PS3 Pirates Counter Sony's Anti-Piracy Counter-Update

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 NEXT
 

Misho-:

SaturdayS:
There's no games on mars. I'd stick with piracy.

Not yet... Thanks to pirates...

We has them now thanks to pirates. Available in sandstorm free local.

PeePantz:

John Funk:

Back in September, Sony updated the PS3 firmware to version 3.42 in order to kill the functionality of PS Jailbreak, a USB mod tool that allowed users to play illegally copied games from the PS3's hard drive. It continued with version 3.50, which hit along with EA's Medal of Honor.

I'm not sure why Medal of Honor was mentioned. Very unnecessary. If it was for a time reference, the date or even late October would suffice.

The update was on the Medal of Honor disk, any pirate who put the disk in was forced to upgrade of not play MoH, thats why it was mentioned.

Aright... If you say so, still I rather side against pirates than with pirates, 'cause they are just being dicks at this point.

Ahlycks:

Heart of Darkness:
It's a vicious circle. An exercise in futility that only shows that this method of DRM isn't working. Stop investing in this failed scheme and get to work on something better, Sony, if you don't want people hacking your system.

Dude I have not seen you post for months! Hey!

Anyway, meh. I don't know, I don't think the people that pirate stuff like this would be willing to put there skills to use elsewhere no matter how much you try to change them. That is of course if they are not doing anything else already.

Those guys are fucking impressive. However, i'm glad i'm not them. Can't imagen getting much chicks with skills such as those, huh?

Actually, I have been posting: in forum games in forums that have fallen out of the queue for some reason. Anyway.

I was mainly referring to Sony in my post, but the people who are hacking this should be able to put their skills to use to create systems that are more protected from hacks like this. And you don't know if they're getting girls or not--not all programmers conform to the stereotype of pasty white nerd living in mom's basement. >.> Then again, it wouldn't surprise me if they were.

John Funk:

Heart of Darkness:
It's a vicious circle. An exercise in futility that only shows that this method of DRM isn't working. Stop investing in this failed scheme and get to work on something better, Sony, if you don't want people hacking your system.

Actually, I'd say that a method of DRM that went unhacked for a good five years did a pretty good job, wouldn't you?

Put another way: A determined thief can break pretty much any lock you have on your apartment/house/whatever, just as a determined pirate can crack any DRM. But you wouldn't say that locks and home security are pointless, would you? They stop someone from just idly wandering in and walking out with your stuff. Similarly, DRM may not stop a determined pirate, but it probably does its job in dissuading some people who think "eh, cracking it is too complicated."

So no, I'd think that for this, it actually does its job pretty well.

Oh, no, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that DRM's useless. If the DRM on the PS3 served it's purpose for five years, then that's fantastic--it means we're slowly moving towards the ideal goal of unhackable software/firmware. I'm just saying that Sony's probably going to be better off accepting the fact that the PS3 has been hacked and putting that knowledge to use when they craft the DRM for the PS4 or the next PSP.

To extend your analogy, a lock on a house that works for five years might have served its job admirably, but you're not going to keep using it once someone breaks it. Sure, you can fix it, but unless you start replacing parts, it's going to be structurally weaker than it what it was before it broke. Sony's response to the hacks seems to just be slapping duct tape on the lock and hoping that that's enough to stop people from breaking into their home.

It did it's job well, but now it's finished. It's been hacked. Unless the programming behind the DRM is completely rewritten, the pirates are just going to keep finding their way in.

the article reads like the Pirates are losing. That is news to me! Go Sony. :P

So they figured out how to de-patch a PS3 but still havent figured out how to get 3.42+ to work. Interesting development indeed.

Prof. Monkeypox:
The pirates obviously have some good programmers on their side. If those guys actually used their skills for something good (as Mr. Funk noted) they'd be sure to make tons of money. Enough that they could afford to pay for the games, and wouldn't need to pirate them in the first place (hell, they could buy copies for all their friends too). I'm genuinely starting to think people like this just get their jollies from pissing off electronics companies.

*Shepard Renegade voice* You assume everyone on this planet wants to get rich and have money. That's cute.

SaturdayS:
There's no games on mars. I'd stick with piracy.

What a stupid statement.

If we got to Mars, we'd need computers everywhere. Where there are computers, there are games.

I'm rooting for Sony.

I am honestly surprised that Sony is actually keeping up so well. Well, god speed to you. The sooner we can cure this piracy the better.

John Funk:

Heart of Darkness:
It's a vicious circle. An exercise in futility that only shows that this method of DRM isn't working. Stop investing in this failed scheme and get to work on something better, Sony, if you don't want people hacking your system.

Actually, I'd say that a method of DRM that went unhacked for a good five years did a pretty good job, wouldn't you?

Put another way: A determined thief can break pretty much any lock you have on your apartment/house/whatever, just as a determined pirate can crack any DRM. But you wouldn't say that locks and home security are pointless, would you? They stop someone from just idly wandering in and walking out with your stuff. Similarly, DRM may not stop a determined pirate, but it probably does its job in dissuading some people who think "eh, cracking it is too complicated."

So no, I'd think that for this, it actually does its job pretty well.

When I was younger, I remember seeing a couple of places rate locks in terms of time it takes to break in. The idea was that any lock could be broken into, but those which took more than 60 seconds (I think) were the safest because of the time constraints of breaking in without being detected.

Just came to mind. there's certainly an argument for the deterrent effect.

This was as inevitable as both the zombie apocalypse and the robot uprising.

The only question I have is which will come first.

If these determined pirates would only put their attention to other things, we'd probably be on Mars by now.

I find that ludicrous.

Imagine what would Windows 7, software in general, even hardware, if it weren't for those pirates exposing security leaks, forcing manufacturers and software companies to code PROPERLY! To think outside the box.

Now, imagine if humanity hadn't had those tinkerers and side-thinking individuals that, throughout history, going far back when saber-tooth tigers roamed the land, decided that it wasn't worth it. That it was just a feeble attempt, not worth the issue or work, that it just was good the way it is. Yeah. Maybe we'd be out of our trees by now.

The fact is, even if I don't agree with the way they do things, they do things. That's what matters. They have a passion to "break" those barriers and in some sort of way, we should be grateful to them for forcing those people to come up with new way of protecting their investments. Now, I agree that some came up with some pretty bad ideas (look at Ubiscrap), but the fact remains that if it weren't for those pirates we'd be gouged even more and mark my words, things will only get "better".

John Funk:

Heart of Darkness:
It's a vicious circle. An exercise in futility that only shows that this method of DRM isn't working. Stop investing in this failed scheme and get to work on something better, Sony, if you don't want people hacking your system.

Actually, I'd say that a method of DRM that went unhacked for a good five years did a pretty good job, wouldn't you?

Put another way: A determined thief can break pretty much any lock you have on your apartment/house/whatever, just as a determined pirate can crack any DRM. But you wouldn't say that locks and home security are pointless, would you? They stop someone from just idly wandering in and walking out with your stuff. Similarly, DRM may not stop a determined pirate, but it probably does its job in dissuading some people who think "eh, cracking it is too complicated."

So no, I'd think that for this, it actually does its job pretty well.

I am for anti-piracy measures but this is not a good analogy.

It's much easier to crack DRM software than to break into someone's house. And even easier to get away with it. You also don't have to think about things like when the owner might get back or something. It's all on your computer.

Loonerinoes:

Prof. Monkeypox:
The pirates obviously have some good programmers on their side. If those guys actually used their skills for something good (as Mr. Funk noted) they'd be sure to make tons of money. Enough that they could afford to pay for the games, and wouldn't need to pirate them in the first place (hell, they could buy copies for all their friends too). I'm genuinely starting to think people like this just get their jollies from pissing off electronics companies.

*Shepard Renegade voice* You assume everyone on this planet wants to get rich and have money. That's cute.

If only I got that reference...
kidding.
Anyway, there's hobby tinkering, and then there's helping pirates. I don't agree with the latter.

Assuming paragon voice: "Some relevant Com. Shepard quote."

Honestly, this comes as little surprise - it's part of the ongoing war against piracy (or, if you're on the other side, the war against copyright law).

Or rather: One other side to this argument: How about being on the side of "just wanting to make my PS3 more functional for me?" You know, that system has upgradeable memory, and Sony is telling me I don't have the right to use the system like a computer and simply copy my PS3 games to the system? Instead, I have to swap games continually. The reason I haven't added any variety to my game-play is because I have to swap disks and wait for the system to load them...slowly. I know that is a minor gripe, but that system is a really advanced *computer*, so shouldn't I be able to use it like one? Hell, Netflix opted-out of swapping in the Netflix DVD when you want to watch streaming content through the PS3 because it was more efficient. Why can't Sony allow its loyal users to simply copy games to the system?

Given that the release of FW 3.50 was rumored to be one of the reasons behind the eleventh-hour delay of Gran Turismo 5, it's entirely possible that an emergency firmware update might crash the racer's impending release date into a wall. Which, given how often that game has been delayed thus far, would just be part for the course, really.
AND
If these determined pirates would only put their attention to other things, we'd probably be on Mars by now.

There is a two-pronged solution to this rat-race: Sony should instead focus on making a better first-party games, and start telling third-party game makers to make better games, too. Sony should also allow people to copy games to the hard drive. Seriously. Computers have been able to do that for decades now. If Sony did this, there would be less reason for people to "pirate games" by copying them to the system. Sony would have less to worry about if they tried a hands-off approach to how they treated its own loyal customers. In turn, they wouldn't risk releasing a "patch" (DRM software) that would ruin the functionality of a random assortment of games.

Come on Sony (And MicroSoft and Nintendo), there will always been pirates. There always will be pirates. If you all actually made stable, reliable systems (which you three do), offered quick firmware updates that were not focused on DRM, and made better games, you all will pretty much reduce piracy.

Heart of Darkness:

John Funk:

Heart of Darkness:
It's a vicious circle. An exercise in futility that only shows that this method of DRM isn't working. Stop investing in this failed scheme and get to work on something better, Sony, if you don't want people hacking your system.

Actually, I'd say that a method of DRM that went unhacked for a good five years did a pretty good job, wouldn't you?

Put another way: A determined thief can break pretty much any lock you have on your apartment/house/whatever, just as a determined pirate can crack any DRM. But you wouldn't say that locks and home security are pointless, would you? They stop someone from just idly wandering in and walking out with your stuff. Similarly, DRM may not stop a determined pirate, but it probably does its job in dissuading some people who think "eh, cracking it is too complicated."

So no, I'd think that for this, it actually does its job pretty well.

Oh, no, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that DRM's useless. If the DRM on the PS3 served it's purpose for five years, then that's fantastic--it means we're slowly moving towards the ideal goal of unhackable software/firmware. I'm just saying that Sony's probably going to be better off accepting the fact that the PS3 has been hacked and putting that knowledge to use when they craft the DRM for the PS4 or the next PSP.

To extend your analogy, a lock on a house that works for five years might have served its job admirably, but you're not going to keep using it once someone breaks it. Sure, you can fix it, but unless you start replacing parts, it's going to be structurally weaker than it what it was before it broke. Sony's response to the hacks seems to just be slapping duct tape on the lock and hoping that that's enough to stop people from breaking into their home.

It did it's job well, but now it's finished. It's been hacked. Unless the programming behind the DRM is completely rewritten, the pirates are just going to keep finding their way in.

Ah, fair enough. I see your point now.

First off, let me clear that Pirates Rule. They are those brilliant guys and gals, who can show anyone the old saying "No system is safe" (hackers, C&C: Generals). I particularly remember when Prince of Persia: Sands of time came out with their awesome-uncrackable Starforce protection. It got cracked. In 8 minutes. So let me see, millions of dollars waisted, game released, awesome protection and some guy sits down and finds a way through it in 480seconds the time it takes to make hardboiled eggs. Whats the lesson? Don't try to defend it next time. Though almost never learned so now we have this exercise in Stupidity. Companies make new protections that get immediately cracked. I ask you, if there was NO protection, would you pirate the game instead of buying it? For me the answer is obvious, when you appreciate something, you pay for it. So instead the money for anti-piracy could be invested in better writing, dialog, online support or whatever. If you say that you only pay for games, because you can't pirate them, thats sad.

Case and point Unreal Tournament 3. Protection: none; A simple CD key allows you to play online, thats it. World of Warcraft doesn't even have a CD key, requires just an active account to play. I'm sure that both Epic Games and Blizzard make tons of money and waste none on protections, that someone can break while making breakfast.

Why do Pirates like making our lives harder?

I think the best thing to do, is that game companies should get in on a ruse of sorts. Over the next couple of years, game companies should take a dive, then announce piracy made their games unprofitable, then come back later. Hopefully, in the course of things it would provoke some good old vigilante justice. To be honest, I just think piracy would best be stopped with harsher punishments for people who pirate games.

I do not understand why people pirate games? Yes, free, but if these people are smart enough to come up with these ways, they should be smart enough to realise that if all starts pirating developers will stop making innovating games and just play it veeeery safe. Yes, it could get even worse than now... You really want that? Pirates are the lowest form of life IMO.

binnsyboy:
I think the best thing to do, is that game companies should get in on a ruse of sorts. Over the next couple of years, game companies should take a dive, then announce piracy made their games unprofitable, then come back later. Hopefully, in the course of things it would provoke some good old vigilante justice. To be honest, I just think piracy would best be stopped with harsher punishments for people who pirate games.

Developers should put bounties on the worst pirates, not only would it be legal to hunt them down, but you'd get paid so you can BUY MORE GAMES! MWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

N.1 Ninja Of 2010:
10, 9, 8, 7, 6...

Come on, Sony!

Get back up, you can't throw in the towel this late in the fight!

I think you are confused. They count from 1 to 10 in boxing.

Jeronus:

N.1 Ninja Of 2010:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5...

Come on, Sony!

Get back up, you can't throw in the towel this late in the fight!

I think you are confused. They count from 1 to 10 in boxing.

I don't know what you're talking about.

*Shifty eyes*

Gud on ya mates. Crack the crack the crack crack crack...

Pirates are the first reason the "Other OS" got removed. Piracy and pirate who proclaim they are defending whatever right or heroic duty. Just saying, in the end, no party will be satisfied because of their actions.

Sounds like Sony needs to buy a couple defense companies and put together some hit squads.

It's just impressive how far people will go to not give the companies the money they deserve (in most cases). These people have brilliant minds, but they should be killed before some extreme evil power sees their potential and puts them to use in developing a black hole generator.

"Sure, the boys in Ryan's lab can make it hack-proof. But that don't mean we ain't gonna hack it."

Oh Bioshock you summed up their feelings so easily, anyway can't be that hard to hack things all you do is press a bunch of lighted up buttons or rub some omni gel on it.

Question: Why can't they just develop a hardware/software or whatever that will completely shut down the console when any modification is done to the system without the proper authentication from sony? Maybe that's what they're doing, but it seems like that would be pretty difficult if not impossible to avoid, especially if sony kept records of all authorized changes and checked the console for anything that didn't match the database when you went online. I'm no programmer, but it seems like that would work. Anyone here know if that's what they are doing, or if it wouldn't work for some reason?

SO you mean the pirates aren't giving up? Who would have thought that.
Neither side will ever give up so its a matter of back and forth with technology. So long as you have it, someone wants it.

spartan231490:
Question: Why can't they just develop a hardware/software or whatever that will completely shut down the console when any modification is done to the system without the proper authentication from sony? Maybe that's what they're doing, but it seems like that would be pretty difficult if not impossible to avoid, especially if sony kept records of all authorized changes and checked the console for anything that didn't match the database when you went online. I'm no programmer, but it seems like that would work. Anyone here know if that's what they are doing, or if it wouldn't work for some reason?

It wouldnt work because pirates would undoubtedly find a way to hack it out, no DRM has ever succeeded.

xhable:
These guys aren't trying to copy games for theft or personal gain, they are trying to subvert the system so that they can share games with their friends. The game companies business model is at fault if it relies upon people not sharing the commodity.

I hope you know how dumb you sound. Literally the only way to make what you said true is if the pirates subverted the system and then immediately deleted whatever they downloaded. Otherwise it is automatically for theft or personal gain. Either they distribute it out illegally to others, which is theft, or they keep it for themselves which is both theft AND personal gain. How dare the game companies try to sell their wares rather than let people obtain them for free. Damn their profit oriented business model! They should be a charity where thousands of people put in millions of hours of work to create a video game and then distribute it for free! Get started on that and let me know how it goes.

John Funk:
PS3 Pirates Counter Sony's Anti-Piracy Counter-Update

image

Sony's PS3 firmware update to foil the infamous PS Jailbreak has been itself foiled.

Back in September, Sony updated the PS3 firmware to version 3.42 in order to kill the functionality of PS Jailbreak, a USB mod tool that allowed users to play illegally copied games from the PS3's hard drive. It continued with version 3.50, which hit along with EA's Medal of Honor.

This wasn't enough to deter a determined pirate, however. According to Engadget, the makers of PS Jailbreak have updated the device to function with firmware versions 3.42, 3.50, "and beyond."

Honestly, this comes as little surprise - it's part of the ongoing war against piracy (or, if you're on the other side, the war against copyright law). One group develops a counter for the other's technology that works until the second group unleashes its counter-counter, rinse and repeat. Sony is undoubtedly going to release a new firmware update that stymies the PS Jailbreak yet again, until PS Jailbreak cracks that one, too.

Given that the release of FW 3.50 was rumored to be one of the reasons behind the eleventh-hour delay of Gran Turismo 5, it's entirely possible that an emergency firmware update might crash the racer's impending release date into a wall. Which, given how often that game has been delayed thus far, would just be part for the course, really.

If these determined pirates would only put their attention to other things, we'd probably be on Mars by now.

Update: Also according to Engadget, this will not actually function with games that require FW 3.42 and 3.50 - rather, it forces the PS3 down to the hackable FW 3.40. This only allows pirates to play older games, not the new ones that mandate the latest firmware.

So really, this isn't as much of a setback for Sony as it could have been - for now.

(Engadget)

Permalink

So in other words nothing has changed and jailbreakers can play older games but not newer ones just like before? Is it just me or is everyone making a big fuss out of pretty much nothing?

Laxman9292:

xhable:
These guys aren't trying to copy games for theft or personal gain, they are trying to subvert the system so that they can share games with their friends. The game companies business model is at fault if it relies upon people not sharing the commodity.

I hope you know how dumb you sound. Literally the only way to make what you said true is if the pirates subverted the system and then immediately deleted whatever they downloaded. Otherwise it is automatically for theft or personal gain. Either they distribute it out illegally to others, which is theft, or they keep it for themselves which is both theft AND personal gain. How dare the game companies try to sell their wares rather than let people obtain them for free. Damn their profit oriented business model! They should be a charity where thousands of people put in millions of hours of work to create a video game and then distribute it for free! Get started on that and let me know how it goes.

Actually their is little to say the break is for the purposes of piracy it's more the case that the ability to run unsigned code for homebrew software also allows copied games to run.

The lockdown is what forces developers to pay the royalties and devkits required for PS3 development, Sony is far more concerned with not getting into a situation like nintendo had in the cartridges days of the snes where anyone in a place like china could develop thier own titles for the system with no money going to the platform owner.

DRM of this nature is the same as nintendos "seal of quality" a paper version to denote that the cartridge was an authentic licenced product, because connecting copper tabs were not protectable in those days

blakfayt:

PeePantz:

John Funk:

Back in September, Sony updated the PS3 firmware to version 3.42 in order to kill the functionality of PS Jailbreak, a USB mod tool that allowed users to play illegally copied games from the PS3's hard drive. It continued with version 3.50, which hit along with EA's Medal of Honor.

I'm not sure why Medal of Honor was mentioned. Very unnecessary. If it was for a time reference, the date or even late October would suffice.

The update was on the Medal of Honor disk, any pirate who put the disk in was forced to upgrade of not play MoH, thats why it was mentioned.

Ahhh, I see. Thank you. It really confused me and oddly was (very slightly) eating away at me.

And soon Sony becomes a company that does nothing more than release firmware updates to stop PS Jailbreak and "Classics HD" collections. Well it was nice knowing you when you weren't acting like some crazy old lady with 50 cats, Sony.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Posting on this forum is disabled.