Sued PS3 Hacker GeoHot Responds With Rap

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Am I the only person who thinks this is guy is sad for even trying to break Sony's security on a console or am I the sad one ?

dathwampeer:

Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

Yes it is, for the same reason why posting a video on youtube about how you can enter cars without needing the keys and then start the engine without being noticed is a crime. Even assuming that the car you are using in your example actually belongs to you and you thus aren't actually steeling it for that reason, you are still showing people how they can be criminals.

If he had simply hacked the thing and then kept it to himself and used it for non-illegal stuff then it would have been fine, instead he posted instructions about it on the internet.

bahumat42:

addeB:
I'm rooting for that guy, Sony shouldn't sue people for breaking through their security. It was bound to happen eventually.

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I like to think of it more of a case of the apple vs jailbreakers argument.

Sony is trying to sell people a console, then tell them they can't do what they want with it, which is bullshit because as long as its legal, if they've sold it to you, you can crack to security. It's yours, and US courts agree.

And before anyone tells me that piracy is involved, there is no evidence he's a pirate, its purely because he pretty much jailbroke a PS3.

AzrealMaximillion:

ionveau:
The law was made to keep the middle class down and in the mud while allowing the tip top to get away with anything they wish, these laws are no different, he is being prosecuted for editing his system in any other way this would be fine change a car fine change a blender fine change a console would be fine if only there wasn't a chance they would lose millions in game sales.

The law is on the side of the rich and the fools that say this man is the bad guy are just puppets brain washed after years of propaganda

Ummm, this case has NOTHING to do with keeping the rich, rich. It has everything to do with a guy posting a threat to the security of a softwarethat he doesn't own. Get off you anti-corporation high horse and smell the coffee here. Geohot fucked up by claiming responsibility right off the bat. Making a rap video about doing the crime really doesn't help is "innocence" either as funny as it was. Seriously if you want to propagate your Illuminati fantasy then stop listening to Immortal Technique and actually read up on actual proven conspiracy theories. I hear that MK-ULTRA is a good read.

I say if he owns the software he should be able to alter it in anyway he wishes allowing companys to keep their grip on your product after its in your hands and payed for is just silly and people that support it are foolish,

Immortal Technique you say? i only know the dance with the devil song after that what?? i dont get it?

MK-ULTRA is about spy testing drugs on people.....ok

Mazty:

Asehujiko:

Mazty:
He just needs to come to terms with he is the bad guy in this instance and the law sees it that way.

Except that sony is in a big "shoot the messenger" mood and is is violating every single "fair trial" law in existence here.

"You helped promote and further the hacking of the PS3 anti-copyright system"
No, it seems pretty fair to label him the criminal here.

First off, there's way too much going on with the case to just shorten up events into one sentence. And secondly, did you miss the part about the fair trial in that quote? Maybe you didn't notice, but Sony is trying really hard to make sure GeoHot doesn't get one by suing him in California courts.

The way I see it, either both Sony and GeoHot are the bad guys, or Sony is the bad guy and GeoHot is the good guy (it really depends on your views of the Install Other OS fiasco). But I see no way in which Sony is the good guy. They removed an advertised feature and forced people to choose between that feature or online features of the console. They're trying to get a list of names of everyone who simply watched fail overflow's hacking video (just for watching a video!). And again, they're trying to sue GeoHot all the way in California to keep some kind of "home court advantage" despite the fact that GeoHot did all the things they're suing him for somewhere else. Suing people doesn't even help secure the PS3 platform, GeoHot himself had his computers and PS3s taken away because of the restraining order, and yet firmware 3.56 for the PS3 was hacked in mere HOURS without him having access to it. So the lawsuit itself is not "Sony protecting its customers" or anything noble like that.

No matter how I look at this, at the very least Sony is always wearing a pair of horns and holding a red pitchfork.

dogstile:

bahumat42:

addeB:
I'm rooting for that guy, Sony shouldn't sue people for breaking through their security. It was bound to happen eventually.

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I like to think of it more of a case of the apple vs jailbreakers argument.

Sony is trying to sell people a console, then tell them they can't do what they want with it, which is bullshit because as long as its legal, if they've sold it to you, you can crack to security. It's yours, and US courts agree.

And before anyone tells me that piracy is involved, there is no evidence he's a pirate, its purely because he pretty much jailbroke a PS3.

Yeah HE might not personally pirate. But by showing THE WHOLE WORLD how to jailbreak it he's allowed for piracy to happen. You have to be pretty damn naive to not believe people won't use it for that. And thats why its wrong, it allows for something which is massively damaging to our industry.

Hardcore_gamer:

dathwampeer:

Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

Yes it is, for the same reason why posting a video on youtube about how you can enter cars without needing the keys and then start the engine without being noticed is a crime. Even assuming that the car you are using in your example actually belongs to you and you thus aren't actually steeling it for that reason, you are still showing people how they can be criminals.

If he had simply hacked the thing and then kept it to himself and used it for non-illegal stuff then it would have been fine, instead he posted instructions about it on the internet.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/household-safety/security/lock-picking.htm

This is illegal. There are videos everywhere showing people how to do it. We must all be breaking the law.

bahumat42:

dogstile:

bahumat42:

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I like to think of it more of a case of the apple vs jailbreakers argument.

Sony is trying to sell people a console, then tell them they can't do what they want with it, which is bullshit because as long as its legal, if they've sold it to you, you can crack to security. It's yours, and US courts agree.

And before anyone tells me that piracy is involved, there is no evidence he's a pirate, its purely because he pretty much jailbroke a PS3.

Yeah HE might not personally pirate. But by showing THE WHOLE WORLD how to jailbreak it he's allowed for piracy to happen. You have to be pretty damn naive to not believe people won't use it for that. And thats why its wrong, it allows for something which is massively damaging to our industry.

Except the same thing happened with Apple, and Apple lost on the grounds that people can do whatever they want with something they own. And you would have to be naive, but americans have that thing of "innocent until proven guilty" that renders that invalid.

CaptQuakers:
Am I the only person who thinks this is guy is sad for even trying to break Sony's security on a console or am I the sad one ?

your not the only person, nor are you sad. Its completely correct to judge him because there are very few legitimate reasons to do such a thing, and their significance pales in comparison for the major illegitimate reason of piracy.

Geohot.. You are about as badass as damp bread.. On yer bike, son..

dogstile:
[quote="bahumat42" post="7.264656.10046096"]

Except the same thing happened with Apple, and Apple lost on the grounds that people can do whatever they want with something they own. And you would have to be naive, but americans have that thing of "innocent until proven guilty" that renders that invalid.

I don't care what the courts think, or what happened to apple (especially considering how many holes are in said legal system). By doing this he is creating a bad situation for our medium.

bahumat42:

dogstile:
[quote="bahumat42" post="7.264656.10046096"]

Except the same thing happened with Apple, and Apple lost on the grounds that people can do whatever they want with something they own. And you would have to be naive, but americans have that thing of "innocent until proven guilty" that renders that invalid.

I don't care what the courts think, or what happened to apple (especially considering how many holes are in said legal system). By doing this he is creating a bad situation for our medium.

Well, i'm glad you established that you were arguing morals and not legality. That could have saved me a few sentences.

I'll now leave your /opinion/ alone, because what's the point in arguing something that is defined differently for each person?

Tom Phoenix:

Anyway, funny video. If Sony wanted to respond in kind, it would probably end up being something like this:

That made me laugh. Thanks.

Mazty:

Well not wanting to sound a dick, but keep the philosophical ramblings for after meal port & cigar sessions.

Really ?
Everything except the immediate question of guilt is philosphical rambling ?
You can´t think of a single way in that this case might have any influence on anything ?
Yeah, I think we can call this one a day.
And as for not wanting to sound like a dick, I think you can assess for yourself how well that one work.
Whatever man.

dogstile:

Hardcore_gamer:

dathwampeer:

Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

Yes it is, for the same reason why posting a video on youtube about how you can enter cars without needing the keys and then start the engine without being noticed is a crime. Even assuming that the car you are using in your example actually belongs to you and you thus aren't actually steeling it for that reason, you are still showing people how they can be criminals.

If he had simply hacked the thing and then kept it to himself and used it for non-illegal stuff then it would have been fine, instead he posted instructions about it on the internet.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/household-safety/security/lock-picking.htm

This is illegal. There are videos everywhere showing people how to do it. We must all be breaking the law.

There isn't anything in that link that gives you all of the information you need to pick up locks at will. Not to mention that a lot of the tools you would need according to the instructions to aren't even legal in lots of places. I don't live in the US so I can't speak for them, but in Iceland where I live I can not buy tools that allow me to pick up locks legally, and if I were to ask around for them I would risk catching the attention of the police. As for the legal status of the actual instructions, making those would also be illegal where I live. Again I can't speak for the whole world since laws vary from one place or the other, but I would be risking catching the attention of the law by posting such instructions. I still remember the shitstorm that took place a few years ago when some people began distributing a manual on how to make homemade bombs with fairly easily obtained materials, and it resulted in the police getting involved even though nobody had actually used the instructions to blow anything up, or even make any dangerous bombs.

I've changed my opinion: please give him the death penalty.

mjc0961:
First off, there's way too much going on with the case to just shorten up events into one sentence. And secondly, did you miss the part about the fair trial in that quote? Maybe you didn't notice, but Sony is trying really hard to make sure GeoHot doesn't get one by suing him in California courts.

The way I see it, either both Sony and GeoHot are the bad guys, or Sony is the bad guy and GeoHot is the good guy (it really depends on your views of the Install Other OS fiasco). But I see no way in which Sony is the good guy. They removed an advertised feature and forced people to choose between that feature or online features of the console. They're trying to get a list of names of everyone who simply watched fail overflow's hacking video (just for watching a video!). And again, they're trying to sue GeoHot all the way in California to keep some kind of "home court advantage" despite the fact that GeoHot did all the things they're suing him for somewhere else. Suing people doesn't even help secure the PS3 platform, GeoHot himself had his computers and PS3s taken away because of the restraining order, and yet firmware 3.56 for the PS3 was hacked in mere HOURS without him having access to it. So the lawsuit itself is not "Sony protecting its customers" or anything noble like that.

No matter how I look at this, at the very least Sony is always wearing a pair of horns and holding a red pitchfork.

That is all convoluting it all.
Geohot aided massively in helping to crack the copyright protection of the PS3, therefore aiding and abetting criminal activity.
If you really care about linux, just keep a separate harddrive with it on? Or god forbid peruse the matter it legally instead of cracking software.

ionveau:

AzrealMaximillion:

ionveau:
The law was made to keep the middle class down and in the mud while allowing the tip top to get away with anything they wish, these laws are no different, he is being prosecuted for editing his system in any other way this would be fine change a car fine change a blender fine change a console would be fine if only there wasn't a chance they would lose millions in game sales.

The law is on the side of the rich and the fools that say this man is the bad guy are just puppets brain washed after years of propaganda

Ummm, this case has NOTHING to do with keeping the rich, rich. It has everything to do with a guy posting a threat to the security of a softwarethat he doesn't own. Get off you anti-corporation high horse and smell the coffee here. Geohot fucked up by claiming responsibility right off the bat. Making a rap video about doing the crime really doesn't help is "innocence" either as funny as it was. Seriously if you want to propagate your Illuminati fantasy then stop listening to Immortal Technique and actually read up on actual proven conspiracy theories. I hear that MK-ULTRA is a good read.

I say if he owns the software he should be able to alter it in anyway he wishes allowing companys to keep their grip on your product after its in your hands and payed for is just silly and people that support it are foolish,

Immortal Technique you say? i only know the dance with the devil song after that what?? i dont get it?

MK-ULTRA is about spy testing drugs on people.....ok

You obvious know little about the case and the laws involved in it then. He doesn't own the software in question. Sony owns the software. It's stated in the EULA whenever you update your firmware. It also comes in physical form with every console since it's inception. You own the hardware, Sony owns the software. Altering the software for uses that it wasn't made for, (i.e. making homebrew firmwares and allowing for pirated games to be played) is against the law. Geohot sent out the code that allowed anyone who googled it to do so. And honestly if the best thing he has to do with his time make a rap instead of preparing a court case defence, he's already lost.

The Immortal Technique comment was me comparing your little "laws keeping the rich, rich and the middle class, middle class" shpeel to what he talks about in A LOT of his songs.

The MK-ULTRA was me comparing your point to a conspiracy theory. Your original point had nothing to do with this case. This isn't a law the keeps rich people rich and poor people poor. This is a law that prevents people from altering thier gaming consoles to do acts it that aren't legal.

dogstile:

Hardcore_gamer:

dathwampeer:

Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

Yes it is, for the same reason why posting a video on youtube about how you can enter cars without needing the keys and then start the engine without being noticed is a crime. Even assuming that the car you are using in your example actually belongs to you and you thus aren't actually steeling it for that reason, you are still showing people how they can be criminals.

If he had simply hacked the thing and then kept it to himself and used it for non-illegal stuff then it would have been fine, instead he posted instructions about it on the internet.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/household-safety/security/lock-picking.htm

This is illegal. There are videos everywhere showing people how to do it. We must all be breaking the law.

The difference is Geohot has personally admitted to helping crack the code. That's aiding and abetting in a criminal act, which is against the law. Picking a door lock is a bad example because you'd assume that you own the house of the door you are picking. You don't own the software that Sony let's you use, so showing people how to access it is an offence.

dathwampeer:
I'm seriously at a loss as to how sony won that legal battle.

I'm gonna go ahead an say it.

Everyone involved got a huge stinking bribe.

He owned the system. Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

He owned the hardware, but he had no right to show people how to crack the software. He doesn't own the software, Sony does. That's how they won the legal battle. No one is bribing anyone here. Geohot fucked up. The EULA states that you do not own the software of the console, you have the right to use it within legal means. Geohot tampering with it and showing people how to do so allows for piracy on the PS3. The bad outweighs the good here and this rapping hacker broke the law.

Hardcore_gamer:

There isn't anything in that link that gives you all of the information you need to pick up locks at will.

I actually thought both the locksmith metaphor and that article were well done. Also... they dont let you own screwdrivers in Iceland? or thin pieces of curved metal? The article there explains how to do this, and with these common household tools, and a lock to practice on you could probably learn how.
As for the metaphor, i think its very appropriate, Having the knowledge to commit a crime doesn't make you a criminal, and neither does sharing it. GeoHot isnt being sued for doing anything particularly criminal, he simply showed other people how to, that's why this is a civil suit and not a criminal one.
As for Sony, they are doing everything they can to circumvent the law in a fight that someone has already fought and lost.

Hardcore_gamer:

dathwampeer:

Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

Yes it is, for the same reason why posting a video on youtube about how you can enter cars without needing the keys and then start the engine without being noticed is a crime. Even assuming that the car you are using in your example actually belongs to you and you thus aren't actually steeling it for that reason, you are still showing people how they can be criminals.

If he had simply hacked the thing and then kept it to himself and used it for non-illegal stuff then it would have been fine, instead he posted instructions about it on the internet.

I'm going to need some evidence that your analogy is legit.

If the person in the video could prove that it was his car and that no crime was actually committed. I think you'd have a hard time prosecuting them for anything.

Also it's not really a fair comparison. Geohot was showing them how to do something that isn't actually illegal. If you own the system you can do what you want to it. He never shows you how to rip and distribute a game. Only how to hack your system.

AzrealMaximillion:

dathwampeer:
I'm seriously at a loss as to how sony won that legal battle.

I'm gonna go ahead an say it.

Everyone involved got a huge stinking bribe.

He owned the system. Unless the meaning of that has somehow changed, cracking it and then showing other people how to do the same is in no way illegal.

He owned the hardware, but he had no right to show people how to crack the software. He doesn't own the software, Sony does. That's how they won the legal battle. No one is bribing anyone here. Geohot fucked up. The EULA states that you do not own the software of the console, you have the right to use it within legal means. Geohot tampering with it and showing people how to do so allows for piracy on the PS3. The bad outweighs the good here and this rapping hacker broke the law.

Surely his not owning the software only applies to him illegally copying and distributing it.

He is bringing back a function to the system that was originally a selling point but was recently taken away.

This is the exact same battle Apple lost over jailbreaking (infact, this case should be leaning even more to the hackers innocence. Because of the whole Linux issue.) It makes no sense that Sony should now win it unless there have been law changes.

This is in no way, shape or form a fair trial.

He didn't show people how to commit an illegal act. He showed them how to regain a function that was removed. If people use that for illegal purposes then that's not his fault.

Would we blame Smith & Wesson for any person who fires a magnum in a crime? Or more accurately the person who came up with that particular models design. Or should we blame the manufacturer of the bullets?

The blame rests squarely on the people actually committing the crime.

Mazty:

Asehujiko:

Mazty:
He just needs to come to terms with he is the bad guy in this instance and the law sees it that way.

Except that sony is in a big "shoot the messenger" mood and is is violating every single "fair trial" law in existence here.

"You helped promote and further the hacking of the PS3 anti-copyright system"
No, it seems pretty fair to label him the criminal here.

Aside from the ridiculousness that voicing disagreement with a corporate policy could be interpreted as a crime there's also the problem that Sony bribed a judge that admitted the entire case was out of his jurisdiction to let them steal all of his electronic devices, including the ones that hold his entire email correspondence with his attorney.

Asehujiko:

Mazty:

Asehujiko:

Except that sony is in a big "shoot the messenger" mood and is is violating every single "fair trial" law in existence here.

"You helped promote and further the hacking of the PS3 anti-copyright system"
No, it seems pretty fair to label him the criminal here.

Aside from the ridiculousness that voicing disagreement with a corporate policy could be interpreted as a crime there's also the problem that Sony bribed a judge that admitted the entire case was out of his jurisdiction to let them steal all of his electronic devices, including the ones that hold his entire email correspondence with his attorney.

So aiding and abetting criminal activities is now ridiculous?

Mazty:

TheAmazingHobo:

Mazty:

Or how about you don't convolute something which is as simple as a person designing a method to bypass a systems copyright restrictions?

Yes, that is the immediate criminal case at hand.
And I don´t even give a fuck about that specific dude.

But I do care about the broader questions, such as whether or not such acts of hacking actually should constitute a crime. Whether it should be okay to mess with something you own in a way you desire. Not to mention to problematic nature of the restraining order itself, which demands the retraction of information that has been posted on the internet.
Just because you do not wish to think about the general implications of a case, does not mean there are none.

Well not wanting to sound a dick, but keep the philosophical ramblings for after meal port & cigar sessions. Hacking is clearly a crime as it clearly is theft/breaking & entering.
Messing with something you own would be fine as long as you kept it to yourself. One guy isn't going to be able to pirate games. However making it available to everyone is simply aiding and abetting criminal activity.
This really isn't complex at all.

I agree with this guy. There are ways, successful ways to fight corporations that don't involve breaking the law. We just as gamers have to sacrifice to get it. I would love to start a world wide boycot of Activision, continuing until Mr. Kotick was fired, but the sad truth is I'm going to buy the next CoD game.

The West Baptist church (I think, the ones who protested that 9 year old's funeral) figured out how to be a bunch of bitches who get alot of attention and theres only like 12 of them in any one state. Imagine if for a week gamer's got that kind of attention.

Regardless, this guy is in the wrong. It sucks but the law he is violating has protected way more people then it has let dirtbags get away. We're not going to let him slide because he's the rag tag rebel.

bahumat42:

addeB:
I'm rooting for that guy, Sony shouldn't sue people for breaking through their security. It was bound to happen eventually.

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I still think that Sony should learn from their mistakes, when someone hacks your system you should find out how they did it and prevent it from happening in the future instead of suing people. Sure it would be great if no one felt that they needed to hack their play station but then they wouldn't need their security systems in the first place, and as long as they need they should use hackers discoveries to find holes in the system and patch them.
So instead of suing people maybe they should try to find a way to repair damages like this?

Mazty:

Asehujiko:

Mazty:

"You helped promote and further the hacking of the PS3 anti-copyright system"
No, it seems pretty fair to label him the criminal here.

Aside from the ridiculousness that voicing disagreement with a corporate policy could be interpreted as a crime there's also the problem that Sony bribed a judge that admitted the entire case was out of his jurisdiction to let them steal all of his electronic devices, including the ones that hold his entire email correspondence with his attorney.

So aiding and abetting criminal activities is now ridiculous?

All the guy did was write a slightly more eloquent version of "rolfmao, PWNED" aimed at Sony after they failed to take care of their own master password. GeoHotz is not related to fail0verflow, which did the actual hacking/sorting through Sony's trash. Aside from that, the DCMA was recently amended to allow jailbreaking in order to access advertised product features that got blocked by overzealous security(other OS in this case). It is neither GeoHotz nor fail0verflow's fault that people are going to use fail0verflow's perfectly legal code for something illegal.

That out of the way, my main point was that it's incredibly hypocritical and assholish of Sony to sue somebody for (correctly) telling them that their security sucks while they flagrantly ignore ever single court procedure/fair trial law that gets in their way.

addeB:

bahumat42:

addeB:
I'm rooting for that guy, Sony shouldn't sue people for breaking through their security. It was bound to happen eventually.

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I still think that Sony should learn from their mistakes, when someone hacks your system you should find out how they did it and prevent it from happening in the future instead of suing people. Sure it would be great if no one felt that they needed to hack their play station but then they wouldn't need their security systems in the first place, and as long as they need they should use hackers discoveries to find holes in the system and patch them.
So instead of suing people maybe they should try to find a way to repair damages like this?

The damage is already done.
Anything they do now is only stopgap. They HAD a good defence till the guy got all high and mighty and decided that everyone should be allowed to pirate. People need to learn that pissing off corporations probably isn't in their best interest. NVM the fact that allowing people to hurt the industry you support is silly enough.

Why can't all these hackers do something useful and get our money back from the banks who lost it all :)

Mazty:

So aiding and abetting criminal activities is now ridiculous?

This wouldn't be aiding and abetting, one requirement would be willful association which would be virtually impossible to prove, particularly since GeoHot is outspoken against piracy. The issue is that he violated the EULA and showed other people how to do that, however Sony technically violated the principles of the document when they advertised Linux support and then removed it.
Also, this isn't a criminal hearing ANYWAY, its a civil suit, and personally i think that Sony could very easily be staring down the barrel of a class action for removing advertised features.

bahumat42:

addeB:

bahumat42:

thats like saying shops shouldn't prosecute theives "it was bound to happen eventually".
Or murderers shouldn't be chased by the legal system "it was bound to happen eventually" seriously weak line of argument there. Just because it can and does happen doesn't mean people should lay back and take it, if some1 was threatening your personal income you'd be pissed off too.

I still think that Sony should learn from their mistakes, when someone hacks your system you should find out how they did it and prevent it from happening in the future instead of suing people. Sure it would be great if no one felt that they needed to hack their play station but then they wouldn't need their security systems in the first place, and as long as they need they should use hackers discoveries to find holes in the system and patch them.
So instead of suing people maybe they should try to find a way to repair damages like this?

The damage is already done.
Anything they do now is only stopgap. They HAD a good defence till the guy got all high and mighty and decided that everyone should be allowed to pirate. People need to learn that pissing off corporations probably isn't in their best interest. NVM the fact that allowing people to hurt the industry you support is silly enough.

Why can't all these hackers do something useful and get our money back from the banks who lost it all :)

What I mean is that they should have planned on someone eventually breaking their system and they should be ready to fix it when it happens.

Mazty:

mjc0961:
First off, there's way too much going on with the case to just shorten up events into one sentence. And secondly, did you miss the part about the fair trial in that quote? Maybe you didn't notice, but Sony is trying really hard to make sure GeoHot doesn't get one by suing him in California courts.

The way I see it, either both Sony and GeoHot are the bad guys, or Sony is the bad guy and GeoHot is the good guy (it really depends on your views of the Install Other OS fiasco). But I see no way in which Sony is the good guy. They removed an advertised feature and forced people to choose between that feature or online features of the console. They're trying to get a list of names of everyone who simply watched fail overflow's hacking video (just for watching a video!). And again, they're trying to sue GeoHot all the way in California to keep some kind of "home court advantage" despite the fact that GeoHot did all the things they're suing him for somewhere else. Suing people doesn't even help secure the PS3 platform, GeoHot himself had his computers and PS3s taken away because of the restraining order, and yet firmware 3.56 for the PS3 was hacked in mere HOURS without him having access to it. So the lawsuit itself is not "Sony protecting its customers" or anything noble like that.

No matter how I look at this, at the very least Sony is always wearing a pair of horns and holding a red pitchfork.

That is all convoluting it all.
Geohot aided massively in helping to crack the copyright protection of the PS3, therefore aiding and abetting criminal activity.
If you really care about linux, just keep a separate harddrive with it on? Or god forbid peruse the matter it legally instead of cracking software.

I will jump in your argument to say that the matter of the other OS option was pursued legally and Sony essentially told their customers to "deal with it".
That doesn't make hacking morally right, but you must take into consideration that Sony did shoot itself in the foot when it got rid of the other OS option and when the public had a legal outcry, it was largely ignored by Sony or brushed off as a "they'll get over it" moment.

However, in a legal matter, GeoHot may get off with a few fines. He was not the cause of the major Sony hacker after their update and this will be reviewed in court. How could a man with all his technology gone have hacked a PS3 he didn't have?

And about the court matters, I believe they should try GeoHot where his crimes were committed. That is usually the rule. Where you commit the crime is where you should be tried. That is what the other guy was saying.

Not saying a support this guy, but I do think that Sony should be working on either:
-Banning PS3's that have been hacked (similar to what Microsoft did)
-Making a better bit of security for the PS3s

If I see a counter rap video from sony featuring Kevin Butler and Jack Tretton I will officially love Sony and forgive them for all of their late wrongdoings.

Plus it would probably be the most amazing video ever.

Tom Goldman:
Any chance of Kevin Butler coming up with a reply?

Does anyone else in the room want to slow down with me for just a second and remember who owns roughly 33% of human recorded media that is under copyright right now, and a bulk of it is the GOOD shit? Who owns one third of the remaining means of production of not only games, but movies and what is left of commercial music?

Because the "who" in that question rhymes with "Baloney" and even though their name rhymes with a lunch-meat that's code for "bullshit", that's not what they are. They know how to find and produce exactly one thousand replies to this little mathematician with no self-applied ethics and shove this little monkey hoot right up his ass.

I'm just watching.

To me cases like this are pointless and a waste of valuable time and money for the taxpayer.

I wish Judges would take such things like this into account from the start.

1. You can't put the Genie back in the bottle. GeoHotz released the key, it's already out there, dozens of hack groups have it, the pirates DEFINITELY have it... the blow was mortal.

2. Wouldn't their money best be used trying to find a way to close the security hole instead of suing someone who will NEVER be able to pay any money for anything? Nor will he be restricted from actions because we live in AMERICA. Since the case is not criminal, you can't just restrict his American rights to continue to do whatever he wants in his own home.

3. If the purpose is to inspire fear, then you failed miserably Sony. Also, you are not untouchable... after all, it wouldn't be very difficult for people to stop buying your console and go back to the xbox 360, which for all intents and purposes is a comparable system minus blu-ray.
Killzone 3 and Uncharted aren't THAT great.

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