Sony Blocks Hacked PS3s From PSN

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Sony Blocks Hacked PS3s From PSN

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Having your cake and eating it - also known as hacking your PS3 and still going online - has suddenly gotten very expensive.

Hackers are a resourceful bunch, and despite Sony's best efforts to stop them, they've still found ways to connect to PSN, even with jailbroken consoles. But now it seems that those halcyon days are over, as Sony has patched the holes in its fence that were allowing hackers to get in.

This isn't the same thing as Microsoft's annual sweep for modded Xbox 360s, as Sony doesn't seem to be blacklisting consoles. Instead, it appears that Sony has fixed the exploits that were allowing owners of hacked and jailbroken PS3s to use PSN. There were apparently two main methods of getting online with a hacked console. The first method involved manually changing the domain name server settings on the PS3 and routing authentication requests through a web server with a hacked verification file. The second method was similar, but diverted the requests to a proxy server via a PC instead.

Sony seems to have been able to render both methods ineffective. PS3 hacking forums are suggesting that people with jailbroken consoles do one of three things: buy a second PS3 and use it for going online, get rid of the hacks and update to the latest firmware, or wait it out and hope that someone comes up with another way of getting online. None of them is an ideal solution, obviously, but that's the risk you take - or one of the risks, at least - when you jailbreak your PS3.

Source: Game Politics

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As one of the few who supports Sony in this, I say: Huzza!

More and more, jailbreaking a PS3 seems like a lot of work for so little gain. As much as I miss the OtherOS feature, at this point it's simply easier to build another system than to jailbreak a PS3.

I feel for the homebrew audience, but understand the issues the Sony has with blatant piracy.

Hm, good on Sony I guess. So much for them fighting an inevitable loss. Actually doing pretty successfully (Y)

This is why I'll most likely never mod any of my devices. I prefer forgoing some benefits for the consistency of my devices working as they should.

finally things could be normal again. hacking is cheap

HUZZAH!

Seriously though, people trying to get away with using pirated game copies deserve to have their console banned online. For me this is good news.

VERY, VERY GOOD NEWS indeed! I was starting to get very worried for the PSN in general with these hacks (trophies system, and the possibility of everyone's personal info being comprimised). This is very promising indeed.

Take THAT hackers!

Hackers will find a way. They always do.

This is why I don't mod my consoles. The amount of effort that goes into it for very little in return, at least for me. I can run Linux on any of my PC's, don't need it on my PS3. I don't suck at most multi-player and actually believe in working hard to get better. Lastly, I usually have enough money to buy any game I want, so I don't need to bother with downloading hacked copies.

Good on them.

Hackers can be very persistent, but so can companies.

The circle of life.

I never really understood the reasons for modding a console. When you get banned for modding what do you do, get a new one and start over? If your goal was to save money, pretty sure that's counter productive. At least that's how I was told it was done with Xbox's.

I don't really understand why anyone would mod their console, I mean, eventually you're gonna piss off the company and they are going to go after you. I guess it would make sense if you have a ton of money you don't mind throwing away just to keep buying new consoles to mod.

Even though I think the hackers are going to find ways around it, but good on ya Sony.

This is misleading and is not news. These exploits always work for a time when a new update comes out, and then get closed off again. People used it to try to keep their Linux, people used it to go online with 3.41 when 3.42 was already out, and every time after a while they got cut off. When 3.56 came out, the exploits worked again, and now it's cut off again. This article makes it sound like the hack has always worked and now has been finally patched, for which there isn't the slightest evidence, considering the history.

Thank god. Finally.

Don't worry, it'll be rectified next week.

That is all.

Haha, it was only a matter of time. I sure am glad I never listened to friends about jailbreaking my PS3. I mean, this won't stop tries by people.

I'm not for them banning consoles. But it would seem to me that you only need to do something like a fake sign check in order to get onto the network..... So, the game shall continue I would imagine. Should be fun.

I always find enjoyment in this back and forth. I mean, think about it, while Sony has security personnel working on blocking the system, how big do you think that team is? Meanwhile, there are usually hundreds, if not thousands of folks all over the world trying to break the security. If Sony was smart it would give Waninkoko and the other fellas a high paying job, instead of suing them. You conquer by bringing people into the fold of your society, not by enslaving them and subjugating them.

In the words of Offspring, "Dance, fucker, dance", haha.

Take a page from extra credit, Sony, you do NOT mess with people who install Linux on their PS3s. You are wasting your time.

It will be hacked again in a way that Sony can't stop in short order and people will use the holes that this reveals to pirate.

archabaddon:
More and more, jailbreaking a PS3 seems like a lot of work for so little gain. As much as I miss the OtherOS feature, at this point it's simply easier to build another system than to jailbreak a PS3.

I feel for the homebrew audience, but understand the issues the Sony has with blatant piracy.

Here's the issue though, this is a can of worms that Sony opened up on their own. With the other OS feature enabled the system already did what most people wanted with the system and while there were still people who wanted to pirate, it wasn't a large enough community for the PS3 to be hacked. Note how the PS3 is about as difficult to hack as the x-box 360 and the PS3 got hacked a LONG time ago.

But what happened when they disabled the other OS option? Everybody had an incentive to hack it, and the holes in security that allowed hacks allows piracy. If they had left the other OS option on, then they'd have fewer piracy issues.

Finally a productive and effective counter-measure from Sony!

Their latest counters really sucked and screwed over the legitimate console users. This is a good and powerful strike!

Correct me if i'm wrong but can't a PS3 owner just buy a second hard drive to use at this point? I remember people having one hard drive with an old firmware and the otherOS feature, and a second that they kept up to date.

I'm with the hackers on this one. For a company like Sony to disable functionality that users have paid for looks a lot like fraud to me. I can see how having large numbers of hacked PS3's on PSN would be bad for PSN, but I say Sony has no one to blame but themselves.

Yep Sony really stuck it to them! All those free games they've put on their hard drives are now rendered useless . . .what? wait. They aren't? Well then surely it will no longer play movies right? Oh, still does that too eh? So you mean the only thing they've done is keep them offline, and not even permanently, just til the next patch? Wow, I'm completely and totally unimpressed.

Aka the same thing an owner of a modded xbox 360 console is suggested. By another and keep that one clean!

Once you mod it or cheat it you can get banned or they can do other things.

But yeah if you want to mod your PS3 go ahead.. don't expect anybody to be really be alike "aww they shouldn't" if you get caught and punished.

@Night Chrono

If replacing the HDD was allowing you to have different firmwares on the console sure sounds perfect. Of course Sony wouldn't allow for that and at least part of the firmware changes something on the motherboard. Probably some flash memory that contains the version number of the firmware it expects. Once a higher one is installed it won't accept the older firmwares anymore. Untill of course these hacks came out..but once you hack you might get hurt.

The Sony champions in this thread are silly. This is only a minor setback. The closer and closer consoles come to being PCs the more and more they are going to hacked, used for piracy, and a whole slew of other things. And no one will be able to stop them.

Xanthious:
... So you mean the only thing they've done is keep them offline, and not even permanently, just til the next patch? Wow, I'm completely and totally unimpressed.

Actually, just to clarify things a little; This IS a countermeasure to piracy too. If hacked consoles can't access the PSN, that also means they can't update the firmware. All of the latest firmware also includes Sony's rootkit tech, which can't be removed or faked because it's crosschecked online at random intervals. Now, what that means is all of the currently released games potentially CAN be pirated unless they've been patched to REQUIRE the latest firmware (which most of the popular multiplayer games will be). And FUTURE games will be coded for the most recent firmware build at time of release. (example; the recent delay before LBP2 was released).

Now, theoreticly hackers CAN release custom firmwares of the latest firmware builds, but they will have to do so WITHOUT PSN connectivity to avoid rootkit detection (so far, anyway). So if hacked firmware can't go past 3.55 (and current legit version is 3.56) that potentially means that any game requiring firmware 3.56 and above, can't be run on the system without a firmware update or game title update from the PSN. Essentially stopping hacked consoles from running any of the (online multiplayer) game titles released after a certain date. AND, those titles released prior to that date can't be played multiplayer on the PSN without risk of detection.

It's pretty clever if you ask me.

Logan Westbrook:
now it seems that those halcyon days are over

Mr. Westbrook I'm disappointed, same for most of the posters here.

Whether you approve of the hack or not, that's like saying "new DRM system is here, piracy is over"

They can put ANY firmware they want on the PS3 now, with power like that there is no way any software or verification check fix is going to stop this because they can just copy whatever the real PS3 firmware uses to pass those checks, while keeping the other OS and homebrew restrictions removed.

This is like when Nintendo releases an update that kills flash carts and then weeks later a flash cart update bypasses it. Sony is reaching the "security bypass arms race" stage of trying to stop this hack.

Which means they have lost, utterly.

ImprovizoR:
Hackers will find a way. They always do.

Exactly, Jesus, I thought Escapist users have seen enough of this shit to know how the story ends.

1.) Sony updates security
2.) Hackers update Hacked firmware
3.) Repeat steps one and two FOR FUCKING EVER

apparently people think this is the end of PS3 piracy, ignorance is bliss I suppose.

Andy Powell:

Xanthious:
... So you mean the only thing they've done is keep them offline, and not even permanently, just til the next patch? Wow, I'm completely and totally unimpressed.

Actually, just to clarify things a little; This IS a countermeasure to piracy too. If hacked consoles can't access the PSN, that also means they can't update the firmware. All of the latest firmware also includes Sony's rootkit tech, which can't be removed or faked because it's crosschecked online at random intervals. Now, what that means is all of the currently released games potentially CAN be pirated unless they've been patched to REQUIRE the latest firmware (which most of the popular multiplayer games will be). And FUTURE games will be coded for the most recent firmware build at time of release. (example; the recent delay before LBP2 was released).

Now, theoreticly hackers CAN release custom firmwares of the latest firmware builds, but they will have to do so WITHOUT PSN connectivity to avoid rootkit detection (so far, anyway). So if hacked firmware can't go past 3.55 (and current legit version is 3.56) that potentially means that any game requiring firmware 3.56 and above, can't be run on the system without a firmware update or game title update from the PSN. Essentially stopping hacked consoles from running any of the (online multiplayer) game titles released after a certain date. AND, those titles released prior to that date can't be played multiplayer on the PSN without risk of detection.

It's pretty clever if you ask me.

What about the rootkit means they can't include it in the custom firmware? Or at least fake it?

I've never really understood why Sony doesn't just start banning consoles from online. They must have a way to track it, right? Microsoft does it. Then again, the amount of stuff that I understand regarding computers and hacking is nil.

Xanthious:
Yep Sony really stuck it to them! All those free games they've put on their hard drives are now rendered useless . . .what? wait. They aren't? Well then surely it will no longer play movies right? Oh, still does that too eh? So you mean the only thing they've done is keep them offline, and not even permanently, just til the next patch? Wow, I'm completely and totally unimpressed.

You think Sony hasn't fixed this? Well I have news for you!

hey idiot! You're totally missing the point, Sony has ended piracy now and forever because of a single patch!

That seems to be the general consensus in this thread, does it make you facepalm as much as me?

Andy Powell:

Xanthious:
... So you mean the only thing they've done is keep them offline, and not even permanently, just til the next patch? Wow, I'm completely and totally unimpressed.

Actually, just to clarify things a little; This IS a countermeasure to piracy too. If hacked consoles can't access the PSN, that also means they can't update the firmware. All of the latest firmware also includes Sony's rootkit tech, which can't be removed or faked because it's crosschecked online at random intervals. Now, what that means is all of the currently released games potentially CAN be pirated unless they've been patched to REQUIRE the latest firmware (which most of the popular multiplayer games will be). And FUTURE games will be coded for the most recent firmware build at time of release. (example; the recent delay before LBP2 was released).

Now, theoreticly hackers CAN release custom firmwares of the latest firmware builds, but they will have to do so WITHOUT PSN connectivity to avoid rootkit detection (so far, anyway). So if hacked firmware can't go past 3.55 (and current legit version is 3.56) that potentially means that any game requiring firmware 3.56 and above, can't be run on the system without a firmware update or game title update from the PSN. Essentially stopping hacked consoles from running any of the (online multiplayer) game titles released after a certain date. AND, those titles released prior to that date can't be played multiplayer on the PSN without risk of detection.

It's pretty clever if you ask me.

Clever? Maybe. Ultimately effective? Doubtful. In all reality this will be worked around and rendered useless before the weekend is through and we will be reading another article titled "PS3 Hacked . . . Again". Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it after all.

Sony vs Hackers.
Status: Sony 2-upped.

Well, Sony seems to have done something. The PS3 is seemingly secure from online hacking at least, but they still havent figured out how to halt offline pirating.

Writing this I came up with my own solution for the hackings, but im keeping it to myself to prevent this, or this from happening.

Sinclose:
HUZZAH!

Seriously though, people trying to get away with using pirated game copies deserve to have their console banned online. For me this is good news.

Agreed.

Sorry homebrew folks but thoes hackers ruined it for you.

danpascooch:
What about the rootkit means they can't include it in the custom firmware? Or at least fake it?

Excellent question, and it's even more clever on Sony's part. The rootkit is not entirely included in the new firmware builds, only PART of the rootkit is. The other part of the rootkit is stored and active on the PSN right now. The PSN server-side of the rootkit communicates with the client-side of the rootkit. If it's modified, or faked, or just not giving the EXACT right answers the server-side is expecting, the console/PSN account is flagged. (possibly banned too, but that part isn't entirely clear. But recent news looks like they're banned from the PSN too)

Now, in the long term the hackers MAY be able to figure out how to fake a proper rootkit reply eventually. But in the short term, this is a really interesting and potent hacker countermeasure.

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