmed pirated copy (if software leaked).

I have no sympathy. I'd rather get my news as a drip fed string of rumors that's eventually confirmed. That way, I know exactly how I feel about any given development.

Call it the free market of PR.

Khell_Sennet:
The thing is, NDA agreements are one half of the cure here. But an NDA gets to be useless when you can't pinpoint the leak. What needs to be done is a show of force from one of the bigger companies, where if their product is leaked, the entire project is scrapped and the team fired. Yes, you may get a Duke Nukem Forever problem developing, but this is happening because developers don't see consequences. Two or three of these mass-firings and cancellations, and the problem WILL disappear.

If you CAN ID the specific person who leaked the project, then just publicly/financially crucify him. If you made it possible through the original hiring contract, make them financially responsible for the difference between projected sales and actual sales (if info leaked), or responsible for the full purchase price of every confirmed pirated copy (if software leaked).

Great... that's what I'd call the Gestapo approach. It fixes problems with an iron resolve while exacerbating other classic problems, like mistrust of management or poor public image.

But if Grand Moff Tarkin here wants to blow up a few planets with some "mass firings", be my guest. It's your game co.s funeral.

Spinwhiz:

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:

mentor07825:

Spinwhiz:
It's not a problem with the industry, it's a problem with people in general. They just can't keep their damn mouths shut almost as if they feel it's their job to let everyone know "secret" information. Sad.

People working in the game industry must sign a confidentiality agreement. Even before pitching a concept to a publisher or to a company the people inside the room must sign a confidentiality agreement that what is shown in the room will not be used to the benefit of those it was meant to be pitched at.

This also includes programmers. Trade secrets are important in a company. Say if a programmer that worked on the Geo-Mod 2.0 engine suddenly works in Bethesda, and there is a tough algorithm with which they are experimenting with environmental damage. That programmer knows how to fix the problem, but it is in breach with his confidentiality agreement.

He has two options:

A) Break the agreement so the game goes on as schedualed and meet its milestones so he can get paid to pay the rent.

OR

B) Stick with the agreement to the letter and having the possibility of the game falling behind, or massive amounts of money being pumped into over-time to try and fix the problem when it could've been easily resolved in the first place.

Not only that but confidentiality agreements isn't just to do with "word of mouth", but rather where you work and what position you may work in. Some agreements force you not to work in a certain position/role in the industry for a certain amount of time, and in a certain area.

Meeting all the conditions on the agreement is obviously going to be very difficult for the said programmer when he leaves his place of work.

Such breachings of agreement, in these economic times, is going to be inevitable.

Perhaps, but it's not so much about the agreement being breached for betterment of a product. That happens all the time but the project manager usually knows about that change, setback, etc and changes made by the project manager is still usually covered by the agreement.

Info getting to the mainstream media and then being posted everywhere is a different item altogether. That means someone went outside of direct contacts with the project, which doesn't need to happen. Regardless of what part of a project internal people work on, information given to the public prior to signed authorization in any way, shape or form is just sad. How hard is it NOT to talk to your friends or media about a project you are working on? (not YOU personally, the "royal" you)

Totally agree with you. Remember that slip up with one of the voice actors' comment on Twitter for lending his voice on Fable III? That was a major mess up.

Oopsie! At least that is more of a brain fart...yet still a moronic move which puts them in a bad position. What is worse is when people from inside Sony, not just some voice over talent, leaks info. They TOTALLY know what they are doing when they leak info, so it's a blatant slap in the face and a middle finger that they don't give a shit about the company they work for. I hope they find those people and take their jobs away for being idiots.

Most likely what will happen is that they will lose their jobs and are open to a lawsuit.

Not only that but it doesn't leave them in a good position when their employer, Sony, spreads the word that they broke a huge confendiatility agreement. Rather then doors opening for working in such a big company it would most likely be doors would close for them.

They may think that by breaching contract, for whatever gains (even there are none) may benefit them now (which such actions might) they are shooting themselves in the foot for opportunities later on.

Wait, Jack Tretton says something that isn't stupid?

Suffice it to say he's pretty much right. Confidentiality is a problem, and yet enforcing it is a bigger problem. Example: Insomniac Games right now has their secrets of PS3 development online for free for anyone to view. What happens if someone decides that should now be withheld? You can't close pandora's box after it's been opened, after all.

Yeah, it does have a confidentiality problem. It keeps too much crap confidential! What do I care if I come to know of a game ahead of time? It's how it plays when it's released that matters. Leaked trailers, leaked titles, who cares? Movies can be announced years in advance and just drift to the background until they're close to being finished.

edgeofblade:
But if Grand Moff Tarkin here wants to blow up a few planets with some "mass firings", be my guest. It's your game co.s funeral.

I don't know how much you know about business or law, Edge. Your profile is a blank slate and you are new here. I don't know if I'm talking to an adult with thirty years experience in the business world, or a teenager with no real clue on how things work. Forgive me, then, if what I say tends to assume you know jack squat about the way things work.

Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) are contracts between two parties, where Party A is placing Party B in a position where Party B will be privy to confidential information which, if made public, could damage a Party A. By signing the NDA, Party B is agreeing that what they learn will be kept confidential, and should they fail in that, can be held accountable for whatever damages were specified in the NDA.

In layman's terms, that means you sign an agreement not to reveal confidential items, and if you break that contract, (depending on the wording of the NDA) you can be accountable for any lost profits, incurred expenses, or legal fees that arise from your breach in contract. By leaking a game you are being paid to work on, you can quite easily be responsible for compensating that company for the entire development cost and/or the expected sales volume of the product. That's no small potatoes there. All of that, is already in place and legally binding, and if any company finds someone breaching their NDA, they can and will do this to the offender.

The only radical aspect I suggested, is firing the team and canceling/shelving the project, if the culprit cannot be identified. From a business perspective, it's not exactly like blowing up Alderaan. You have a team of workers who are responsible for the creation and protection of a project worth millions of dollars. If someone on that team is working against the company, you MUST take action. If you can't figure out who, then it is (again, from a business perspective) safer and preferable to fire everyone who could have possibly caused the leak, than to risk leaving them in a position to do further damage. You can hire new programmers, you can't remove a torrent once seeded online.

If this were defense contractor projects, not video games, a breach of an NDA can be considered treason, and punishable by death. Programmers get off easy compared to this.

A culture of hype or a culture of secrecy -- pick one, Sony; you can't have both.

An industry that loves tantalizing previews and triumphant grand revelations is going to inspire the same feelings in its workers.

-- Alex

Khell_Sennet:
You can hire new programmers, you can't remove a torrent once seeded online.

Completely replacing your development staff part-way through a project means months spent just scrambling to get back to where you were before. In gaming, a year of schedule slippage really is blowing up Alderaan. If there's another leak and another reset after the first one, you'll just have to scrap the whole project because it'll be worthless by the time it's actually released.

-- Alex

Alex_P:
A culture of hype or a culture of secrecy -- pick one, Sony; you can't have both.

An industry that loves tantalizing previews and triumphant grand revelations is going to inspire the same feelings in its workers.

-- Alex

Previews and hands-on demos are different from leaks and torrents. The least you could do is stop the leaks from happening inside the company itself.

Alex_P:

Khell_Sennet:
You can hire new programmers, you can't remove a torrent once seeded online.

Completely replacing your development staff part-way through a project means months spent just scrambling to get back to where you were before. In gaming, a year of schedule slippage really is blowing up Alderaan. If there's another leak and another reset after the first one, you'll just have to scrap the whole project because it'll be worthless by the time it's actually released.

-- Alex

Think of it more as just nuking a city as opposed to blowing up the planet. Most game developers have more than one project on the go... You let that NDA-breaking programmer stay, and he could compromise the other games as well, or you can cut off one arm to save the patient.

Jumplion:
Previews and hands-on demos are different from leaks and torrents. The least you could do is stop the leaks from happening inside the company itself.

Well, duh, previews and demos are official.

But an industry that's all about E3 grandstanding and release-day blowouts and endlessly encourages consumers to get really excited about that stuff is inevitably going to create a situation where people get immense psychological validation from leaking the news a few days ahead of schedule to kick-start the hype tornado. You created the source of that psychological validation in the first place.

-- Alex

Khell_Sennet:

edgeofblade:
But if Grand Moff Tarkin here wants to blow up a few planets with some "mass firings", be my guest. It's your game co.s funeral.

I don't know how much you know about business or law, Edge. Your profile is a blank slate and you are new here. I don't know if I'm talking to an adult with thirty years experience in the business world, or a teenager with no real clue on how things work. Forgive me, then, if what I say tends to assume you know jack squat about the way things work.

Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) are contracts between two parties, where Party A is placing Party B in a position where Party B will be privy to confidential information which, if made public, could damage a Party A. By signing the NDA, Party B is agreeing that what they learn will be kept confidential, and should they fail in that, can be held accountable for whatever damages were specified in the NDA.

In layman's terms, that means you sign an agreement not to reveal confidential items, and if you break that contract, (depending on the wording of the NDA) you can be accountable for any lost profits, incurred expenses, or legal fees that arise from your breach in contract. By leaking a game you are being paid to work on, you can quite easily be responsible for compensating that company for the entire development cost and/or the expected sales volume of the product. That's no small potatoes there. All of that, is already in place and legally binding, and if any company finds someone breaching their NDA, they can and will do this to the offender.

The only radical aspect I suggested, is firing the team and canceling/shelving the project, if the culprit cannot be identified. From a business perspective, it's not exactly like blowing up Alderaan. You have a team of workers who are responsible for the creation and protection of a project worth millions of dollars. If someone on that team is working against the company, you MUST take action. If you can't figure out who, then it is (again, from a business perspective) safer and preferable to fire everyone who could have possibly caused the leak, than to risk leaving them in a position to do further damage. You can hire new programmers, you can't remove a torrent once seeded online.

If this were defense contractor projects, not video games, a breach of an NDA can be considered treason, and punishable by death. Programmers get off easy compared to this.

-26
-masters of science in information technology
-work for a the IT department of a Fortune 500
-just finished 1 yr experience in leadership program
-you are forgiven.

Just because you can push the big red button and obliterate your target does not mean you can handle the fallout from that nuking. Are you going to keep firing nukes at your ever growing problems that never get solved?

What about your reputation as a company? Do you think consumers are going to appreciate a company who leaks information... giving the consumers EXACTLY what they want... and then fires an entire development team... in a recession no less? That's a recipe for a boycott fiasco. That would reach mainstream news. Your company would be publicly derided in the evening news and the biz channels. You would also probably have a ton of wrongful termination suits... valid or not... with public opinion on their side. In other words, whip yourself up a perfect storm of litigation, liability, and public image suicide and see how well that company of yours survives.

If...and only if...you can nail down the culprit that released your code, sure... out the door in a heartbeat and ruin that person for being a party to theft... not because of an NDA. But for heaven's sake, don't can the entire team just to make a point.

And it's not a defense contractor. It's a video game company. No one is going to die because Sony didn't get to be the first one to break the news of the PSP Go...

As to the confidentiality leeching all the megaton announcements from Sony... it's a simple matter of economics. Restrict the flow of information; increase the demand for that information. Sites like Kotaku, Joystiq, and Escapist monetize that information.

Welcome to the black market.

The point is, there is a wide gulf between what you CAN do and what you SHOULD do.

If Sony didn't want their business to get out, they should have been more secretive about it.

edgeofblade:
Just because you can push the big red button and obliterate your target does not mean you can handle the fallout from that nuking. Are you going to keep firing nukes at your ever growing problems that never get solved?

What about your reputation as a company? Do you think consumers are going to appreciate a company who leaks information... giving the consumers EXACTLY what they want... and then fires an entire development team... in a recession no less? That's a recipe for a boycott fiasco. That would reach mainstream news. Your company would be publicly derided in the evening news and the biz channels. You would also probably have a ton of wrongful termination suits... valid or not... with public opinion on their side. In other words, whip yourself up a perfect storm of litigation, liability, and public image suicide and see how well that company of yours survives.

If...and only if...you can nail down the culprit that released your code, sure... out the door in a heartbeat and ruin that person for being a party to theft... not because of an NDA. But for heaven's sake, don't can the entire team just to make a point.

And it's not a defense contractor. It's a video game company. No one is going to die because Sony didn't get to be the first one to break the news of the PSP Go...

As to the confidentiality leeching all the megaton announcements from Sony... it's a simple matter of economics. Restrict the flow of information; increase the demand for that information. Sites like Kotaku, Joystiq, and Escapist monetize that information.

Welcome to the black market.

The point is, there is a wide gulf between what you CAN do and what you SHOULD do.

Never said it was a clean or easy answer, but I do believe you'd only have to do it once or twice in the entire industry and the problem would start to disappear. Knowing that you WILL lose your job if you do something wrong, is a greater deterrent than knowing there's a chance you'd be caught and lose your job. And as the rest of the team is going to be paying closer attention to who is doing what, because their necks are on the line too.

I don't honestly expect anyone to try this, and I don't truly think it's the best solution, but it is a solution, and the kind of solution I prefer. But I'm the kind of dictatorial/totalitarian mindset.

Is it just me? Or does Sony suffer from leakages far more than Nintendo or Microsoft?

chrisdibs:
even confidentiality couldn't save sony from sucking

They still had the best conference.

The Shade:
Is it just me? Or does Sony suffer from leakages far more than Nintendo or Microsoft?

That might be because they have far more to talk about than Microsoft or Nintendo. Sony showed off a guaranteed flawless game and a new hardware revision. Neither Microsoft nor Nintendo had a guaranteed flawless game nor a new hardware revisions

CantFaketheFunk:
Sony Boss Says Industry Has A Confidentiality Problem

He also said that people with no financial stake in the matter should stop telling Sony to lower the price on the PS3 already, but c'mon, who really cares what he has to say? We all know they're going to lower the price. I mean, it came from a leak. It must be true!

(VG247)

Permalink

What a stupid thing to say. The people buying your systems ARE your financial team. If the people are demanding a lower price on something, and those people are a decent majority, you lower the fucking price on it. It's not the company that sets the price, it's what the customer is willing to pay that sets the price. Right?..............Right?

I can honestly say that if the PS3 wasn't so damn expensive, I'd more than likely buy one. Not to mention the fact that I get the same exact games on 360, except for a given few. At this moment in time the PS3 doesn't look better, doesn't play better, and doesn't clean my house better. So there is no sense in me throwing down an extra 400-500 dollars on top of what I already did for my 360 at launch. If the price was 300-400, I may consider it.

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