Stephen King's Scaring Up A Sequel To The Shining

Stephen King's Scaring Up A Sequel To The Shining

Classic horror novel The Shining is getting a sequel, starring a group of elderly vampires driving RVs.

Novelist Stephen King has been teasing fans of The Shining with the possibility of a sequel since 2009. Speaking at a book reading for Under The Dome, King remarked that he wanted to write a sequel called Dr. Sleep, that would tell the story of a grown-up Danny Torrance (the heroic little boy from the original story) and where his psychic powers had taken him in life. The initial rumors of Dr. Sleep were quickly crushed, but it turns out that this was more than wishful thinking: Stephen King is officially working on a new Shining novel, and it's still called Dr. Sleep.

The video seen here is from King's appearance at George Mason University, where he read an excerpt from the book. At the same time, the author's website acknowledged that the sequel is indeed happening, although the actual information is pretty sparse:

It's now official--Stephen is working on Dr. Sleep, the sequel to The Shining. This weekend Steve read an excerpt from this at his appearance at George Mason University. They have given us permission to post their taping of the event here on Steve's site which we will do as soon as we receive the file. Dr. Sleep's plot includes a traveling group of vampires called The Tribe which is part of the passage he read from.

So far, this pretty great, though I was saddened that no updates on Danny were provided by King at this point. That said, the description of The Tribe in this video is certainly entertaining, and the excerpt King reads does a nice job of mixing eeriness and black humor. Admit it: It's pretty hard not to grin when you think of geriatric vampires terrorizing highways while wearing stretch pants and "floppy golf hats."

Source: Bloody Disgusting

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I could never really get into Stephen King's books, no matter how hard I tried.

It's been hit-or-miss for me. I like a fair amount of his older stuff, but everything from Rose Madder on is kinda... eh.

vansau:
Stephen King's Scaring Up A Sequel To [em]The Shining

Ummmmmmmmmmm...
Aren't that you - Americans - who forged saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" ?

Hmm.... what the hell, I'll read it.

I like Stephen King, and I'll trust that absurd as this idea for the book is, it will be great. Or at the very least entertaining.

JesterRaiin:

vansau:
Stephen King's Scaring Up A Sequel To The Shining

Ummmmmmmmmmm...
Aren't that you - Americans - who forged saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" ?

It's possible we coined it, wouldn't doubt it considering how much "fixing" is constantly done to schools and roads that just ends up making things worse. I've a feeling if one dug deep enough they'd find it originates elsewhere though.

OT: Did the shining need a sequel? I don't know since I never read the book, but if the movie was any indication the case was closed. Hotel stays super haunted, another restless soul is added to it's growing legion of the damned, and we all walk away with the valuable lesson of not to build mountain resorts on an Indian burial ground. It goes well with the "move the whole damned graveyard you cheap bastard" moral from Poltergeist.

KeyMaster45:

JesterRaiin:

vansau:
Stephen King's Scaring Up A Sequel To The Shining

Ummmmmmmmmmm...
Aren't that you - Americans - who forged saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" ?

It's possible we coined it, wouldn't doubt it considering how much "fixing" is constantly done to schools and roads that just ends up making things worse. I've a feeling if one dug deep enough they'd find it originates elsewhere though.

you shall wonder no-more!

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/if-it-aint-broke-dont-fix-it.html

apparently it was the Americans, and specifically to do with their administration

vansau:
It's been hit-or-miss for me. I like a fair amount of his older stuff, but everything from Rose Madder on is kinda... eh.

King does a lot of good stuff, but some of his stuff is a bit hit and miss. Cell was dull, and I found The Dark Tower unreadable.

On Writing is a must-read, but since Rose Madder his best stuff has been in short stories (imho).

L.T's Theory of Pets is deeply chilling. And 1408 terrifies me.

I haven't read many King novels, but the ones I have read, I do enjoy. I really enjoyed The Shining.

I suppose it also helps that I live in the same state as King, so his atmosphere and writing style really 'hit home', so to speak. It's really easy for me to get immersed in his writing. One of the main reasons I haven't read much King, is because I've seen virtually every one of his film adaptations, and I generally don't like reading a book after seeing the movie.

Actually looking to pick up "11/22/63" this November, though.

The Shining was by Stephen King?

Wow. Did not knew that, despite loving the movie. I am a shame to nerddom.

I'm not sure that it is possible to take any of his novels seriously anymore. I mean, I haven't enjoyed anything he has written in two decades. The Shining wrapped itself up quite nicely, so... no point for a sequel at all, outside of a blatant cash-in. I mean, I know that King has been out of idea for a long time, but I didn't know he was that dry that he just has to start randomly making sequels to his best works.

The problem I had with some of Kings books was his obsession over the Dark Tower series.

People from those books appeared in a lot of his others especially Roland.

Randall Flagg, best known for his appearance in The Stand, has appeared in 9 of Kings other books Dark Tower included (alias Walter o'Dim until his true identity as Flagg is revealed).

He's also writing another Dark Tower book......

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dark_Tower:_The_Wind_Through_the_Keyhole

But the Dark Tower series didn't end .... at all. It had no ending, no closure and it didn't follow through to anything. The ending it did have was so full of holes I could use it to drain pasta.

And that new book isn't a follow up .. oh no .. it's set between book 4 and book 5 for no reason whatsoever.

And does The Shining really need a sequel?

GreatTeacherCAW:
I'm not sure that it is possible to take any of his novels seriously anymore. I mean, I haven't enjoyed anything he has written in two decades. The Shining wrapped itself up quite nicely, so... no point for a sequel at all, outside of a blatant cash-in. I mean, I know that King has been out of idea for a long time, but I didn't know he was that dry that he just has to start randomly making sequels to his best works.

Nah. Stephen King doesn't do cash-ins, he doesn't really need to, he is a pretty wealthy guy, besides his most popular book among his fans is The Stand, so if anything he would cash in on that. If Danny is a character that he feels like he should revisit, then I'll trust that he has his reasons and I'll buy his book as always.

vansau:
It's been hit-or-miss for me. I like a fair amount of his older stuff, but everything from Rose Madder on is kinda... eh.

I personally found both The Green Mile and Bag of Bones amazing, but hey, opinions.

vansau:
It's been hit-or-miss for me. I like a fair amount of his older stuff, but everything from Rose Madder on is kinda... eh.

Likewise, though I found IT to have its merits, as did Dreamcatcher and Different Seasons. Duma Key and Under the Dome...no thanks.

OT; I heard about this ages ago. I just hope he doesn't suffer sequelitis though.

"elderly vampires driving RVs"

does it have anything to do with that whole thing he said about the Twilight books?

teh_Canape:
"elderly vampires driving RVs"

does it have anything to do with that whole thing he said about the Twilight books?

You know, I think it just might. ;)

KeyMaster45:
OT: Did the shining need a sequel? I don't know since I never read the book, but if the movie was any indication the case was closed. Hotel stays super haunted, another restless soul is added to it's growing legion of the damned, and we all walk away with the valuable lesson of not to build mountain resorts on an Indian burial ground. It goes well with the "move the whole damned graveyard you cheap bastard" moral from Poltergeist.

Uh, no.

The only similarities between the book and the movie were the names and locations. Otherwise, they are two different things. What you describe is NOT what happened, not even remotely.

SK was right to be pissed at Kubrik. He changed the story so much is bears no resemblance at all with the book. I'm not sure why he even bothered to call it "The Shining". It was pretty obvious he wanted to do an entirely different movie, so he should have just done the movie he wanted to do and not had any connection with the book at all (which, come to think of it, is pretty much what he did).

*grabs flamethrower*

On my way there now.

Exterminas:
The Shining was by Stephen King?

Wow. Did not knew that, despite loving the movie. I am a shame to nerddom.

Indeed you are! Although, I can actually see how people come to that conclusion, what with Kubrick's genius direction and nicholson's quite frankly, insane performance overshadowing even King's initial writing.

Anyways, this sounds pretty damn cool, even if I do wonder how much link this is gonna have to the original. I do hope I can add it to the list of books attempting to smash twilight's ruining of vampires as horror characters, alongside Guillermo del toro and chuck hogans' the strain, which I know I mention alot, but seriously, it's awesome.

This sounds about as necessary and interesting as a Highlander sequel.

The only contiguous horror/thriller/suspense (whatever form you prefer. I'm not going to split hairs over the genre) series I've liked was the Odd Thomas series by Koontz, and even then it started falling apart after the second book.

There's something inherently wrong with writing sequels to books that are meant to be suspenseful. If there's a sequel, then it kind of implies that the original premise (or characters) is at least somewhat intact.

That reminds me, I kept wanting to actually read The Shining...

DasDestroyer:
That reminds me, I kept wanting to actually read The Shining...

me too though my hatred of stephen king and most his writing makes me hesitant to read it.

in true king form.

What with how Patrick popped up in the Dark Tower after Insomnia. And Cynthia Smith popping up in Desperation after mucking around in Rose Madder. And of course Father Callahan losing hsi faith in 'Salem's Lot only to appear in the dark tower.

...

Plus he did the same with The Talisman and the Black House.

I don know. Im a king fan, so I'll probably enjoy it. It sounds good on paper, especially since it akes place in the future rather then right after Danny's stay. So yeah, cant wait.

The fact that Steven King did not like Kubrick's film of The Shining leads me to believe that:

1. The book is probably not worth the trouble.
2. The sequel is probably worth less.

Stehpen King writing a new book - or George Lucas making a new movie (or editing his old ones)...

The HORROR!

Worr Monger:
The fact that Steven King did not like Kubrick's film of The Shining leads me to believe that:

1. The book is probably not worth the trouble.
2. The sequel is probably worth less.

In my experience, people who like the movie dislike the book, and vica versa. Personally, I think that movie is a stinking pile of ****, while the book is really good (not my favorite of his, which is The Stand, but in the top 5). But some people seem to think it's a classic. To each his own, I guess :)

Oh dear... I'm a fan of King's older work, and some of his newer novels, but it's become painfully clear that he's nowhere near the writer he used to be. As horrible and callous as it no doubt sounds, I think it's in part due to his giving up the booze and drugs. When you're a cocaine snorting alcoholic, your mind often goes to pretty dark places, and I think that's where a lot of his most succesful horror stories came from. Since going clean, he's just not been the same as a writer.

And that's not even mentioning that bloody van crash he was involved in... again, I don't mean to sound callous, and I'm glad that he didn't get killed in that accident, but goddamn did he ever go on about it afterwards. That one bloody accident he had ruined the Dark Tower series. Instead of carrying on his acid-western/fantasy mashup, he turned the Dark Tower series into his own personal therapy sessions. Up until the fifth book, that series was doing fantastically.

Ah well, he's going to do what he's going to do.

Why make a sequel? Sequels to classics are never as good, and to do it so much later just seems like a money-grab.

Only Stephen King book I have read was 'IT' and to put it frankly, IT was crappy. There was chapters of pointless bullshit, chapters of nothing and then a whole chapter about 13yr olds having sex.

Im done with him for now. Ill stick to the Tolkien and The Horus Heresy books.

Stephen King is a decent writer, but it truly bewilders that he's one of the most recognizable novelists names. His work isn't some prelude to the second coming of jesus or something.

 

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