K Computer Makes Your Gaming Rig Look Lazy

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K Computer Makes Your Gaming Rig Look Lazy

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Japan tops the latest list of the world's supercomputers by nearly tripling the processor capacity of the previous computer king.

As a country, Japan is known primarily for three things: animated characters with eyes that would make a baby deer jealous, inventive culinary applications for raw fish, and an overriding obsession with the latest and greatest technology. It should come as little surprise then, that the Land of the Rising Sun has nabbed the top spot on the most recent list of the world's top 500 supercomputers.

Created as a joint project by researchers working for Fujitsu and the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, the modestly-named "K computer" is capable of "8.162 petaflops." In layman's terms, that would be 8.162 quadrillion floating point operations per second.

By contrast, the previous world's fastest supercomputer, China's "Tianhe-1A," clocks a paltry 2.6 petaflops.

The United States managed to snag the third place spot thanks to the Department of Energy's "Jaguar" supercomputer. It only manages 1.75 petaflops, but easily wins the award for "supercomputer with most wicked rad name."

So how do you build an 8-plus petaflop monster like the K? First, you need 68,544 CPUs, and custom built interlinking software that allows the machine to achieve an "extraordinarily high computing efficiency ratio of 93." Assuming you can manage that, the millions of dollars in cooling equipment and storage space necessary to house the massive machine should be pretty easy to acquire.

The really impressive bit is that the K is not yet complete, at least according to the official press release from RIKEN. "When configuration of the K computer is complete in 2012, it is designed to achieve LINPACK performance of 10 petaflops. It will be widely used in a variety of computational science fields where it is expected to contribute to the generation of world-class research results," it claims.

That's very diplomatic, but I think we can all see where Japan is going with this whole "K computer" project. I mean, who did you expect would pilot that life-sized Gundam they built? Whiny teenagers?

Source: RIKEN, via Boing Boing

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Damn. How much energy do you think this think would burn through in a day? I'd hate to be paying those bills.

Awesome, makes my little black scientist heart beat a bit merrier :)

Earnest Cavalli:
As a country, Japan is known primarily for three things: animated characters with eyes that would make a baby deer jealous, inventive culinary applications for raw fish, and an overriding obsession with the latest and greatest technology.

And tentacles, you forgot the tentacles.

OT: I read about this in the newspapers, apperantly it cost several billion euros to build. And it will likely only be the Nr 1 supercomputer for a few years. Still awesome though.

Catchy Slogan:
Damn. How much energy do you think this think would burn through in a day? I'd hate to be paying those bills.

Think of the cooling. If it were to stop for an hour, every human in the room would be dead.

£10 says it still can't run Crysis on ultra settings and chugs when things get busy!

I'm not saying it ain't a darn impressive machine. But Crysis is trial by fire for a computer.

That sounds much more powerful than OK Computer.

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Weird captchas are back! Yay!

MercurySteam:

Think of the cooling. If it were to stop for an hour, every human in the room would be dead.

The cooling is design to stop the processors from overheating and failing, it doesn't make it like an air conditioned room. people don't die from being in a room of broken pieces of computers.

But will it blend?

Well, I have yet another reason to feel bad about my computer. The question is...can it run Crysis?

what practical use does it have?

Does some billionaire REEAAAALLLYYY hate waiting for the page to load?

What?!?

Hehe...petaflops...get it? Peta flops..they do that alot :3

OT: Sweet...how soon can they install it under my house so I can start gaming on it?

Ofc provided they provide power...

noolli:

MercurySteam:

Think of the cooling. If it were to stop for an hour, every human in the room would be dead.

The cooling is design to stop the processors from overheating and failing, it doesn't make it like an air conditioned room. people don't die from being in a room of broken pieces of computers.

Trust me, I've seen what happens to a CPU when you remove the cooler. But I've heard that when rooms full of super-processors lose power, the secondary cooling system will attempt to draw heat away from the hardware and pump it into the room until the ventilation kicks in again. I don't know much about supercomputers, but the heat that would transfer into the room would be quite deadly.

"In layman's terms, that would be 8.162 quadrillion floating point operations per second."

uhm...anyone care to put that in actual Laymans terms? I mean, if you don't expect the layman to know what a petaflop is do you really expect them to know what a floating point operation is?

Prince Regent:

Earnest Cavalli:
As a country, Japan is known primarily for three things: animated characters with eyes that would make a baby deer jealous, inventive culinary applications for raw fish, and an overriding obsession with the latest and greatest technology.

And tentacles, you forgot the tentacles.

Damn... ninja'd.

TimeLord:
£10 says it still can't run Crysis on ultra settings and chugs when things get busy!

I'm not saying it ain't a darn impressive machine. But Crysis is trial by fire for a computer.

AND AGAIN!

well, shit. I got nothin funny to say now.

noolli:

MercurySteam:

Think of the cooling. If it were to stop for an hour, every human in the room would be dead.

The cooling is design to stop the processors from overheating and failing, it doesn't make it like an air conditioned room. people don't die from being in a room of broken pieces of computers.

When the cooling for the servers breakdown,watch-out for the IT support wearing Hawaiian T-shirts :D.

Most small and unsophisticated server rooms will result to primitive methods I.E leaving the door open and placing giant fans to prevent the servers and people from overheating.

Better than his last article where the author loudly proclaimed that an all but obsolete test bench was the "rise of the machine overlords"

OP, a machine overlord is MUCH more likely to resemble a supercomputer, you know, like THIS one, than a jumble of spare parts.

MercurySteam:

noolli:

MercurySteam:

Think of the cooling. If it were to stop for an hour, every human in the room would be dead.

The cooling is design to stop the processors from overheating and failing, it doesn't make it like an air conditioned room. people don't die from being in a room of broken pieces of computers.

Trust me, I've seen what happens to a CPU when you remove the cooler. But I've heard that when rooms full of super-processors lose power, the secondary cooling system will attempt to draw heat away from the hardware and pump it into the room until the ventilation kicks in again. I don't know much about supercomputers, but the heat that would transfer into the room would be quite deadly.

True I am sure it would get hot, depends on how hot really especially as most modern CPUs will shut down when then approach breaking levels. Regular CPUs like the ones we are likely to be using now will start degrading at around 100c and will not be lethal (unless its on your face). I guess 68,000 would be more lethal if they were to all overheat to like 100c. More likely they would be at around 10c and so like 40-50c would be the breaking limit which isn't lethal just uncomfortable. But if they work on regular temps then yer people would start to die.

immovablemover:
"In layman's terms, that would be 8.162 quadrillion floating point operations per second."

uhm...anyone care to put that in actual Laymans terms?

a normal calculator is about 10 FLOPS
this thing is about 8.162*10^15 or
8162000000000000 FLOPS

WanderingFool:

Prince Regent:

Earnest Cavalli:
As a country, Japan is known primarily for three things: animated characters with eyes that would make a baby deer jealous, inventive culinary applications for raw fish, and an overriding obsession with the latest and greatest technology.

And tentacles, you forgot the tentacles.

Damn... ninja'd.

TimeLord:
£10 says it still can't run Crysis on ultra settings and chugs when things get busy!

I'm not saying it ain't a darn impressive machine. But Crysis is trial by fire for a computer.

AND AGAIN!

well, shit. I got nothin funny to say now.

How about... flublegurblewobblydoo?
You know, but in context.

the spud:
what practical use does it have?

Does some billionaire REEAAAALLLYYY hate waiting for the page to load?

What?!?

It'll probably be used to do protein folding calculations and/or other such complicated scientific projects. We're still working on that whole human proteome thingy.

However, it's main function is to elongate Japan's 1337 tech dick. That's what most of these technological government projects are designed to do. That's why the United States went to the moon and have subsequently lost our technology to do so once Russia's dick became nonthreatening.

mad825:

When the cooling for the servers breakdown,watch-out for the IT support wearing Hawaiian T-shirts :D.

Most small and unsophisticated server rooms will result to primitive methods I.E leaving the door open and placing giant fans to prevent the servers from overheating.

Yer I.T support guys are always fun to not be around when they are working.

This isn't a small unsophisticated server room though I am sure the cooling wont lead to some massive meltdown, Japanese are ahead of the curve when it come to stuff like that.

noolli:

MercurySteam:

noolli:

The cooling is design to stop the processors from overheating and failing, it doesn't make it like an air conditioned room. people don't die from being in a room of broken pieces of computers.

Trust me, I've seen what happens to a CPU when you remove the cooler. But I've heard that when rooms full of super-processors lose power, the secondary cooling system will attempt to draw heat away from the hardware and pump it into the room until the ventilation kicks in again. I don't know much about supercomputers, but the heat that would transfer into the room would be quite deadly.

True I am sure it would get hot, depends on how hot really especially as most modern CPUs will shut down when then approach breaking levels. Regular CPUs like the ones we are likely to be using now will start degrading at around 100c and will not be lethal (unless its on your face). I guess 68,000 would be more lethal if they were to all overheat to like 100c. More likely they would be at around 10c and so like 40-50c would be the breaking limit which isn't lethal just uncomfortable. But if they work on regular temps then yer people would start to die.

With a room of expensive hardware like that, I'm sure the priority would go to the preservation of the computer systems. Either way I would not like to be locked in that room for an hour with no ventilation.

Cool, But is it calculating anything useful?

MercurySteam:

With a room of expensive hardware like that, I'm sure the priority would go to the preservation of the computer systems. Either way I would not like to be locked in that room for an hour with no ventilation.

Yer true dat, I would not like to be locked in a room especially one like that as those cooling systems sound like jet engines.

noolli:

MercurySteam:

With a room of expensive hardware like that, I'm sure the priority would go to the preservation of the computer systems. Either way I would not like to be locked in that room for an hour with no ventilation.

Yer true dat, I would not like to be locked in a room especially one like that as those cooling systems sound like jet engines.

Haven't they heard of water cooling or Noctua?

immovablemover:
"In layman's terms, that would be 8.162 quadrillion floating point operations per second."

uhm...anyone care to put that in actual Laymans terms? I mean, if you don't expect the layman to know what a petaflop is do you really expect them to know what a floating point operation is?

Just thing that it' simultaneously solving quadrillions of problems like 1.3 * 5.3892748923 ... I think

Ed.:

immovablemover:
"In layman's terms, that would be 8.162 quadrillion floating point operations per second."

uhm...anyone care to put that in actual Laymans terms?

a normal calculator is about 10 FLOPS
this thing is about 8.162*10^15 or
8162000000000000 FLOPS

completely missed the point of his question...

MercurySteam:

noolli:

MercurySteam:

With a room of expensive hardware like that, I'm sure the priority would go to the preservation of the computer systems. Either way I would not like to be locked in that room for an hour with no ventilation.

Yer true dat, I would not like to be locked in a room especially one like that as those cooling systems sound like jet engines.

Haven't they heard of water cooling or Noctua?

Probably. Just saying. They probably have. Considering they're watercooling a FREAKING NUCLEAR PLANT atm.

but still, they should consider Thermalright.

What do they use such supercomputers for anyway? Mining Bitcoins? The SETI project? Protein Folding problems? Or simply calculating pi? :-P

Anyone else think it kind of looks like that part in Assassin's Creed 2 when Lucy and Desmond are escaping Abstergo and they run through that huge room with all the animuses?

Annoying Turd:
What do they use such supercomputers for anyway? Mining Bitcoins? The SETI project? Protein Folding problems? Or simply calculating pi? :-P

check out TOP500 to see applications that Supercomputers are running and their hardware. Some are classified.

http://www.top500.org/

the spud:
what practical use does it have?

Does some billionaire REEAAAALLLYYY hate waiting for the page to load?

What?!?

Scientific research isn't something you can do with your average desktop PC. This thing is designed for astronomical numbers and calculations that still take years to do with the most powerful computer on the planet.

Also @article: my gaming rig is optimized for games. I wouldn't wanna try and play a game on this thing.

Want to get me some of this! I'm stuck using some american one for my research, takes like 2 months per simulation...

Catchy Slogan:
Damn. How much energy do you think this think would burn through in a day? I'd hate to be paying those bills.

It's almost as if they would need more... nuclear plants.

*badumtish*

"Petaflops" has got to be the silliest name for a unit of measure ever.

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