Ubisoft Dev Quits His Job Via Flash Game

Ubisoft Dev Quits His Job Via Flash Game

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William David, a Ubisoft developer, decided to quit his job in the same way he did it: by making a game.

Leaving your job is always a tricky business. You're happy because you're hopeful to move onto greener pastures, but at the same time you're afraid of new things. It's an experience full of optimism and apprehension, and, undoubtedly, awkwardness. How do you tell your colleagues that you're saying goodbye to them without inadvertently saying you're leaving them behind? For William David, a Ubisoft developer, the answer was to do it the only way he knew how: by making a game.

In Leaving, you control a character by scrolling from left to right, as you move away from a giant theater with the Ubisoft logo on its marquee. As you pass across black-and-white screens to a graceful Frank Sinatra soundtrack, you encounter other figures. They'll ask you why you're going, they'll tell you not to go, they'll urge caution. Some will express encouragement, though they're not exactly cheering you on. When you reach the final screen, you have to make a literal leap of faith. Easy enough to do in a videogame, maybe not so easy in real life.

It's really a very touching experience, not as much of a "f**k you, big company" as you might expect, probably closer to Jason Rohrer's popular "art game" Passage, though obviously it's not nearly as grave as that. Mostly it seems to be David's way of communicating to people why he decided to go, why he needs to go and what it's been like for him. I found myself empathizing with the player character in a surprising way: I would stop moving when a person talked to me, as if I were hesitating myself, and when I got to the final "leap of faith," I tried to make the character turn back. "No way back," it said, the only thing it seems to be able to say in the game.

David is apparently starting on a career as an indie developer. I wish him good luck, though he seems to be off to a decent start already.

[Via IndieGames]

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I'd like to do so too when i quit.

This might just be the best way to quit your job ever. Quitting a game company by making a game about quitting them.

If I manage to get a job at Bethesda working on TES games...Id never quit. I'd go down with the ship even.

Play the game here. I liked it.

This guy is officially my person of the week.

its actually touching...

i want to drink beer.

That's brilliant. I think everyone should quit their jobs in ways relevant to their profession.
Although that might be awkward if you're a sewage worker.

Good work on his part: it was really touching for a flash game with only three buttons. I wish him the best of luck.

That was very sweet, a touching way to say goodbye. He just earned a virtual cookie. I wonder what Ubisoft titles he worked on, anyone has an idea?

Now there's a goodbye with panache.

What a surprisingly great way to quit.

Well, that's a very borrowed idea now...

cool,I would of just left,of course that would be because I did not work there and would have been escorted of the premisise

NoMoreSanity:
What a surprisingly great way to quit.

It was a pretty touching experience to play it. Very good idea.

Mezzamine:
That's brilliant. I think everyone should quit their jobs in ways relevant to their profession.
Although that might be awkward if you're a sewage worker.

Lmao, nice one =P

OT: It's probably the best way if you care for the people you're "leaving behind".

It could have been worse. He could have made office massace the flash game. Seriously, it is a beautiful game. This guy is going places.

Looks like he's my unofficial favorite game developer of the week.

Congratulations on coming to his senses that's all I have to say.

Ubisoft doesn't need good people quitting.. .It needs good people joining, so the games aren't filled to the brim with lots of stupid glitches that would take all of 30 seconds to fix if they paid attention.

Artsy, but if you were expecting innovative gameplay you'd be disappointed. It's pretty much just a g'bye y'all letter.

This sounds strangely familiar...

I could care less about the goodbye letter/game; I'm actually more excited about William David leaving to pursue what he wants to do in game development. If Ubisoft allowed this guy to express himself in his game development, I'm sure he'd still be there. That's what the industry needs: more self-motivated developers who need to express themselves through video games. This guy gets my respect.

mikecoulter:
Well, that's a very borrowed idea now...

I knew it.
Wasnt there a story JUST LIKE THIS ONE, on the News Room a few months back.
Cause if so, this guy is responsible for the SECOND BEST way to leave a job.
:)

nova18:

mikecoulter:
Well, that's a very borrowed idea now...

I knew it.
Wasnt there a story JUST LIKE THIS ONE, on the News Room a few months back.
Cause if so, this guy is responsible for the SECOND BEST way to leave a job.
:)

Yeah, I had a go of the game. It was also a platformer, the other one was better in my opinion too.

scotth266:
Good work on his part: it was really touching for a flash game with only three buttons. I wish him the best of luck.

Took the words right out of my mouth, Scott. So simple, yet so very... profound.

I like this guy.

I adore that! Especially the music. Though I was surprised to see his gmail address implied he's only 25, ballsy move leaving a behemoth like Ubisoft at such a young age, all the best to him!

Good for him! And I loved Sinatra in the background.

Old news is REALLY fucking OLD

Haha, that was classy :-)

This was done a long time by someone at 2K games... actually reported on the Escapist: http://www.escapistmagazine.com/forums/read/7.110206

This was kind of touching in an odd way.
Pretty swank way of leaving too.

What a kindly man! Hope he goes on to do good things.

 

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