"I Didn't Think It Would Be This Hard," Says Move Designer

"I Didn't Think It Would Be This Hard," Says Move Designer

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Waving your arm is simple, but making a controller that can follow that movement is super-tricky, says the designer behind the PlayStation Move.

To the casual observer, Sony's new motion controller Move is a glowing ball on a stick, with a few buttons thrown in for good measure. Of course, it's a lot more complicated than that, and in an interview with Famitsu, designer Yoshio Miyazaki said that he was surprised at how difficult it was to get Move actually working.

Miyazaki worked with Sony Worldwide Studios boss Shuhei Yoshida and said that Yoshida had commented that he had never been on a project that had gone through so many revisions. He said that a trifecta of hardware issues, software problems and budgetary concerns meant that Move's design was constantly changing and evolving.

Move's price tag proved to be tricky, as Sony was convinced that unless they could keep the bundle - controller, camera and software - under 10,000 yen, or approximately $125, then there wasn't a hope of it selling. Miyazaki said the manufacturing budget for Move was based on that number, and that his initial reaction was that the task was impossible. But with some retooling and a reduction in the number of components, Miyazaki said that his team was able to get Move's manufacturing costs within the limits that Sony had set.

Miyazaki also admitted that he underestimated the challenge involved in getting everything to work, saying that he had no idea that getting accurate data from the sensors would be so difficult. Actually getting the sensor to talk to the PS3 was easy, he said, but the data was affected by changes in temperature and other environmental conditions, and it took both hardware revisions and the assistance of the software developers in minimizing the variation.

Despite Move's release last month, Miyazaki doesn't consider Sony's work to be over. Move is a part of Sony's long-term strategy for the company, and Miyazaki hopes that people will check it out as more and more Move compatible games become available.

Source: via 1up

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And yet it's still an exercise in cloning the functionality of the Wii.

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

Take a look at the Wii, VERY few games utilise the control as anything other than a gimmick or to replace a button press. Even one of their core titles, SSBB, was designed for the GC controller because of the limitations of the Wiimote and nunchuck.

Obligatory "That's what she said!" to the title.

Aethren:
Obligatory "That's what she said!" to the title.

Damn you, ninjas, you win again!

I honestly can't imagine it would be so difficult; it's basically just a Wii remote with the camera and sensor bar swapped round.

Scrumpmonkey:

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

I wouldn't say they are always anti-immersion.

When I played Metroid Prime and Prime 2 with the Wii controls, I was much more immersed than I ever was playing the Gamecube version. It just felt natural.

Motion controls can aid in immersion when used properly. For instance...

Shaking the Wiimote to do ANYTHING is unimmersive.

Scrumpmonkey:
And yet it's still an exercise in cloning the functionality of the Wii.

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

Take a look at the Wii, VERY few games utilise the control as anything other than a gimmick or to replace a button press. Even one of their core titles, SSBB, was designed for the GC controller because of the limitations of the Wiimote and nunchuck.

Now you can knock Microsoft and Sony for trying to cash in on the motion control "fever" but Nintendo never saw it as a "money making machine." Of course they wanted to make a lot of money but I don't think they saw motion control as something that would do that for them.

However there are, as you pointed out, a surprising number of really good Wii games that don't even use the motion control.

Scrumpmonkey:
And yet it's still an exercise in cloning the functionality of the Wii.

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

Take a look at the Wii, VERY few games utilise the control as anything other than a gimmick or to replace a button press. Even one of their core titles, SSBB, was designed for the GC controller because of the limitations of the Wiimote and nunchuck.

Well yeah but the Wii ultimately isn't capable of any more fidelity than that without the Motion+. Throw in a market that is entirely made up of Nintendo fans and casual gamers perfectly happy with one button gaming and there's no reason anything else would get made, aside from blind optimism on one side or another.

But with high fidelity controls motion gaming really is capable of some exciting games that are difficult to translate to a joypad. Strategy games is the most obvious genre but looking at the tech demos there's some fresh potential for totally new experiences. Okay right now all you can really get is Sony Sports Resort, Resident Evil 5 and Heavy Rain, but the potential is still there.

Onyx Oblivion:

Scrumpmonkey:

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

I wouldn't say they are always anti-immersion.

When I played Metroid Prime and Prime 2 with the Wii controls, I was much more immersed than I ever was playing the Gamecube version. It just felt natural.

Motion controls can aid in immersion when used properly. For instance...

Shaking the Wiimote to do ANYTHING is unimmersive.

Well yes using them as an IR pointer is not un-immersive as it's samll movements trasnalted onto screen in a natural way when combined with button presses, like using a mouse really. It's only really a small part of 'motion control' and one that gives it a usage with FPS, something paradoxically the Wii ended up with VERY few of.

I don't see this being the main way kinect and Move are used, their features are geared towards much bigger gestures and not sadly towards the idea of an "Advnaced light gun" which is really all i can see that motion controls have given us that is useful so far (and even then, as i said, it's really only as much 'motion control' as a mouse)

The tendacy for gimmicks (and the frankly shit we have seen so far) is just too strong for me to be anything but contemptious of Microsoft and Sony's cynical attempt to clone some of thae Wii caual magic.

There are bigger problems in gaming to tackle (mainly the fact that we have yet to see it's real flourishing as a story and character driven medium and see a script that both shows games can be as compelling as films in every way but also show it's distinct advantages as an interactive medium) and motion control just side-steps them all together.

Scrumpmonkey:
And yet it's still an exercise in cloning the functionality of the Wii.

Im in the yhatzee camp when it comes to motion contol. They are anti-immersion and essentially simplifying of games and gaming; the switch has more to do with a percived money making machine than it does with designers being unhappy with current control schemes.

Take a look at the Wii, VERY few games utilise the control as anything other than a gimmick or to replace a button press. Even one of their core titles, SSBB, was designed for the GC controller because of the limitations of the Wiimote and nunchuck.

couldn't agree more. And god is it buggy, my roommate has a wii and constantly naggin me to play wii games cuz i'm so anti-motion conrol and i haven't seen one that isn't better when u play with the gamecube controller. using the wii-mote guarentees that the game will misunderstand aproximately 3 commands out of every two i give it(lol, half serious. Don't know how many times that thing has jumped, or punched or whatever, when i didn't tell it to do anything at all) and it's a far slower reaction time to flick that wii-mote than it is to hit a.

What game did he develop for the Move? If the design of the Move would be changing over the course of the development, of course it'd be a bit difficult to develop for it.

On the Move itself, it's an interesting piece of technology for sure. I wouldn't be surprised if it made its way into my home sometime, but probably not too soon. It's got potential alright, and it's good to see Sony taking the "slow-n-steady" approach they did with the PS3, and it's lookin' like a good strategy for them.

Let's see what happens.

Just imagine how much harder it would've been to make if Nintendo hadn't done it first...

Jumplion:
What game did he develop for the Move? If the design of the Move would be changing over the course of the development, of course it'd be a bit difficult to develop for it.

On the Move itself, it's an interesting piece of technology for sure. I wouldn't be surprised if it made its way into my home sometime, but probably not too soon. It's got potential alright, and it's good to see Sony taking the "slow-n-steady" approach they did with the PS3, and it's lookin' like a good strategy for them.

Let's see what happens.

He was the guy that developed the move controller I think, that's what I got from the article.

Redingold:

Aethren:
Obligatory "That's what she said!" to the title.

Damn you, ninjas, you win again!

I honestly can't imagine it would be so difficult; it's basically just a Wii remote with the camera and sensor bar swapped round.

damn you double ninjas

I think that building a serious game for people to enjoy just based ob these controllers would be a challange. However, if you can design something for it and it works then good on you. If you can get serious gamers intrested in it and like it then even better.

 

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