TorrentFreak Reveals Top Pirated Games of 2011

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theonecookie:
So the WII has more piracy than the Xbox is it me or is that bit odd

It's not that it has more privacy...

Just more that most gamers older than 10 hate the WII as a rule, meaning less downloads. Me included.

saregos:

Mike Kayatta:
Even 700,000 copies of a full-priced Xbox title is still a painful $42,000,000 of potential revenue loss.
....
It wouldn't be fair to say that every pirated copy represents a lost sale, but it would be equally unfair to say that every copy didn't.

So why did you? And if you actually read the studies (instead of jumping into an "OMG PIRACY IS BAD" mentality)

He didn't. He said "potential revenue loss". If every pirate bought the game they otherwise copied, that would be the maximum revenue loss. "Potential" does not mean "Definitive". The problem with digital products is that it is harder to visualise the financial loss. Suppose a car gets stolen from a dealer: they would say that the car is worth $5000 and so they have basically lost that much money. Even if the thief argues that "I wasn't going to buy the car, if I couldn't steal it", it wouldn't make a difference. The dealer is obviously still out of pocket by one car.

1) Most pirates, if they like the game, will purchase it at some point in the future. Oftentimes the pirated copy is treated as a glorified demo (and I'll note, by the way, that none of the games called out above have demos), as that particular bit of customer service has fallen by the wayside in the interest of bigger margins.

I find it hard to believe that most pirates would buy all the games they stole and liked. Suggesting that they do is as dishonest as claiming every lost game is a lost sale, because they both make sweeping generalisations about the habits of pirates. Thinking about it, if someone is willing to steal something in the first place, it doesn't seem very likely that they will ever intend to paying for it later. Fairly obvious proof to this is the old World of Goo example. The developer 2DBOY revealed that 80-90% of people who own World of Goo pirated it. If those people genuinely were going to buy the game later, than 2DBOY would surely be expecting a ton of revenue from those 80-90% of players. Such money did not materialise.

As for the lack of demos: it is harder and less necessary to make demos in this day and age. Harder because of the technical difficultues, and unecessary because of the massive number of reviews, forums, lets plays, and other avenues in which customers can find out about the game in advance. Back in the days before the widespread popularity of the internet, demos were vital. Now they aren't. Contrary to popular opinion, a demo isn't that much better at demonstrating a game to a consumer, so it isn't really that big of a loss.

2) Of those pirates who don't buy the game, the vast majority would not have bought it even if a pirated version wasn't available.

So they are opportunists. That isn't an excuse.

You're being disingenuous even putting a number like $42M in your article. Actual losses are a tiny fraction of that... although, as you point out, it's not fair to say it's zero, it's also fair to say it's much, much closer to zero than 42M.

Ignoring the fact that we don't know how many pirates would have bough the game if they couldn't steal it, companies also lose cash due to having to make the game, print it onto DVDs or provide the bandwith for digital distribution etc. If a business went to the expense of making a car, advertising it and putting it in a show room, only to have it stolen anyway, they basically wasted all the money invested in providing that vehicle. So if anything, the losses could be even greater for all we know, taking into consideration those factors.

The point that needs raising is that study after study after study (and I mean real studies, not industry shill studies) have demonstrated that piracy is a symptom of a failure in customer service - i.e. the pirate almost universally produces a better product than the studio in at least some respects.

So does all theft. Think about it: stealing anything provides you with a "try before you buy" opportunity. Theft is the ultimate customer service, or rather, the ultimate self-service. That is the reason why there are pirates or thieves, but in no way does that justify or excuse theft.

I'm pretty sure one of the reasons Crysis 2 was the most pirated on PC was because they could even play multiplayer with the pirated game for the first month or so. I remember people doing this.

Freezy_Breezy:

Mike Kayatta:
The industry faces yet another year of massive loss

Size of global game market revenue:

$65 billion, up from $62.7 billion in 2010.

OH BOY LOOK AT ALL THAT LOSS

THEY SURE ARE GOING DOW- OH WAIT THAT'S UP.

Christ, do you even do any factchecking?

Source: http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/06/06/us-videogames-factbox-idUKTRE75552I20110606

That is 'revenue', it says nothing about how much profit the gaming industry made.

Also that is the number for the entire gamining industry (software + subscriptions + hardware) not just software.

Software sales are actually slightly down (according to your link).

However this could be explained by a shift to online games (which has increased revenue)

rembrandtqeinstein:
There is no fundamental difference between not buying a game because it is downloaded and not buying it because of any other reason.

Except if you download it then you have use of the software.

I have been a coder for over 30 years, I know piracy has cost me money.

People have emailed me asking to support their pirated copy...

SillyBear:

Tubez:
Meh I really do not care, and in no way is a download a lost sale.

I don't agree with that. I think many of those people who pirated the game would have bought the game if it wasn't so easily available to pirate.

You can't claim that none of the millions of people who pirated Modern Warfare 3 wouldn't have purchased it otherwise.

It's true that you can't claim that "None" of the people would, but most wouldn't.

Why? Because they don't have that much money. That's why.

Game companies tend to have this ridiculous belief that every time someone pirates their game, they take the money they just "saved" and stuff it under their bed until they have their own little pirate treasure down there. That's not how it works. The money 90% of pirates "save" are spent elsewhere, often on other entertainment (for example, other games, or perhaps music, movies, or even real-life entertainment like movie theater or partying).

In short, the problem is that there is always going to be a player that "suffers" for the non-existant money that pirates are supposed to have. Right now the industry is claiming losses, but imagine if we could make all piracy disappear tomorrow. Then the industry might not be claiming losses anymore, but suddenly the clubs, liquor stores etc. would see their income drop because some of the former pirates would now be using more money to purchase digital entertainment and less money to purchase those things. Hell, even indie game developers would suffer from it because people who used to buy indie games and pirate big titles would now be buying big titles instead.

The point I'm trying to make is that companies (not just from the entertainment industry, but basically any company that sells what can be classified as luxury-goods) are fighting over non-existent money they believe to exist. But they don't, so someone is always going to be stuck with the short end of the stick (as-in, their product doesn't get purchased because you can't use the non-existent money for that). Fighting piracy is, at best, going to shift that balance, but someone is ALWAYS going to end up being the loser.

Sober Thal:
Billions of dollars worth of product distributed that wasn't payed for.

Yes, that is a loss. Damn asshats.

You mean, "however many dollars worth of product distributed that wouldn't have been purchased anyway. Asshats."

Put it this way. I didn't buy Oblivion, but Skyrim got released anyway.

Hey, how do people get stuff for free I have to pay for. I hate being a goody-two-shoes law abiding citizen sometimes.

I don't know if it's good or bad for them that CoD was unseated from first place (they usually win), but I'm happy either way.
Given that Xenoblade was pirated so much, maybe NoA will think again next time they ignore something like operation rainfall.

rolfwesselius:

BoogieManFL:
I'd also venture a guess that the numbers have something to do with far more people having computers than consoles.

Also, lack of demos. I firmly believe not having a demo for your game greatly increases how much it's pirated.

crysis 2 has gaikai in browser dmeo´s im playing one right now look
http://www.screwattack.com/game-trials#Client
so that is a flaw in your argument the most pirated game had a multiplayer demo
and in browser demo´s this was just pure piracy and "prtesting" pc gamers.

I was speaking more in general of the overall PC vs. Console pirating issue and not just strictly relating to this one post.

Hey guys guess what? despite these shocking figures Game publishers still turn a profit year on year even during a recession!

As long as the game is good or hyped enough or has a large online element then people usuallly buy it to be free of the hassle of the hit and miss process of dling and installing cracked games.

saregos:

1) Most pirates, if they like the game, will purchase it at some point in the future. Oftentimes the pirated copy is treated as a glorified demo (and I'll note, by the way, that none of the games called out above have demos), as that particular bit of customer service has fallen by the wayside in the interest of bigger margins.

Don't give people that shit, you know 90% of pirates simply don't give a shit about the developer and just want free games. Even if you plan to buy it afterwards, it's hard to justify buying that new game for €50 when you already have it on your hard drive so most people don't(and buying it two years later on sale for €5 doesn't count)

maninahat:
The dealer is obviously still out of pocket by one car.

...

I find it hard to believe that most pirates would buy all the games they stole and liked.

...

if someone is willing to steal something in the first place

...

If a business went to the expense of making a car, advertising it and putting it in a show room, only to have it stolen anyway, they basically wasted all the money invested in providing that vehicle.

You're missing (deliberately, I think) one very important point:
PIRACY IS NOT THEFT
If I steal your car, you are indeed out a car. If I copy your book, you still have your book. It's disingenuous in the extreme (and debunked many, many times, not that it stops people from making the comparison) to pretend that pirating a game and stealing something are equivalent.

mrc390:

Don't give people that shit, you know 90% of pirates simply don't give a shit about the developer and just want free games.

Evidence? Citation? Anything? No? Ok then. Just verifying that you're pulling unfounded, morally sacrosanct bullshit out of your ass.

And I'll note that if "90% of pirates don't buy the game", that's still 10% more sales than you would have had if nobody had pirated at all.

There's a very strong argument to be made that what really hurts developers is obscurity, not piracy. When most developers are putting out samey crap and sequels every cycle, gaining the additional exposure from piracy could actually help a game's sales, if it's good enough (or unique enough) to withstand the additional scrutiny.

And, since the developer isn't out anything other than a "potential sale" (again, from someone likely to not buy the game if no pirated version existed) it could easily be argued that piracy potentially increases revenue.

Mike Kayatta:

saregos:
snip

Whoops, sorry. When you said: "Tend not to have the unskippable 'this company made this game!' crap at the beginning," I thought you meant you didn't want to see the logos of those who made the games.

Because... I don't. I know who made the game, it's really stupid to force me to sit through their animated logos (and in some cases the intro cutscene for the game) every time I want to play. And when the pirated version doesn't force you into seeing them, it's a better product.

Mike Kayatta:
When you said: "Aren't as restricted (DRM and install limit wise)" and "In some cases, provide additional features. For example, LAN play or local multiplayer," I thought you meant that you wanted altered versions of people's products.

No, what I'd really like is for developers to actually provide a product that isn't deliberately crippled. But when they remove (or skip) features that would improve the product, and the pirates add them in, then the pirates are providing a better product.

Mike Kayatta:
When you said: "Provide a try-before-you-buy opportunity. I.e. the ability to try that $60 game before you make a $60 commitment," I thought you meant taking someone's product without paying them.

Ever hear of this thing called a "demo"? Pirates provide them, developers no longer do. Again, pirates are providing a better product.

Mike Kayatta:
And since I want to stop "driving people to piracy" with my attitude, I suppose I'll start advocating the practice in order to quell it.

Where, precisely, have I advocated piracy? I've simply been pointing out (correctly) that it's largely a symptom of a larger problem - that developers are not providing a better product than the pirates are.

Provide demos, go back to having the logos be skippable, stop pulling features, etc. Start providing the product that people ACTUALLY WANT. And you'll probably see lower piracy (or, actually, higher sales... because piracy really doesn't matter).

Or, we can continue to criminalize, demonize and persecute customers. And continue to lock the product down in a fruitless attempt to quell piracy (an effort which, I'll note, only actually winds up hurting legitimate customers).

That sounds like a much better plan than innovating and adapting to a changing market. Judging by your behavior, I assume you support SOPA as well?

I have yet to see any proof that 1 download equals 1 lost sale. As far as I have seen, from friends who use torrents, at least 90% of all downloads happen because people hears a lot about the game and want to try it before they buy it.

The companies making horrible demo versions which make the game look like something it just isn't - or even making no demo what so ever is hardly the consumers fault.

Would you ever buy a car without trying it? Or buy a house without seeing the interior? Or a board game, for that matter, without reading what it is about and having some sense of how it actually looks inside? I know I wouldn't and I have no idea why game companies think they should be exempt from the concept of try-before-you-buy.

Yes there are people who just wont pay for stuff they like and that is not right but saying that "because some of a certain group are very unlikeable people, that entire group is unlikeable". That is how racism, sexism and all other "isms" work and they do not exactly contribute much good to society.

And yes I did just compare hating "all pirates regardless of their intent" to being an internet racist. As long as people actually pay for stuff they like and ignore stuff they do not like I find it quite moral that they should get to try the stuff and see if they like it.

Let the flow of hate mails commence

Mike Kayatta:

the computer community is plagued by more than three times the amount of virtual theft

Piracy is wrong, but it's not theft. I'm starting to think Escapist writers get a commission for every time they beat up the ebil, ebil pirates as the worst people in the world.

Seriously, get a new villain to beat up, the pirate one is just getting stale. Try Bobby Kotick, I'm sure he's said something stupid recently.

EtherealBeaver:
I have yet to see any proof that 1 download equals 1 lost sale.

You never will see that proof, because that isn't true.

That doesn't make piracy legally or morally acceptable, but people need to get the fuck off of this 'it's -stealing-!' line.

No, it's not, it can be wrong without being the same as swiping an ipod from Best Buy.

Deegamah:
Hmm... I'm noticing a distinct lack of 4.5 million Witcher 2 downloads.

That wasn't actually an accurate number, just a developer estimation.

I see that most pirated PC games are the ones that aren't really worth playing in the first place. Portal 2 excluded of course.

Why would anyone pirate Portal 2? If anyone deserves your money it's Valve. Are people trying to say that they can shell out $500 or more for a PC but they can't spend $40 on Portal 2?

BoogieManFL:
I'd also venture a guess that the numbers have something to do with far more people having computers than consoles.

Also, lack of demos. I firmly believe not having a demo for your game greatly increases how much it's pirated.

I think its more to do with the fact that its far easier to pirate on a PC, although more people do own PCs yes

saregos:

1) Most pirates, if they like the game, will purchase it at some point in the future. Oftentimes the pirated copy is treated as a glorified demo (and I'll note, by the way, that none of the games called out above have demos), as that particular bit of customer service has fallen by the wayside in the interest of bigger margins.

2) Of those pirates who don't buy the game, the vast majority would not have bought it even if a pirated version wasn't available.

For one, Battlefield 3 had a beta that was essentially a demo. That's not an excuse. It wouldn't be anyways, as most pirates don't buy the games. Look, I can say things as if they're fact too.

To point 2, I wouldn't have bought that candy bar if I couldn't have stolen it. Herp derp.

Just a few things to consider.

You can't rent PC games.

You can't resell PC games (though you can trade on Steam, now).

You can't return PC games (even if they're unplayable).

When buying a game becomes a gamble, and finances are tight, I think there's an obvious solution to the problem. Not saying it's right, but there is a lot of motivation to pirate.

Raiyan 1.0:

Mike Kayatta:
snip

Eh. There's millions upon millions of gamers in places like South East Asia and Eastern Europe where video game prices are beyond their means, or there aren't any legit retail stores, or games aren't localized via digital distribution. A friend of mine went back to his home in Bangladesh for holiday and suddenly found out he couldn't buy any games on Steam because they were region-locked.

Do they have any other choice other than to pirate this stuff?

And trust me, you don't need expensive hardware to run PC games. My rig is running on an ancient ATi HD4350, and guess what? I finished Crysis 2 just fine (albeit at 800X600 resolution and low FOV).

Say, where's the report on handheld piracy numbers?

It's an interesting point. I always look at it as potential western buyers pirating the stuff but obviously most of the pirating will occur in countries where the average gamer can aford about 1 game every 3 years.

saregos:

1) Most pirates, if they like the game, will purchase it at some point in the future.

I have spent over 15 years in hardcore PC gaming; pretty much the instant I had full reign over a computer.

In all of that time, I have met dozens of gamers personally, a great many of whom pirated like you couldn't believe and were only too happy to say as such.

Many of my former colleagues in college and high school chief among them. For every PC game they bought legitimately, I estimate (from memory) that they pirated around 30, and that's a conservative estimate.

I don't buy that into that "try before buy" pirate argument one bit.
In fact, if piracy were not so nebulous and widespread, I'd call that argument an outright lie. But for fairness sake, I must accept reasonable doubt for the sake of argumentation.

All of my experiences in reality directly contradicts that hearsay, and it isn't a trend limited to just my region circle of friends. I see this all over the place at tech conventions, online and even in public.

I have seen entire binders full of DVDs/CDs with illicit software from the beta of Vista to the entire EA collection. When I asked why they don't just support the developers of the software they like, they shrug or maintain the "Because I can" attitude.

Why on earth would you pirate Portal 2? What have Valve done to incur this?

Or is it just people anal anguished about the idea of completely optional, next to no point since it's cosmetic for the co-op skins being sold? Or that you can buy the unlockable gestures early?

Wolfram01:
Just a few things to consider.

You can't rent PC games.

Wrong. http://www.direct2drive.com/

You can't resell PC games (though you can trade on Steam, now).

Wrong. http://www.ebay.com/

You can't return PC games (even if they're unplayable).

Wrong. http://www.ebgames.com/gs/help/Returns.aspx

When buying a game becomes a gamble, and finances are tight, I think there's an obvious solution to the problem. Not saying it's right, but there is a lot of motivation to pirate.

There is no motivation to pirate other than being an elitist prick that thinks your personal convenience/desires/financial situation outweighs those of the people who actually did the work and built the game.

Mike Kayatta:

Irridium:
People pirated Crysis 2 the most?

...

Why?

Also, do they have numbers for how much Witcher 2 was pirated? I believe pretty much everyone, including the developers, thought that it was 4.5 million or more. Would be nice to know the actual area of the numbers. Since it's obviously not that much, otherwise it'd be on the list.

I think that Crysis is known as a bit of a benchmark, so many people likely downloaded it to see how it would run on their rigs. Notice that the console version of game wasn't on the top five of the other list. That may point to a PC-specific reason deeper than gamers just "wanting that game the most." That's just my personal speculation, though.

Sounds reasonable enough. It definitely is the best game for such a test out right now.

I'm a bit confused by the amount of console rips. Is it that easy to rip a console game now?

Tubez:
Meh I really do not care, and in no way is a download a lost sale. Just look at studies done on this.

But I cannot believe that people have downloaded fifa 3.4 millions times on pc...

i cant believe people play FIFA....are people fucking retarded? its a sports game! not even a good sport! its soccer! SOCCER! you can play it with a coconut and 8 sticks to mark the goals and boundaries!

Mike Kayatta:

saregos:

Mike Kayatta:

Yes, aren't they great!? We don't have to read about the thousands of people who labored for years to make something! We don't have to pay! We get unlimited demos! OF COURSE this is better; who wouldn't want this superior product? You've completely made me rethink my position. If only I'd considered how totally awesome it is to take someone's product from them and alter it however you'd like without paying them for it before writing this article! Games are like some sort of magical fruit that the universe randomly blips into creation. We should be free to take them and enjoy them whenever and however we want because clearly the universe will just magically continue to create more of them for us to take. And you know why? Because we're entitled to them. Never forget that!

Uh... what? Did you read anything I said? Or are you just going to attack me (and a pretty little straw-man you set up for the purpose) for disagreeing with you?

Once more - Pirates currently provide a better product. Because they're more in-tune with what the customer wants. So maybe, instead of attacking the pirates (and while you're at it, anyone who disagrees with you, or points out flaws in your reasoning) you should concentrate on how to make the legitimate product better than the pirated one?

But no, instead you'll completely misinterpret everything I said. I would have expected better, but that's all too common.

Enjoy your high horse. But it's attitudes precisely like yours that drive piracy in the first place.

By the way, thanks so much for editing out the part where I pointed out that this is a failure in customer service. Probably because you can't address that?

Whoops, sorry. When you said: "Tend not to have the unskippable 'this company made this game!' crap at the beginning," I thought you meant you didn't want to see the logos of those who made the games. When you said: "Aren't as restricted (DRM and install limit wise)" and "In some cases, provide additional features. For example, LAN play or local multiplayer," I thought you meant that you wanted altered versions of people's products. When you said: "Provide a try-before-you-buy opportunity. I.e. the ability to try that $60 game before you make a $60 commitment," I thought you meant taking someone's product without paying them. Sorry, I guess I really did misinterpret you, huh. Won't happen again.

And since I want to stop "driving people to piracy" with my attitude, I suppose I'll start advocating the practice in order to quell it ... because that makes sense. Thanks for the tip. Either way, I've got to stop replying to comments and get back to my high horse. He's likely got the munchies by now.

That's not what he means. Both of you have gotten into a pointless argument. A severe issue is that Pirates offer a better service. They offer games before release, at zero cost, with little threat of legal rammification, and don't punish the customer.

Meanwhile, publishers make their service worse, Ubisofts DRM, One-time passes, etc, and increase the prices of their games. This makes the piracy seem like a better deal. It is. It's also wrong, but the customer cares about the customer. The publisher should pay attention to this. Always on DRM? Not helpful, and it makes piracy better (Assassins Creed 2 is a game I am yet to finish due to that). Expensive DLC, and shorter games? Makes me able to buy less games, and makes the pirated copy even less of a hassle by comparison.

In contrast, Steam, is always on DRM, BUT, it offers social networking, game sales, VOIP, special deals, cloud storage, and unlimited downloads. See, if more took a leaf from Valve's book, and improved the service (And Steam is booming), rather than punishing the customer, then they'd be more likely to get sales. Reducing the stupid prices wouldn't go astray either.

If the pirates can offer a better service, then people will have no reason to buy games properly. Which is a terrible shame, because that hurts games in general.

saregos:

maninahat:
The dealer is obviously still out of pocket by one car.

...

I find it hard to believe that most pirates would buy all the games they stole and liked.

...

if someone is willing to steal something in the first place

...

If a business went to the expense of making a car, advertising it and putting it in a show room, only to have it stolen anyway, they basically wasted all the money invested in providing that vehicle.

You're missing (deliberately, I think) one very important point:
PIRACY IS NOT THEFT
If I steal your car, you are indeed out a car. If I copy your book, you still have your book. It's disingenuous in the extreme (and debunked many, many times, not that it stops people from making the comparison) to pretend that pirating a game and stealing something are equivalent.

That game has a price tag, you illegally didn't pay that price that's theft plain and simple.

lord.jeff:

saregos:

maninahat:
The dealer is obviously still out of pocket by one car.

...

I find it hard to believe that most pirates would buy all the games they stole and liked.

...

if someone is willing to steal something in the first place

...

If a business went to the expense of making a car, advertising it and putting it in a show room, only to have it stolen anyway, they basically wasted all the money invested in providing that vehicle.

You're missing (deliberately, I think) one very important point:
PIRACY IS NOT THEFT
If I steal your car, you are indeed out a car. If I copy your book, you still have your book. It's disingenuous in the extreme (and debunked many, many times, not that it stops people from making the comparison) to pretend that pirating a game and stealing something are equivalent.

That game has a price tag, you illegally didn't pay that price that's theft plain and simple.

No. It's copyright infringement, not theft. The law is extremely clear on this point. You might want to do some research before you start professing things.

lord.jeff:

saregos:
snip

That game has a price tag, you illegally didn't pay that price that's theft plain and simple.

No, it's not.

Let's try this again -
If I steal something from you, then you no longer have it.
If I copy something of yours, you haven't been deprived of any physical property.

How is that so hard to understand?

You are legally, factually and conceptually WRONG in the assertion that "piracy is theft".

Loonyyy:
In contrast, Steam, is always on DRM, BUT, it offers social networking, game sales, VOIP, special deals, cloud storage, and unlimited downloads. See, if more took a leaf from Valve's book, and improved the service (And Steam is booming), rather than punishing the customer, then they'd be more likely to get sales. Reducing the stupid prices wouldn't go astray either.

Which is why Portal 2 is number 5 on the list, right -- despite it being 75% off not so very long ago during the Steam Christmas sale. Because of the lousy service and price.. oh wait.

If the pirates can offer a better service, then people will have no reason to buy games properly. Which is a terrible shame, because that hurts games in general.

See above.

Here's the truth: Pirates are simply self-entitled cheapskates. They put their own desire and imaginary entitlement to have something for free ahead of the desires and actual entitlements of the people who put in the long hours and may even lose families over "crunch time" to put out great games for us.

And then they have asshats who like to run around claiming either that the companies deserve it for poor customer service, so it's okay.

Or that the prices are more than they personally want to pay, so it's okay.

Or that the companies aren't physically losing anything, so it's okay.

Or that the companies are making money anyway, so it's okay.

Or that the companies aren't putting out the exact types of demos or products that they want, so it's okay.

Or that because some had no intent to buy it anyway, it's okay.

Or because of some BS reason like not being able to resell the games that's not true in the first place, it's okay.

Hell.. I don't even think that the problem is the pirates these days so much as it is the people like you who run around making excuses for them so that they don't even have to feel bad about it.

Kwil:

Wolfram01:
Just a few things to consider.

You can't rent PC games.

Wrong. http://www.direct2drive.com/

You can't resell PC games (though you can trade on Steam, now).

Wrong. http://www.ebay.com/

You can't return PC games (even if they're unplayable).

Wrong. http://www.ebgames.com/gs/help/Returns.aspx

When buying a game becomes a gamble, and finances are tight, I think there's an obvious solution to the problem. Not saying it's right, but there is a lot of motivation to pirate.

There is no motivation to pirate other than being an elitist prick that thinks your personal convenience/desires/financial situation outweighs those of the people who actually did the work and built the game.

Most games have this little thing called DRM that doesn't let you reactivate it to a different account.

EB games sells 2 PC games - Starcraft and Warcraft.

I didn't know D2D does rentals now, so that's great. But that's only 1 service.

Regardless, pirating the game can serve the same purpose and if used for that purpose it helps the industry exactly as much as the former methods - exactly not at all. The big problem is abusing it - pirating all your games and never putting down cash.

Anyway try not to be suck a dick with your replies. I wasn't getting on some grand stand promoting pirating, just pointing out some fairly significant issues with PC gaming in general. I suppose you thought it went "unsaid" that I pirate for those reasons... actually, I don't. Those are just possible reasons why it's 3x worse than on consoles, on top of what many people say about buying pirated hard disks for consoles instead of downloading themselves, and games rarely having demos.

I pirate to piss people like you off.
Just joking

Loonyyy:
That's not what he means. Both of you have gotten into a pointless argument. A severe issue is that Pirates offer a better service. They offer games before release, at zero cost, with little threat of legal rammification, and don't punish the customer.

Meanwhile, publishers make their service worse, Ubisofts DRM, One-time passes, etc, and increase the prices of their games. This makes the piracy seem like a better deal. It is. It's also wrong, but the customer cares about the customer. The publisher should pay attention to this. Always on DRM? Not helpful, and it makes piracy better (Assassins Creed 2 is a game I am yet to finish due to that). Expensive DLC, and shorter games? Makes me able to buy less games, and makes the pirated copy even less of a hassle by comparison.

In contrast, Steam, is always on DRM, BUT, it offers social networking, game sales, VOIP, special deals, cloud storage, and unlimited downloads. See, if more took a leaf from Valve's book, and improved the service (And Steam is booming), rather than punishing the customer, then they'd be more likely to get sales. Reducing the stupid prices wouldn't go astray either.

If the pirates can offer a better service, then people will have no reason to buy games properly. Which is a terrible shame, because that hurts games in general.

Thank you. I am not, and never have, advocated piracy. But it's a symptom of the larger problem you describe above.

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