New Uranium Compound Could Lead to Atomic Hard Drives

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Anything that increases drive capacity, accuracy, and read / write speed; especially if it doesn't carry with it an unreasonable price abuse based of previous technology. I'm kidding myself if I even entertain the notion they won't do this for a second. However, until the more sophisticated technology becomes commercially viable I'll settle for molecule magnetics with no argument.

Well unless you call not buying overpriced release products argument.

gigastar:
Yeah, in theese times of terrorist scares just who is going to be comfortable with releasing Uranium to the general public.

And dont think like someone who knows that this cant be purified to pure Uranium, think like someone who believes Fox News.

http://www.amazon.com/Images-SI-Inc-Uranium-Ore/dp/B000796XXM

To quote one of the reviewers.
"So glad I don't have to buy this from Libyans in parking lots at the mall anymore."

yndsu:

FarleShadow:

yndsu:
Yeah, that is shady. Even when it is depleted it is still very radioactive.
So i would not want one of those in my house.
If they wanna use them in server-farms to store data be my guest.
But there is already way too much chemical stuff that is bad for your health
in any household and adding depleted uranium would not help it at all.

you need a TINFOIL HAT! My friend. Also a physics lesson.

That said, this product will never reach market, because for everyone willing to ride the edge of SCIENCE! we're gunna have millions of detractors worrying that our Depleted Uranium hardrives are going to nuke baby jesus. And FauxNews.

Maybe they'd do better if they said it was made from 'UnUranium!', no lemon scented kneejerking with UnUranium!

I'll leave the tinfoil hats to Americans.
On the physics side you are prolly right, i could have studied more.
And about the depleted uranium. Yes, most of what i know of it comes from the info i have
read on the depleted uranium rouds used by military in Iraq and other war-zones. And the
way it is used there does cause radiation, mainly because they do use other agents that burn at high temperature and thus release the uranium particles that actaully are very unhealthy.

So yeah, that is my reasoning behind it.
I do not want any uranium in my house, even if it would be available one day.
And if that makes me worthy of a tinfoil hat then so be it. I can live with it.

Depleted Uranium Ammunition, what I assume you are referring to, isn't as radioactive as people would have you believe. The uranium used in the ammunition is really used to harden it to be better at punching through hardened materials.

That being said, while it isn't insta-mutation radioactive, it is still radioactive, and particles that break off on impact and imbed themselves in people can cause long term health effects.

Needless to say, its a really frowned upon type of ammunition, which is why it is used in mounted weapons and aircraft.

The amount of uranium used in making the ammo is more than likely more than what would be used in the hard-drives. But still, you probably shouldn't put it in your mouth.

and i just declined a university application from there, DOH!, oh wellprefer manchester for chem =)

Arcanist:

vxicepickxv:
The difference between what's called depleted uranium and "regular" lead is nothing more than leftover neutrons from fission. I'm pretty sure we can reach agreement there.

Yes, but I still think it's a bit disingenuous to call it 'uranium' and not its proper nuclear annotation, Lead-207(or whatever it is).

Depleted Uranium as is typically called is basically leftover from enrichment. It really is basically all the uranium that couldn't be used for something else, and will ultimately break down. I can understand the difference, having worked with both depleted uranium(which is all but calling it junk uranium) and lead. They don't behave the same.

The weird part is that it's actually uranium, but on a scale as small as shown in the youtube video isn't really going to hurt an adult unless you spend a long time directly exposed to it. The odds of children being harmed by it are slightly greater, but with a total mass that small, you're not really going to do much to children without constant exposure.

Putting health concerns aside, does the average user even need that much space? The amount of space offered by modern hard drives is already way more than most people actually require. As such, I fail to see much of a benefit from even larger hard drives, at least not at this point in time.

gigastar:
Yeah, in theese times of terrorist scares just who is going to be comfortable with releasing Uranium to the general public.

And dont think like someone who knows that this cant be purified to pure Uranium, think like someone who believes Fox News.

2 Atoms? You'd need a lot of harddrives to cause any threat. There's more nuclear material in your smoke alarm.

yndsu:

I'll leave the tinfoil hats to Americans.
On the physics side you are prolly right, i could have studied more.
And about the depleted uranium. Yes, most of what i know of it comes from the info i have
read on the depleted uranium rouds used by military in Iraq and other war-zones. And the
way it is used there does cause radiation, mainly because they do use other agents that burn at high temperature and thus release the uranium particles that actaully are very unhealthy.

So yeah, that is my reasoning behind it.
I do not want any uranium in my house, even if it would be available one day.
And if that makes me worthy of a tinfoil hat then so be it. I can live with it.

Sorry to ruin your day, but DU (Depleted Uranium, no I'm not typing that out everytime I say it) is only weakly radioactive, its radioactivity in DU munitions isn't useful, its its Pyrophoricity (Burns on contact with air) and, on impact, forms a sharp projectile that can penetrate deeper armor layers.

DU munitions drawbacks are that it is both pyrophoric and a toxic metal, its easily absorbed in dust form and effects many of the body's systems. Aside from that, its a very dense, easily obtained metal, which before the research into its biological effects, made it a good metal for use in penetrator weapons.

yndsu:
Yeah, that is shady. Even when it is depleted it is still very radioactive.
So i would not want one of those in my house.
If they wanna use them in server-farms to store data be my guest.
But there is already way too much chemical stuff that is bad for your health
in any household and adding depleted uranium would not help it at all.

A foolish assumption. Depleted uranium is very stable, and the dangers of it's pathetic levels of radiation are eclipsed by it's status as a heavy metal like lead. Your more likely to develop heavy metal poisoning than radiation induced tumors, and since these hard drives would use it in such small concentrations that are confined within the device itself, contact would be rare and harmless.

Kalezian:

yndsu:

FarleShadow:

you need a TINFOIL HAT! My friend. Also a physics lesson.

That said, this product will never reach market, because for everyone willing to ride the edge of SCIENCE! we're gunna have millions of detractors worrying that our Depleted Uranium hardrives are going to nuke baby jesus. And FauxNews.

Maybe they'd do better if they said it was made from 'UnUranium!', no lemon scented kneejerking with UnUranium!

I'll leave the tinfoil hats to Americans.
On the physics side you are prolly right, i could have studied more.
And about the depleted uranium. Yes, most of what i know of it comes from the info i have
read on the depleted uranium rouds used by military in Iraq and other war-zones. And the
way it is used there does cause radiation, mainly because they do use other agents that burn at high temperature and thus release the uranium particles that actaully are very unhealthy.

So yeah, that is my reasoning behind it.
I do not want any uranium in my house, even if it would be available one day.
And if that makes me worthy of a tinfoil hat then so be it. I can live with it.

Depleted Uranium Ammunition, what I assume you are referring to, isn't as radioactive as people would have you believe. The uranium used in the ammunition is really used to harden it to be better at punching through hardened materials.

That being said, while it isn't insta-mutation radioactive, it is still radioactive, and particles that break off on impact and imbed themselves in people can cause long term health effects.

Needless to say, its a really frowned upon type of ammunition, which is why it is used in mounted weapons and aircraft.

The amount of uranium used in making the ammo is more than likely more than what would be used in the hard-drives. But still, you probably shouldn't put it in your mouth.

Yeah, that is what i was talking about. And belive me, i would not put that in my mouth anyway. If any metal thingy would go in my mouth it would be a battery on the tip of the tounge to get that little buzz =P

vxicepickxv:

Depleted Uranium as is typically called is basically leftover from enrichment. It really is basically all the uranium that couldn't be used for something else, and will ultimately break down.

Meaning that it isn't 'non-radioactive', as claimed by the article.

I can understand the difference, having worked with both depleted uranium(which is all but calling it junk uranium) and lead. They don't behave the same.

And I never said they where the same thing, just that once this depleted uranium decomposes it's no longer uranium.

The_root_of_all_evil:
Brings a whole new meaning to rage-quitting.
image

Hmm, wonder how many funny things I can think of about this subject and that picture...

1: Thats one hell of an overclocking job you did there...
2: Opps, computer crashed.
3: guess you should add another cooling fan to the case...

Damn... Only three and one of them really sucks...

FarleShadow:

Sorry to ruin your day, but DU (Depleted Uranium, no I'm not typing that out everytime I say it) is only weakly radioactive, its radioactivity in DU munitions isn't useful, its its Pyrophoricity (Burns on contact with air) and, on impact, forms a sharp projectile that can penetrate deeper armor layers.

DU munitions drawbacks are that it is both pyrophoric and a toxic metal, its easily absorbed in dust form and effects many of the body's systems. Aside from that, its a very dense, easily obtained metal, which before the research into its biological effects, made it a good metal for use in penetrator weapons.

Like i said, fair enough. It is use indeed mostly for it's weight as it is denser and heavier than led. And US Military has loads of it left over since the Cold War. So it is easy to access and use for them.

So how big we talking? 10 terabytes? a petabyte? 1 million yottabytes?

Could you imagine a 1 yottabyte hard drive?

Tigurus:
Would be fun if it was an actual Atomic hard drive and that suddenly the hard drive break and a new chernobyl will be created.
...
No actually that would be really bad :O

Still, I don't mind a thousandfold increasement of storage space.
Though I already have enough of 1 terabyte. I don't have that full yet :O

I think you mean a new Fukushima.

............. too soon?

Whats the point really?

I mean for server's and storage companies I guess it makes sense, but for average user is it really all that necessary? I built myself an 8 TB External Raid, and I barely use any the space on the thing, and and I am a massive media junkie, I've backed up my entire collection of movies and box sets, along with a lot of my PS2 and older games, along with a bunch of PC games. I know people that barely use half of their 750 gig hard drives.

If you somehow needed even more space than that you could still go one step higher and setup your own File Hosting server.

Though I suppose for the less technically apt or lazy I guess I could see the point.

Jabberwock King:

yndsu:
Yeah, that is shady. Even when it is depleted it is still very radioactive.
So i would not want one of those in my house.
If they wanna use them in server-farms to store data be my guest.
But there is already way too much chemical stuff that is bad for your health
in any household and adding depleted uranium would not help it at all.

A foolish assumption. Depleted uranium is very stable, and the dangers of it's pathetic levels of radiation are eclipsed by it's status as a heavy metal like lead. Your more likely to develop heavy metal poisoning than radiation induced tumors, and since these hard drives would use it in such small concentrations that are confined within the device itself, contact would be rare and harmless.

Indeed that contact would be rare and to most part harmless, but like i said, i personally still would rather not have any of it in my house.

Also, like it was stated in the video poste earlier, this HDD would only work 2 degrees below absolute and to get that is not possible and those HDD's would not work (by what i understud from the video). So yeah, so much about that.

spectrenihlus:
So how big we talking? 10 terabytes? a petabyte? 1 million yottabytes?

Could you imagine a 1 yottabyte hard drive?

My god... THE SCIENCE!

The firmware you would need for that to even work...

silverdragon9:
its not weapons grade uranium so its impossible to detonate but the radition would be an issue. (most people don't realize that lead shielding only stops some forms of radiation.)

Yeah, that pesky cosmic radiation goes right through my lead brick wall. Works fine for gamma rays though...

Sooo...the paramagnetism of supercold compounds is nothing new, but the fact that it was made with uranium is quite cool (see what I did there?) Anyway, this still an active area of research for inorganic chemists. That said, the cold necessary for this to work is more of a hazard than the radioactivity associated with uranium, which isn't much of a problem to begin with. I'm quite curious when the first compounds exhibiting this behavior at liquid nitrogen temperature or higher are developed. Now that would be a neat tittle thing for large server assemblies: storage + cooling at the same time!

Well Depleted Uranium has a half-life of 4.468 billion years. That may sound like a long time but in a disk of 1,000,000,000,000 atoms (Not very much, its probably much more than this) then you can expect at least a few to decay every day. Of course, you need hard drives to not corrupt data quickly, but on this hard drives you would end up with everything slowly messing up.

silv:
Steve Liddle himself and Martyn Poliakoff dismiss it due to the fact that it only works between 0 and 2 degrees kelvin.

lol I keep forgetting what scientists consider "very low temperatures". So this effect occurs somewhere in the region of absolute zero? :P

thisbymaster:
So my case would need 10 feet of lead around it? No thanks, also I don't like the idea of my hard drive having a half life other then the one from valve.

Well unless you're planning to live for roughly 4.5 billion years, you won't have to worry about living through even one half-life.

Blaster395:
Well Depleted Uranium has a half-life of 4.468 billion years. That may sound like a long time but in a disk of 1,000,000,000,000 atoms (Not very much, its probably much more than this) then you can expect at least a few to decay every day. Of course, you need hard drives to not corrupt data quickly, but on this hard drives you would end up with everything slowly messing up.

Your comment has made my science muscle shrink to the size of a hamster's testicle, then disappear under my house.

Because if we're comparing the chance that the 'few' decaying atoms of an element in your harddrive that could, potentially, decay within 4.468 billion years and that those particular singular radiation bursts could potentially hit DNA that represents a small portion of your body at anyone time and that those affected DNA happen to represent themselves as cancer cells...

I'm sorry, my predictive capacity is limited to events happening in reality, if you would like to contact my quantum-computing co-processor, please *tone* press 1, 2 and 3 before the tone.

Ozzythecat:

spectrenihlus:
So how big we talking? 10 terabytes? a petabyte? 1 million yottabytes?

Could you imagine a 1 yottabyte hard drive?

My god... THE SCIENCE!

The firmware you would need for that to even work...

You would never need a new HDD ever again. Nor will your children's chidlren's children.

believer258:

The_root_of_all_evil:
Brings a whole new meaning to rage-quitting.
image

Sir, you win this thread and deserve a cookie:

image

On topic, do we really need that much hard drive space? I mean, a 250 gigger should be good for the average user, 500 seems pretty good for anyone that games or listens to a lot of music, downloads a lot of videos, etc. And if you need more, we have multiple terabytes now. I could see NASA or big businesses using this, but I really don't think the general public has any need of such massive amounts of space.

Now, if only they could get the internet to run at about 1GB per second, I would be happy. Hell, I'd be happy with a quarter of that.

no not now but think about the future I mean crysis 6 will probably be a terrabyte

FarleShadow:

Blaster395:
Well Depleted Uranium has a half-life of 4.468 billion years. That may sound like a long time but in a disk of 1,000,000,000,000 atoms (Not very much, its probably much more than this) then you can expect at least a few to decay every day. Of course, you need hard drives to not corrupt data quickly, but on this hard drives you would end up with everything slowly messing up.

Your comment has made my science muscle shrink to the size of a hamster's testicle, then disappear under my house.

Because if we're comparing the chance that the 'few' decaying atoms of an element in your harddrive that could, potentially, decay within 4.468 billion years and that those particular singular radiation bursts could potentially hit DNA that represents a small portion of your body at anyone time and that those affected DNA happen to represent themselves as cancer cells...

I'm sorry, my predictive capacity is limited to events happening in reality, if you would like to contact my quantum-computing co-processor, please *tone* press 1, 2 and 3 before the tone.

I am not on about the radiation being dangerous, I am on about the Uranium decaying into something else messing up the hard drive.

Next time read more than the first line of my post.

I have had my computer for 2-4 years, don't really know nor care but I still have 129 GB left, I don't really need thousands upon thousands of storage space so I don't really care about this discovery unless it means lag free interwebz services.

A lag free CoD or GoW?! I would be invincible!!!

...fuck...YES.
>.>
*awkwardly walks out of room while holding a large book against waist*

Well Steve Liddle of the University of Nottingham, you best lock up your research well, because you can be sure Robin Hood will try to steal it to prevent the Sheriff from using it for evil purposes... Like killing King Richard with it somehow...

Blaster395:

FarleShadow:

Blaster395:
Well Depleted Uranium has a half-life of 4.468 billion years. That may sound like a long time but in a disk of 1,000,000,000,000 atoms (Not very much, its probably much more than this) then you can expect at least a few to decay every day. Of course, you need hard drives to not corrupt data quickly, but on this hard drives you would end up with everything slowly messing up.

Your comment has made my science muscle shrink to the size of a hamster's testicle, then disappear under my house.

Because if we're comparing the chance that the 'few' decaying atoms of an element in your harddrive that could, potentially, decay within 4.468 billion years and that those particular singular radiation bursts could potentially hit DNA that represents a small portion of your body at anyone time and that those affected DNA happen to represent themselves as cancer cells...

I'm sorry, my predictive capacity is limited to events happening in reality, if you would like to contact my quantum-computing co-processor, please *tone* press 1, 2 and 3 before the tone.

I am not on about the radiation being dangerous, I am on about the Uranium decaying into something else messing up the hard drive.

Next time read more than the first line of my post.

So replace the parts where I said 'DNA' with 'The chance of Radiation removing data' and 'Cancer' with 'The chance that removing acouple '1' or '0' has in corrupting a program.

The probabilities are roughly the same.

Do people not realize this would hardly be dangerous. Uranium is in thousands of products people use everyday and seawater is full of it. Many other radioactive things are in your home as well. Smoke detectors use Americium-241 which is highly radioactive and gives off gamma radiation (which is the most dangerous). As long as your not eating it you are fairly safe.

yndsu:

Kalezian:

yndsu:

I'll leave the tinfoil hats to Americans.
On the physics side you are prolly right, i could have studied more.
And about the depleted uranium. Yes, most of what i know of it comes from the info i have
read on the depleted uranium rouds used by military in Iraq and other war-zones. And the
way it is used there does cause radiation, mainly because they do use other agents that burn at high temperature and thus release the uranium particles that actaully are very unhealthy.

So yeah, that is my reasoning behind it.
I do not want any uranium in my house, even if it would be available one day.
And if that makes me worthy of a tinfoil hat then so be it. I can live with it.

Depleted Uranium Ammunition, what I assume you are referring to, isn't as radioactive as people would have you believe. The uranium used in the ammunition is really used to harden it to be better at punching through hardened materials.

That being said, while it isn't insta-mutation radioactive, it is still radioactive, and particles that break off on impact and imbed themselves in people can cause long term health effects.

Needless to say, its a really frowned upon type of ammunition, which is why it is used in mounted weapons and aircraft.

The amount of uranium used in making the ammo is more than likely more than what would be used in the hard-drives. But still, you probably shouldn't put it in your mouth.

Yeah, that is what i was talking about. And belive me, i would not put that in my mouth anyway. If any metal thingy would go in my mouth it would be a battery on the tip of the tounge to get that little buzz =P

Just sayin', I know a couple of people that have put stupid things in their mouths, the least of which was a lead buck-shot pellet, which in the state of California causes cancer.

So we have a computer that can run Crysis 3. Whoop-de-do.....

Well it would not be dangerous as the amounts that would be acquired even in the Factory would be less than critical mass. And also I doubt anyone is going to fire neutrons into the nucleuses successfully. And even if successful the they would only get a beta decay and not anymore then that.

Still tell this to Green Peace...

spectrenihlus:

Could you imagine a 1 yottabyte hard drive?

The rate computers are advancing, it's downright inevitable.

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