Learn to Play Street Fighter for 50 Bucks an Hour

Learn to Play Street Fighter for 50 Bucks an Hour

image

Gamers with more money than skills can now trade the former for the latter with paid lessons from top-ranked professional Super Street Fighter 4 players on Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network.

When I was a kid, I took piano lessons. It never went anywhere because I absolutely detested practicing (a work ethic that got me where I am today) but maybe I'd have been more amenable to the idea if the lessons were for something I actually enjoyed, like, say, videogames. But come on, who's going to pay for videogame lessons?

Maybe somebody, especially if the teachers are "top SSF4 players" Justin Wong, Mike Ross, Martin "Marn" Phan and Ryan "Gootecks" Gutierrez. The four are offering paid lessons at a rate of $40 to $50 per hour, primarily on Xbox Live (Gootecks is also available on PSN), and each with a focus on a particular set of characters: Wong offers lessons in "tournament level characters" Rufus, Abel, Balrog and Makato, Ross handles E. Honda, Ken and Blanka, Phan specializes in Dudley, C. Viper and Abel, and Gutierrez does Balrog, Guile and Rose.

According to the quickie FAQ on EventHubs.com, payments must be made through PayPal at least 24 hours before the lesson is scheduled to begin. Skype is the preferred method of communication between student and teacher, and lessons will focus on each player's individual needs and interests. "It is your responsibility to tell your instructor what you need help with or want to know more about," the FAQ says. "If you have videos from a recent match that you want feedback on, please mention that in your initial email."

Forking over cash for videogame lessons apparently isn't anything new, but what makes this noteworthy is the "high profile" of the tutors. Wong has been a fixture at the Evolution Championship Series (aka Evo) since 2003 and took top spot in the Marvel vs. Capcom 2 competition in 2010, while Phan earned first place in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom and Ross placed fourth in the Super Street Fighter 4 competition. Gutierrez is also a top-ranked professional Street Fighter player who has launched several competitive tournaments and is set to appear, along with Ross and Wong, in the "fighting videogame scene documentary" I Got Next.

It's an impressive faculty, but 50 bucks an hour to learn how to play a videogame? Call me old fashioned but I think I'd rather pay for a year of Xbox Live Gold and figure it out for myself.

Permalink

I could honestly see myself paying for this at some point, I generally suck at fighting games, no matter which I play(except super smash bros, but that is different) especially online, in fact, out of the 30 matches I played in Soul Caliber 4 online, I won once, and that was barely, I sold that game after that.

Part of me is excited that something like this can happen, but really if you want too fork over that much money for lessons on a fighting game, I would at least pick BlazBlue, or Soul Calibur over SFIV,

I'd much rather have Xbox Live again or buy Blaz Blue and then get Xbox Live again. They don't even teach my characters. Akuma, Sakura, M. Bison (Dictator), and Gen are where it's at.

Really? They want 40$-50$ an hour?
...Good luck with that.

Or just mash random buttons,

Which is much more fun and costs significantly less!

Hmm, I play Rufus, so maybe I could pay $50 to let Wong instruct me.

That would be hilarious, because then I could throw as much garbage I'd want at him. I'd certainly pay for that. Yes, I'm part of the Wong-hate group..

If someone has the talent and dedication to become a tournament player, and they think that this would help them then I think they should go for it (I love fighting games but will only ever be an average-to above average player). In my experience an hour with a great teacher can save you many hours of self directed study, this goes for anything, though great teachers are a rare thing.

I do find the preference for skype a little strange when XBL has game and party chat. You would of course need a top notch connection for this to be worthwhile given the precise nature of high level play.

If you have $50 but don't have a ton of time to learn the ins and outs of the characters i imagine this could be a pretty canny investment in terms of $:fun.

And people say economics isn't useful in real life situations :-)

$50 only to get beat by some kid spamming moves.

Must be gutting.

I have no patience for such people at all.

I am a confident man in my life and this reflects totally towards gaming itself. An example:

When I first bought Gears of War, I was a really rookie regarding consoles. Never played a Third person shooter before, especially not with a rather massive cover system that plays a huge factor regarding movement and survival.

This is what happens. I move in with my Lancer, I see people rushing me, moving from cover to cover and blasting me from one inch away with a deadly shotgun blast. This will happen once or twice so rapidly I begin to lose interest in a game. But what happens during all of this, I am actually activily observing my opponents and the said tactics against me. Since this game has no perks or whatever unbalanced bullcrap, the choice of weapon, your reflex and movement is the key to survival.

After all of this, sitting away and doing anything beside gaming, I am beginning to reflect on my experiences and start to visualize multiple scenarios and try to figure out where I went wrong and could improve on. I knew the maps already and the power weapons, thus I could guess pretty much how people would rush and split up in each map. Visualizing all of this helped me to actually train myself without touching the game at all. Boom, I feel satisfied and content about my approach.

Now the Active Experimentation phase kicks is. This is where I actually try out everything I thought about. Naturally, no battle plan survives contact with the enemy, so what does every soldier or human being do? Adapt, remain flexible and move with the flow of the battle. Never miss a beat or skip an important step that will ensure survival. After repeating and doing everything step, I will soon learn what is wrong and what is actually feasible to do in any combat scenario". I call this the Evaluation and Feedback phase, the circle is now completed and it's a constant force that increases my skill anytime I use this process.

Boom, Straying Bullet just thought himself the merits of actually learning yourself and becoming experienced on your own.

And still, when I can safely say I am well on my way and have quite a impressive K/D ratio compared to most players, I don't turn my brain into a numb state. Everything I do or see, is still being repeated in the steps described above, as I move and battle more furious and respectable opponents, so do I learn from them and gain more and more experience.

It seems like a long post but this is pretty much how you are better off learning on your own with some quick tips and hints from other professional players.

While I wouldn't pay for this myself, I can see the appeal of it. If you live out in the middle of nowhere and are pretty good but think you're just short of tournament level, one session might be worth it.

My issue is with the training systems available for something like this in game.. or the lack thereof. If you could sit next to the guy and go over things in practice mode it would likely work a heck of a lot better than trying to explain things over the phone via VS matches.

I can't see this helping a totally new player much though, no matter how much money they spend. Of course, the advertisement does pretty much say this by requiring the trainee to have specific characters and questions in mind before they start, and to even mention providing match footage for use as a teaching tool.

That seems a little much, why would someone want to do that? I mean, just get some friends around, a couple beers. Jobs a good one!

None of them incites me to be even remotely re-interested in SSF4, so I'll pass. For all that, why not just release a separate DVD that includes character tips and strategies and what have you, like what Blazblue did last year for CT?

You know what is sad about this? They are doing this in the poorest way possible from a managerial point of view.

Sure they have the form of communication right for long distance and they have the secure form of payment but the one factor they have off is this statement:

"It is your responsibility to tell your instructor what you need help with or want to know more about," the FAQ says. "If you have videos from a recent match that you want feedback on, please mention that in your initial email."

That statement is only meant as an after lesson issue and demonstrates that these gentlemen(which I have had the pleasure of meeting Mr.Gootenks[great guy and is an open person not afraid to meet new people]) do not have a clear business plan to ensure a minimum level of satisfaction from the students. While yes it is good to personalize the teaching and the student should ask the teacher in their troubles but to ensure long term success you need a lesson plan.

These gentlemen might actually have better luck in forming an actual business online school and selling their services the same way you have anime voice actors creating their own schools covering the basics to the pro level because be it local or national there is always a market. The problem they will have is that I bet they actually lack the business know-how and financial resources to actually get a school started and hire the proper level of management to organize such a potential profitable business venture.

mattttherman3:
I could honestly see myself paying for this at some point, I generally suck at fighting games, no matter which I play(except super smash bros, but that is different) especially online, in fact, out of the 30 matches I played in Soul Caliber 4 online, I won once, and that was barely, I sold that game after that.

Honestly I don't think this is for people that really suck and have no idea what they are doing. (no offence intended)
I think it's intended to intermediate players that have a good understanding of the game but don't really know how they can further improve.

On another note if you want some help with fighting games, hit me up. I'll help you as best I can, for free!

PxDn Ninja:
Part of me is excited that something like this can happen, but really if you want too fork over that much money for lessons on a fighting game, I would at least pick BlazBlue, or Soul Calibur over SFIV,

It's generally accepted in the fighting game community that if you can get a deep understanding of any Street fighter game, then you should only be a few hours from learning the core concepts of any other fighting game.
So really if you decode to get these lessons then it will help both your Soul Calibur and Blazblue game.

The StarCraft community has had people doing stuff like this for a while now. The American progamer Geoff "INcontrol" Robinson started the trend by offering lessons, which eventually evolved into an entire organisation based on the concept called GosuCoaching.

While I personally wouldn't pay money for this, I can see the appeal. Some of these games are really hard to get very good at, so getting professional aid for such purpose certainly is helpful.

I love Street Fighter, but no way am I paying hard cash to become better at the game. What sort of fucking douchebag charges $50 an hour for videogame lessons?

I gotta be honest here.

When I saw the title of this article, I did a double whammy. $50 bucks. $50 bucks for professional training......................I'm at a loss of words. It's just that I would't have the money to do this. Nor would I want to.

Chapper:
Hmm, I play Rufus, so maybe I could pay $50 to let Wong instruct me.

That would be hilarious, because then I could throw as much garbage I'd want at him. I'd certainly pay for that. Yes, I'm part of the Wong-hate group..

This made me chuckle. I almost had to restrain myself from posting that EVO video of him versus that Adon player.

I'll let you all in on a super secret method for winning every fighting game ever, no matter what.

Put on a blind fold a press as many buttons as fast as you can.

TimeLord:
Or just mash random buttons,

Which is much more fun and costs significantly less!

I'd argue that getting off that 21 hit combo when you know what you're doing is far more satisfying. :3

I shoulda done this when teaching almost every fighting gamer at my college Blazblue. Lesson learned. :(

Or.... you could go look at the forums for these games for free and probably learn more. Am I the only one who thinks you look stupid selling or buying SF lessons?

TimeLord:
Or just mash random buttons,

Which is much more fun and costs significantly less!

You just summed up my opinion. There's no way I'd pay money to learn a game.

LustFull0ne:
I gotta be honest here.

When I saw the title of this article, I did a double whammy. $50 bucks. $50 bucks for professional training......................I'm at a loss of words. It's just that I would't have the money to do this. Nor would I want to.

Chapper:
Hmm, I play Rufus, so maybe I could pay $50 to let Wong instruct me.

That would be hilarious, because then I could throw as much garbage I'd want at him. I'd certainly pay for that. Yes, I'm part of the Wong-hate group..

This made me chuckle. I almost had to restrain myself from posting that EVO video of him versus that Adon player.

I watched the entire EVO stream with a couple of buddies, and oh my lord how much hype it was. I screamed in glee as I watched Wong get beaten by Vangief's Zangief (duh..) and then lost against Gamerbee's Adon in the loser's bracket. Unfortunately the stream cut of in the final between Daigo and Ricky Ortiz... But I hear Daigo won fair and square, which isn't a surprise, really.

Chapper:

LustFull0ne:
I gotta be honest here.

When I saw the title of this article, I did a double whammy. $50 bucks. $50 bucks for professional training......................I'm at a loss of words. It's just that I would't have the money to do this. Nor would I want to.

Chapper:
Hmm, I play Rufus, so maybe I could pay $50 to let Wong instruct me.

That would be hilarious, because then I could throw as much garbage I'd want at him. I'd certainly pay for that. Yes, I'm part of the Wong-hate group..

This made me chuckle. I almost had to restrain myself from posting that EVO video of him versus that Adon player.

I watched the entire EVO stream with a couple of buddies, and oh my lord how much hype it was. I screamed in glee as I watched Wong get beaten by Vangief's Zangief (duh..) and then lost against Gamerbee's Adon in the loser's bracket. Unfortunately the stream cut of in the final between Daigo and Ricky Ortiz... But I hear Daigo won fair and square, which isn't a surprise, really.

Even though I wasn't watching the whole stream, I caught some of the videos posted after. Yeah, Daigo did good.

But that Wong match, holy hell, I haven't seen that many stunned faces before. Needless to say, I hope more people notice that not everyone is unbeatable.

I know, it's been said many times before, but, "people need to stop picking only top tier. Fight with a more diverse range of characters. "

/rant.

OT: $50 dollars is still a ridiculous amount of money for training, in any game.

Well to be honest I say good luck to them. You got the skills might as well try and make some money and in this world who can say no to alittle extra money. Personnaly This is not my thing If I pay that much an hour I better be learning the real fighting moves in RL

how did they get so good? Yeah, practice, anyone can do it.

"50$ an hour"

AH HAHAHAHAHA!!!! AH HA AH AH HA!! HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

OH MY GOD THAT'S HILARIOUS!!! AH HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

For 50 Bucks an hour i could buy things far more entertaining that street fighting training...

So someone pays $50 an hour to get taught how to play Street Fighter, and in their first real match after all the schooling gets trounced by an opponent who is just button-mashing....

Y'know, I don't think this'll take off, myself.

Chapper:
I screamed in glee as I watched Wong get beaten by Vangief's Zangief (duh..) and then lost against Gamerbee's Adon in the loser's bracket

The best part about that was Vangief beat him using a pad instead of a stick. And also how Justin was talking about Adon being crap.

Honestly who the hell would pay $50 per hour for lessons? I got better at Street Fighter 4 with Ryu through practice, and hell, you're going to need to practice after the lessons anyway. You can learn the same amount from watching high level matches, and it costs a hell lot less.

somelameshite:

Chapper:
I screamed in glee as I watched Wong get beaten by Vangief's Zangief (duh..) and then lost against Gamerbee's Adon in the loser's bracket

The best part about that was Vangief beat him using a pad instead of a stick. And also how Justin was talking about Adon being crap.

Honestly who the hell would pay $50 per hour for lessons? I got better at Street Fighter 4 with Ryu through practice, and hell, you're going to need to practice after the lessons anyway. You can learn the same amount from watching high level matches, and it costs a hell lot less.

Yup, I love how some people manage to do well with pads in tournaments, and Vangief's standing ultra is amazing! Everyone thought that was impossible.

Adon isn't bad. No character is bad. It's how the player uses them.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here