Scientist Says Building Gundam Models Makes You Smarter

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

I'm a gunpla enthusiast, it's good fun, and it makes you feel like an engineer...

And when you mod it with styrene sheets, MSGs, custom paintjobs, youre an artist!

I think there is validity to this. I spent the greater part of my elementary school days walking to Scale Model Supplies, then the local Japan-o-shop, just for the sole purpose of buying Gundam models. I would then go home, assemble, and detail them. This was pretty much a daily activity for me. It got to the point where my two purpose built shelfs couldn't hold all the models, and I had to put some in storage, and throw some out. I built them all, including the 1/100 AND 5/100 (I think) scale Burning Gundams, both Deathscythe models, and about another 30+ from Gundam Seed (Justice and Guardian(this right?) being my favorite of that series). It surely didn't help with my financial situation, as I probably put well over $200 of my own money down for models.

But, I have gained a great deal of fine motor control. Now, I have moved on to bigger, more expensive hobbies, such as system building. I recently put my rig in a new case, something that takes most people about 2-3 hours, in about 30 minutes to an hour. I also can concentrate really well, and have much more patience for building things. If they indeed prove this correct, then I could certainly be a poster child for why Gundam models make you smart.

snowman6251:
You say GET to paint them. I say HAVE to paint them. I don't like painting.

I was trying to use cheesy psychology on you - convincing you that you got to do something fun as opposed to having to do something you didn't like to do. Guess I won't quit my day job :) The parts come colored, mostly in their end colors, so you don't technically have to paint them, but the finished gundam is much more defined and striking when painted. There are often annoyingly small decals too.

I found out I'm not going to get my girly pink gundam after all. It's a limited edition, no such thing as back orders...

snowman6251:
Do you have to hand paint those Gundam models because that would absolutely seal the deal as a NEVER for me.

If not it might be fun and I like Gundam.

You can paint them, but it isn't necessary unless you want to add some fine detail to the model (or hide some really bad detachment scars/file marks). The individual parts come pre-colored.

John Funk:

...and a hell of a lot of patience when you can't complete that one goddamn kit because the screw you need is stripped and stuck halfway in and you can't do a goddamn thing with ... er, sorry, I got a bit sidetracked.

I really hope that wasn't a Perfect Grade that happened to. That would just suck.

My personal nemesis is the part that connects the halves of the wings on the MG Strike Freedom. It was the Full Burst Mode version, too. That was $110 CDN down the drain.

They are preety tough to build, i just wish my brother dident destory all of mine :(, i had burning, shining, dragon, wing zero, and justice, and he destoryed them all!

Deofuta:
It would be nice if it were true, but it certainly does seem similar to the Brain Train argument.

Well the argument against Brain Train and now this is the same as most arguments against anything that isn't a 'magical fix everything' solution. Do people only need to make plastic models to become geniuses? Of course not. Would it hurt to utilise your brain regularly in the construction of intricate models - cutting, gluing, painting and posing them? Quite the contrary.

'Make you smarter' is a very vague thing to say. Most people would assume this to have an impact like how constant weightlifting 'makes you bigger'. In studies like this however, the differences can still be significant without being drastic.

SachielOne:

snowman6251:
Do you have to hand paint those Gundam models because that would absolutely seal the deal as a NEVER for me.

If not it might be fun and I like Gundam.

You can paint them, but it isn't necessary unless you want to add some fine detail to the model (or hide some really bad detachment scars/file marks). The individual parts come pre-colored.

John Funk:

...and a hell of a lot of patience when you can't complete that one goddamn kit because the screw you need is stripped and stuck halfway in and you can't do a goddamn thing with ... er, sorry, I got a bit sidetracked.

I really hope that wasn't a Perfect Grade that happened to. That would just suck.

My personal nemesis is the part that connects the halves of the wings on the MG Strike Freedom. It was the Full Burst Mode version, too. That was $110 CDN down the drain.

Nah, MG Nu. Still $70 spent for nothing, though.

BustaNinja:
I think there is validity to this. I spent the greater part of my elementary school days walking to Scale Model Supplies, then the local Japan-o-shop, just for the sole purpose of buying Gundam models. I would then go home, assemble, and detail them. This was pretty much a daily activity for me. It got to the point where my two purpose built shelfs couldn't hold all the models, and I had to put some in storage, and throw some out. I built them all, including the 1/100 AND 5/100 (I think) scale Burning Gundams, both Deathscythe models, and about another 30+ from Gundam Seed (Justice and Guardian(this right?) being my favorite of that series). It surely didn't help with my financial situation, as I probably put well over $200 of my own money down for models.

But, I have gained a great deal of fine motor control. Now, I have moved on to bigger, more expensive hobbies, such as system building. I recently put my rig in a new case, something that takes most people about 2-3 hours, in about 30 minutes to an hour. I also can concentrate really well, and have much more patience for building things. If they indeed prove this correct, then I could certainly be a poster child for why Gundam models make you smart.

And there are different kinds of intelligence and mental ability. It depends on what the study was measuring. Certainly you are right in making these models, or anything similar, would exercise the pathways needed for coordination and fine muscle control, as well perhaps one's eye for detail and spatial awareness. There are so many people that can't visualise 3D objects and depth. And definately, such activities should also help with building concentration and patience. I don't think that one brief article on a news site like this is enough to fully understand the breadth of this study. I would like to read more.

Another silly claim by a scientist that I find hard to believe. Okey dokey, moving right along.

They forgot to include the second half of the article that said that while making you smarter, building mecha models also causes the male body to secrete a sort of anti-pheromone that causes women to be unaware of your existence. Conversely, the effect is opposite when women are the ones building the models, that pheromone causes males at various conventions to flock to them like a fat kid to free french fries.

Sweet. All my collection of various Armored Core models and the tedious amount of time I put away assembling them has made me a genius. :D

Hurr Durr Derp:
All those poor Asian kids in sweatshops assembling toys all day every day must be geniuses!

You sir, made my day.

Deofuta:
It would be nice if it were true, but it certainly does seem similar to the Brain Train argument.

I have never heard of this "brain train" what is it?

Playing Warhammer makes you a genius then?

I wouldn't exactly say it would make you a little smarter, but try putting together some models when all the directions are in Japanese, now that is a challenge lol.

So just by the sheer amount of gundam and WH40K models i've made and are still making i should be the smartest person in the world by thursday...

I would like to think that it's making me smarter but all i'm getting out of it is a headache from all the paint and glue fumes.

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Posting on this forum is disabled.