Pachter: Valve Will Offer Trade-ins on Steam

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Pachter: Valve Will Offer Trade-ins on Steam

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Analyst Michael Pachter predicts that Valve will soon let you trade in games that you've bought on Steam, for a small fee.

Steam is by far the most ubiquitous PC games download service that we've ever seen. Tons of people use it to play PC titles and keep their saved games on the cloud. But Michael Pachter, an analyst from Wedbush Morgan and outspoken pundit of the videogame industry, predicts that Valve will attempt to cash in on the used games market by allowing you to trade in games that you've purchased on Steam for credit that you can use to purchase other games. Steam itself will only take a small fee for such a transaction.

"Steam is phenomenal, it's a great service," Pachter told NowGamer. "Steam gives gamers enough other stuff so that they don't resent the fact they can't trade in their games. And you know, name all the Steam games that you've purchased that you've traded back in to somebody else for credit. Steam's about to let you do that supposedly, you know like trade and exchange, but they're going to take a fee from it."

Pachter has been wildly wrong with his predictions in the past, like a "premium" multiplayer service for Call of Duty, but sometimes he's spot on, like when he posited a new Twisted Metal game.

What do you guys think? Would you like Steam to be able to accept your old game, basically turning it off in your Games Library, in exchange for credit that you can use in purchasing another game?

It's so crazy that it just might make sense.

Source: NowGamer

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Actually, that would be awesome. DOOOOOOOOO EEEEEEEEET.

This has to be the dumbest prediction ever. It doesn't make sense, how do developers make money off of this?

And Valve has always been about developers.

That would be absolutely amazing.
I would love if a system like this was implemented.

Finally something that lets me trade in PC games.

That would be great. So many games I never play anymore...

This would be awesome. Specially for me since I have a great number of games I got as part of the Eidos pack that I don't want and never did want.

(Not that I wasted money buying it, it was dirt cheap over christmas time)

It would be cool, but I don't see how this will be practical for income with it being digital copies

Zer_:
This has to be the dumbest prediction ever. It doesn't make sense, how do developers make money off of this?

And Valve has always been about developers.

That small fee he mentioned, thats most likely what the developers would get. And besides, they already got your money when you bought the game, or when a friend bought it and gifted it to you.

I can see Valve trying something like that.

...actually, it sounds like a really good idea.

So they'll basically start doing what Green Man Gaming does already? Such innovation...

The_root_of_all_evil:
Actually, that would be awesome. DOOOOOOOOO EEEEEEEEET.

Agreed. I still can't play Fallout 3 on Steam because Steam lied to me about the minimum system requirements and I want (a portion of) my money back!

I love that idea. I have roughly $2300 worth of games on Steam, about 2/3 of which I'd be willing to trade in in a heartbeat. Even if the trade-in is only worth 20% of what you paid, I'd be able to get a few hundred dollars worth of new games with it.

Edit: Unfortunately, I doubt it's ever going to happen. It doesn't generate any money for anyone, so I can't see it actually going through. It doesn't give the Steam store another copy of whatever games you trade in (since you know, it's digital and all), and any games bought with Steam credit wouldn't actually get any money to the developer or Valve. I just can't see it coming to fruition.

Steam is already awesome. Allowing us to trade in games would elevate it to being perfect!

Surely something so incredible isn't really going to happen. The world has never been that nice to me...

TimeLord:

The_root_of_all_evil:
Actually, that would be awesome. DOOOOOOOOO EEEEEEEEET.

Agreed. I still can't play Fallout 3 on Steam because Steam lied to me about the minimum system requirements and I want (a portion of) my money back!

When a friend of mine couldn't get a game to work on his PC, Valve gave him "Steam credit" for the game so that he could purchase something else.

JediMB:

TimeLord:

The_root_of_all_evil:
Actually, that would be awesome. DOOOOOOOOO EEEEEEEEET.

Agreed. I still can't play Fallout 3 on Steam because Steam lied to me about the minimum system requirements and I want (a portion of) my money back!

When a friend of mine couldn't get a game to work on his PC, Valve gave him "Steam credit" for the game so that he could purchase something else.

...........

*opens Steam*

While that's pretty useless to me now. I see myself loving it in the future.

another reason to not use Steam?

first thing pops into mind if an unknown user with malicious intent had access to someone else's account.

Greg Tito:
Steam itself will only take a small fee for such a trnasaction.

Small typo there Greg.

Would be kinda cool if could trade in a game for another...like fallout 3, which doesn't work on my computer FU bethesda customer support and not fixing it for me D:

Yes please do this Valve, this would be awesome.

Do it.
I dare ya!

Seems like a good idea to me. I would finally be able to remove GTA 4 from my games list.

It's great, but then, the logistics of it all would be a nightmare. How do you make sure that the trade-ins are of equal value when there always seem to be a sale?

That would be amazing, it's something I really want to see, because right now I do actually need it. I have L4D on Steam, but only found after buying it that my computer is too slow to run it properly. So if I could, I'd trade it in, and use the money to buy the same game but on the Xbox, and play through XBL instead. Of course, I can't do that, but if I could just trade it in for a bit of credit that I could perhaps put towards some awesome Steam indie games, it would be so worth it... :D

Oh, and added to that is the fact that my main concern about buying downloadable games instead of a hard copy is that with a hard copy I can trade them in, whereas with downloads I don't have the right to sell that on later when I get bored of it. So I distrust downloads anyway through that (although thankfully Steam does indeed do plenty to make up for it), and this idea would go one step further to easing my fears about it, to be honest...

Can someone explain to me how this would work? How do they stop you from copying the game's folders and then trading it in?

Ok. Maybe because it's late, but I cant see how money would result from this. Is the "small fee" in actual money because otherwise there would be no gain to Steam.

I don't think this will happen.
PC gamers have been without trade-ins for like 20 years now, we really don't care.

What I WOULD like to see is a rental service.

So I can give Steam 5-10 dollars, they give me a game for 3-7 days and then after that it will be deleted from my HD.

Sounds good, but I just don't see it happening.

If it happened on Steam, a lot of the major publishers would most likely pull their inventory.

I assume this would only apply to Steam games that you actually bought off of Steam (as opposed to ones that are supported by Steam, but you installed with a disc)?

TylerC:
Can someone explain to me how this would work? How do they stop you from copying the game's folders and then trading it in?

Well it will be illegal to keep a copy of it I guess. After all it won't be that different from pirating the game. If you don't put a crack on it steam will not authorize your game and you won't be able to play it.

This idea doesn't make sense. they charge as much as they do for a reason: that's how much it costs to make these games. Every once in a while I'll come back to this idea, and I always reach the same problem. Valve doesn't lose money when they let you have access to a game, and tehy don't gai money by taking it away. Therefore when you, say, pay 5 dollars to trade in you're copy of HL2 for 20 dollars worth of credit (in which case you are no true gamer, but anyway), Valve is essentially charging you 5 dollars for 20 dollars worth of content with no other revenue stream to make up for it. No matter how little money Valve will give you, the same problem always arises.

If it did happen, I'd be for it. I have so many games that seemed like a good idea at a time and are now sitting like rocks in my library. If I'm not doing anything with them, they have no value to me, and since many of them I'm unlikely to actually want to play anything I could get, even a partial credit, would be nice.

Granted, to be fair, they'd probably have to take into account the price you paid for the game when you bought it vs the price it is now. Admittedly I tend to do most of my Steam shopping during their wonderful, productivity-slaying sales, so I get the games for a low price before they jump back up. I wouldn't expect to get the same amount of credit as someone else if I paid five dollars for a game and they paid twenty for it. I guess they just have transaction records?

That would be great, actually - I have a couple Steam games I would totally trade if I could.

What with all the steam deals. Imagine you bought an L4D2 4pack last week, when it was 3x6.99 euros (yay, belgium -.-).
It's reverted back to 20 euros for just a single copy of L4D2. How much would you get back for turning in one of those L4D2 copies, 50% of the cost? You'd either be making a profit off the steam deals, or hardly getting anything back (if they'd give only 25% back or something)...

Wouldn't call it plausible, really.

And so Valve removes the last barrier between them and open-faced honesty. My two cents says that:
A. This is going to kill the "you license it, you don't own it" argument for download software, and help make a case for first-sale rights.

B. Eventually, they'll add game trading services, letting gamers go gamer-to-gamer (for a cut of the sale profits, of course).

C. Any download service that doesn't offer this is going to be left high-and-dry within five years. Expect to see it in Gamer's Gate and Direct2Drive, at the least.

D. I am now regretting sending on my extra copies of Half-life 2 and Episode 1 when I bought the Orange Box.

EDIT: If this happens. I was under the impression for some reason that Pachter was Valve's CEO. Stupid me.

"It's so crazy that it just might make sense."

Crazy? Nope.

It's just a form of customer support (digital distribution style) that has been vacant in recent years.

Of course Valve is going to profit, from what has already been proven, a great way to make money.

Johnny come lately is finally stepping up.

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