College Using StarCraft to Teach Complex Management Skills

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Well always nice to see games being used in new and different places. But some of these class things sound like quite a stretch to me. Using StarCraft as a management tool?

"These are skills that every good StarCraft player needs, and that workers in real life management situations need as well. Just like having to manage a counter-measure to a rush of Zerg attacking your base, an employee at a bank might have to quickly manage what's possible and what's not when a crisis arises."

I see what he is saying but I mean seriously... who thinks like that, or more specifically who pulls on their game knowledge for situations like that? Looking at a case study which highlights the implementation of and repercussions of an actual management teams decided course of action in an actual business situation seems a little better avenue to illustrate something like a "bank crisis".

I'm not knocking using games in schools. Pairing games with some types of psychology study/topics seems like an interesting (and in some ways natural) fit. But comparisons between RTS resource strategies and business "crisis" management makes me think this guy is trying to pair his subject with games just cause...

bros, this is so smart because sending mindless soldiers into a fight to win is what business is all about. and having no worker/soldier revolts over pay, totally realistic. researching technology thats already there. very realistic. building buildings in secs and winning wars/battles in less than an hour.

bros, i think this has a potential to be a satire. on the modern workplace or how ppl take starcraft too seriously. srs business.

I dunno if anyone mentioned it, but the United States Air Force used Starcraft I to train new officers in quick thinking and out of the box thinking.

Bloodstain:

danpascooch:
I support Portal being studied as art, but I don't think there is much educational value to Starcraft, Don't get me wrong, I LOVE that game, but I don't think it has real world value.

It's not about the content. You sure don't need to know about Zerglings to be a good manager.
It's about the thinking. Considering multiple ressources and making decisions in a short time.

danpascooch:
It's like writing off an air hockey table as a tax deduction because it "helps your hand eye coordination" and you're a surgeon. It's a load of crap.

That actually sounds useful. I mean, you need two things to be a surgeon: The knowledge about the human body and hand-eye coordination. The latter could trained playing air hockey (although there sure are better methods to train it).

I know there are parallels between things you do in starcraft and things you do in real life (a really lose flimsy one, I mean "managing many things at once" can you get ANY broader than that!?) but my point is I don't think Starcraft can help TEACH you skills that can be translated into real-life advantages.

Credge:
There's nothing really managed in SC :|.

You spam harvesters until your mineral field is saturated (typically 3 harvesters per node) and you put 3 harvesters per gas geyser.

So...?

It's one thing to pick the right unit to counter what the enemy has. In the real world, it's not as simple as building infestors to counter MMM.

I'm pretty sure if you looked at the picture you'd see that they're using the ORIGINAL Starcraft to teach micro management, which is a lot harder since you're using 1998 scripting.

*thumbs up* i wanna go to this collage now!! I'd pass that class with flying colors xDD

danpascooch:
I support Portal being studied as art, but I don't think there is much educational value to Starcraft, Don't get me wrong, I LOVE that game, but I don't think it has real world value.

It's like writing off an air hockey table as a tax deduction because it "helps your hand eye coordination" and you're a surgeon. It's a load of crap.

If you listen to a Day9 daily, you'll get some introspective on how it applies. For example:

1) Macro is king. If you try to get too much of everything off of limited resources, you will lose. Yes, doing so may counter your opponent, but its a lot easier to just get more. This applies to the way that many Protoss players try to get a high-tech Colossus unit or two before they move out from their main base to expand. All the money they spend on the technology slows their initial macro so much that even though that Colossus may counter the enemy marine and marauder group, it will be flimsy and require careful micro to just survive.

2) Have a plan. Even if your plan isn't perfect for the scenario, a well executed plan will out-play someone who tries to counter it, but doesn't do it fast enough. If you know how to Banshee rush a zerg player well, the key moments you save with good execution can mean the difference between facing two queens (early anti-air) and three queens. This is also crucial in mirror match-ups where Terran plays Terran for example. Whoever gets more tanks and vikings faster and at the right times will claim victory.

3) Tricks can buy you time, but rarely win you the game. Forcefielding a ramp as a Protoss player can mean the difference between victory and defeat against an early 3-barracks push. It takes careful execution, but should give you an advantage over your enemy who has poured his early resources into military rather than economy.

There's plenty more, but that would take a while, so feel free to ask questions.

Hi,

Thanks very much for this comment. It help me to think about my ideals.

We also find them more same at: Time management techniques

Tks again and pls keep posting.

Burck:

danpascooch:
I support Portal being studied as art, but I don't think there is much educational value to Starcraft, Don't get me wrong, I LOVE that game, but I don't think it has real world value.

It's like writing off an air hockey table as a tax deduction because it "helps your hand eye coordination" and you're a surgeon. It's a load of crap.

If you listen to a Day9 daily, you'll get some introspective on how it applies. For example:

1) Macro is king. If you try to get too much of everything off of limited resources, you will lose. Yes, doing so may counter your opponent, but its a lot easier to just get more. This applies to the way that many Protoss players try to get a high-tech Colossus unit or two before they move out from their main base to expand. All the money they spend on the technology slows their initial macro so much that even though that Colossus may counter the enemy marine and marauder group, it will be flimsy and require careful micro to just survive.

2) Have a plan. Even if your plan isn't perfect for the scenario, a well executed plan will out-play someone who tries to counter it, but doesn't do it fast enough. If you know how to Banshee rush a zerg player well, the key moments you save with good execution can mean the difference between facing two queens (early anti-air) and three queens. This is also crucial in mirror match-ups where Terran plays Terran for example. Whoever gets more tanks and vikings faster and at the right times will claim victory.

3) Tricks can buy you time, but rarely win you the game. Forcefielding a ramp as a Protoss player can mean the difference between victory and defeat against an early 3-barracks push. It takes careful execution, but should give you an advantage over your enemy who has poured his early resources into military rather than economy.

There's plenty more, but that would take a while, so feel free to ask questions.

RebellionXXI:
Why is Judicator Aldaris showing up as the unit pic for a Terran structure?

But other than that, I think there might be something to this. I always used to suck at Starcraft, until I realized (basically) "Oh! I'm supposed to be THINKING when I play this game!".

Just to answer the quesiton, while a Terran base is on the screen, a Nexus is the structure currently selected. Note the wire frame at the bottom of the screen.

It seems like we're all a bit too focused on specifics here. I think the important thing is that one must be aware of several things at once and decide what to do with them on the fly. I can't say whether or not this was what the professor had in mind, but I don't think it is about being in work and going, "Hey, this is just like that thing I did in Starcraft!" I think it is more about the simple practice of focusing the brain on many things at once and making decisions with it. In other words, it is all about improving the brain's capacity to multifocus. The context in which it is used doesn't really matter.
Indeed, there is more to Starcraft than just that. As someone has mentioned already, there's also quick mouse dexterity and a full understanding of Starcraft fundamentals, but as long as those don't interfere with the prime directive it might work.

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