Not All ESA Members Believe In SOPA

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Not All ESA Members Believe In SOPA

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Even though most of the ESA's members seem to be toeing the party line, a few of them aren't staying quiet and supporting the Stop Online Piracy Act.

The ESA's support of the Stop Online Piracy Act hasn't exactly gone over well with people. You know, because it pretty much annihilates the working nature of the internet. However, the ESA is a large group, representing dozens of publishers and developers, and not all of them believe that this horrible bill is for the best.

Joystiq sent out an exhaustive number of emails to all ESA members, asking for their individual positions on the legislation. While many emails weren't responded to (which Joystiq took to mean as an admission by omission), at least four members have publicly come out against SOPA.

The full list from Joystiq is below. Any updates to it will be noted later on.

38 Studios - AGAINST - "Based on the SOPA bill's current structure, 38 Studios believes that the bill requires further restructuring and review to ensure it both preserves rights and protects intellectual properties."
345 Games - FOR (no response)
505 Games- FOR (no response)
Capcom USA, Inc. - FOR (dodging) - "At Capcom, we're game makers, not legislators. We do not have an internal stance on this particular issue and are not planning to. We'll get back to making games. Thanks."
Deep Silver - FOR (no response)
Disney Interactive Studios, Inc. -FOR (no response)
Eidos Interactive - FOR (no response)
Electronic Arts - FOR (dodging) - "EA never expressed a position for or against SOPA."
Epic Games - AGAINST - "We do not support the current version of SOPA,"
Her Interactive, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Ignition Entertainment - FOR (no response)
Konami Digital Entertainment - FOR (no response)
LEVEL-5 Inc. - FOR (no response)
Microsoft Corporation - FOR - But also against as a member of the Business Software Alliance.
Namco Bandai Games America Inc. - FOR (no response)
Natsume Inc. - FOR (no response)
Nexon America, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Nintendo of America Inc. - FOR (no response)
Nival - AGAINST - "Nival does not support SOPA, despite a deep understanding of the struggle against piracy in the games industry. Unfortunately, SOPA could do more harm to Internet freedom than good to fight piracy. We recognize the issues our partners in the online press have with this legislation. We will continue to be anti-piracy but are also anti-SOPA." The company also stated it shared its position with the ESA.
NVIDIA - FOR (no response)
O-Games, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Perfect World Entertainment - FOR (no response)
SEGA of America, Inc. - FOR (currently working on response)
Slang - FOR - "As an ESA member we are represented by the ESA in these matters."
Sony Computer Entertainment America - FOR (no response)
Sony Online Entertainment, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Square Enix, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Tecmo Koei America Corporation - FOR (no response)
THQ, Inc. - FOR - "We don't have an individual statement on this, but encourage you to seek statement from the ESA on the matter."
Trion Worlds, Inc. - AGAINST - "We definitely do not support SOPA."
Ubisoft Entertainment, Inc. - FOR (no response)
Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment Inc. - FOR (no response)
XSEED Games - FOR (no response)

Source: Joystiq

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Fascinating. Especially Epic, as they're a BIG company.

Although, it's a canny move in the current climate...stand firm with the public, while your people vote for the private. Either way, they win.

i find the 'we have no opinion' comments interesting, do they really not care, or are they trying to avoid massive back lash?

also o.0? Microsoft is for it in one place, and against it in another o.o?

Doesn't really matter. I know a couple DOZEN NRA members who don't support the policy, but as members they're still effectively part of the problem when the NRA campaigns to allow terrorists to get guns or what have you.

They are using your membership to weight their influence.

Microsoft Corporation - FOR - But also against as a member of the Business Software Alliance.
I love 'em :D

NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

I'm not surprised there are ESA members that don't support SOPA. It's an organization made of many companies, it will simply represent the bulk of them the best it can.

Edit: I'm surprised by some of the companies listed here. I think that many are just following suit without full understanding of what it implies... or, at least I hope.

I'm not gonna condemn those without a response, considering leads to situations like Microsoft would be for it and against it at the same time.

But those that HAVE responded in favor with more than "No comment"... Sega, Slang and THQ... well, there's three who have made their opinion known. And now I know how to make my opinion of you guys known.

Wow Capcom, dodge more? That's pathetic. If it affects your industry then you should have an opinion as a company, regardless if you "just make games".

Capcom:
"At Capcom, we're game makers, not legislators. We do not have an internal stance on this particular issue and are not planning to. We'll get back to making games. Thanks."

Wow, douchy response much? Kinda makes me want to punch whoever wrote that in the face for being a passive aggressive twit. I have no other words for that response other than it infuriates me in how they decided to be an ass rather than give a professional response.

I love how all the companies that are against SOPA actually gave a clear and well thought out response and 98% of the companies that are For SOPA chose to not respond at all and the other 2% (Capcom) are total nit wits about it.

What a joke. It's like the companies that support SOPA know how much hate they would get if they were actually honest with their customers about this.

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Also love that the ones that are against put out a press release stating why they're against it. The others, rightly so, have realised that they aren't really answerable to Joystiq, or anyone other than their shareholders on their motivations.

ResonanceSD:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Also love that the ones that are against put out a press release stating why they're against it. The others, rightly so, have realised that they aren't really answerable to Joystiq, or anyone other than their shareholders on their motivations.

Are you just saying this to be 'different'? You do realize you can be anti-piracy AND anti-SOPA. There's four companies on this list that are.

F4LL3N:

ResonanceSD:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Also love that the ones that are against put out a press release stating why they're against it. The others, rightly so, have realised that they aren't really answerable to Joystiq, or anyone other than their shareholders on their motivations.

Are you just saying this to be 'different'? You do realize you can be anti-piracy AND anti-SOPA. There's four companies on this list that are.

Oh yes, I'm not in full support of SOPA, however I think it's an excellent example of how far the industry is ready and willing to go in order to defend it's full profits. Pirates and gamers around the world seem to think that they're bluffing. For some weird reason. SOPA in it's current form isn't viable. However, take away some of the more ridiculous proposals in it and it's a great idea. From all the naysayers, Epic Games' official release in it's full form is the one I agree with most. However, if those companies were truly against SOPA, why aren't they leaving the ESA? I doubt that they'll be able to convince the major players on that list to change their positions, so why are they sticking around? To get brownie points with gamers?

Oh yes, I also love that "NOT ALL ESA MEMBERS BELIEVE IN SOPA" turns out to be, four.

ResonanceSD:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Valve's not there because they already solved the whole piracy thing.

Irridium:

ResonanceSD:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Valve's not there because they already solved the whole piracy thing.

you're right, there isn't a single pirated copy of Portal, Portal 2, Left 4 Dead or counterstrike, anywhere in the world. And you're right, no one pirated half-life either.

ResonanceSD:

Irridium:

ResonanceSD:

enjoy your catalyst drivers. Oh wait, they're terrible.

It's nice to see that most companies are for it. Where's valve?

Valve's not there because they already solved the whole piracy thing.

you're right, there isn't a single pirated copy of Portal, Portal 2, Left 4 Dead or counterstrike, anywhere in the world. And you're right, no one pirated half-life either.

Yes there's pirated copies of those games. But you seemed to have missed the point where Newell said that Valve has turned Russia into their second largest European market. And that they have evidence that when you offer a better service, more people will buy from you instead of pirating. Nobody will ever get rid of piracy, ever. But they can reduce piracy, and Valve is doing better than anyone else. To completely disregard the fact that they turned a nation with a reputation for pirating quite a bit into a huge paying market just because pirated copies of their games exist is... stupid.

Irridium:

ResonanceSD:

Irridium:

Valve's not there because they already solved the whole piracy thing.

you're right, there isn't a single pirated copy of Portal, Portal 2, Left 4 Dead or counterstrike, anywhere in the world. And you're right, no one pirated half-life either.

Yes there's pirated copies of those games. But you seemed to have missed the point where Newell said that Valve has turned Russia into their second largest European market. And that they have evidence that when you offer a better service, more people will buy from you instead of pirating. Nobody will ever get rid of piracy, ever. But they can reduce piracy, and Valve is doing better than anyone else. To completely disregard the fact that they turned a nation with a reputation for pirating quite a bit just because pirated copies of their games exist is... stupid.

Yes, however, that's not going to work for everyone. Valve, let's remember here, are not answerable to shareholders. Other companies are. You tell a bunch of shareholders that you can turn around RUSSIA'S piracy attitude towards your game with a different approach, you see how fast you get laughed out of an AGM. Valve's practices and successes have been admirable, but are simply not feasible for the vast majority of companies.

ResonanceSD:

Irridium:

ResonanceSD:

you're right, there isn't a single pirated copy of Portal, Portal 2, Left 4 Dead or counterstrike, anywhere in the world. And you're right, no one pirated half-life either.

Yes there's pirated copies of those games. But you seemed to have missed the point where Newell said that Valve has turned Russia into their second largest European market. And that they have evidence that when you offer a better service, more people will buy from you instead of pirating. Nobody will ever get rid of piracy, ever. But they can reduce piracy, and Valve is doing better than anyone else. To completely disregard the fact that they turned a nation with a reputation for pirating quite a bit just because pirated copies of their games exist is... stupid.

Yes, however, that's not going to work for everyone. Valve, let's remember here, are not answerable to shareholders. Other companies are. You tell a bunch of shareholders that you can turn around RUSSIA'S piracy attitude towards your game with a different approach, you see how fast you get laughed out of an AGM. Valve's practices and successes have been admirable, but are simply not feasible for the vast majority of companies.

Well it's obvious they need to try something different than what they're doing now. Since what they're doing now isn't doing anything to damage piracy. Valve seems to have found the best way to fight piracy. To ignore it and not even try to do something different would be just incompetent on the part of the company and shareholders. Since it's obvious that what they're currently doing is a failure, continuing to do it, and/or passing a law that lets them essentially shut down whatever they think is bad, and expecting different or better results is just insanity.

Irridium:

ResonanceSD:

Irridium:

Yes there's pirated copies of those games. But you seemed to have missed the point where Newell said that Valve has turned Russia into their second largest European market. And that they have evidence that when you offer a better service, more people will buy from you instead of pirating. Nobody will ever get rid of piracy, ever. But they can reduce piracy, and Valve is doing better than anyone else. To completely disregard the fact that they turned a nation with a reputation for pirating quite a bit just because pirated copies of their games exist is... stupid.

Yes, however, that's not going to work for everyone. Valve, let's remember here, are not answerable to shareholders. Other companies are. You tell a bunch of shareholders that you can turn around RUSSIA'S piracy attitude towards your game with a different approach, you see how fast you get laughed out of an AGM. Valve's practices and successes have been admirable, but are simply not feasible for the vast majority of companies.

Well it's obvious they need to try something different than what they're doing now. Since what they're doing now isn't doing anything to damage piracy. Valve seems to have found the best way to fight piracy. To ignore it and not even try to do something different would be just incompetent on the part of the company and shareholders. Since it's obvious that what they're currently doing is a failure, continuing to do it, and/or passing a law that lets them essentially shut down whatever they think is bad, and expecting different or better results is just insanity.

Oh, but it's not insanity. They are trying something different to achieve a goal they've had for a while.

"Dear shareholders, if we pass this law, our profit will increase, and you'll get more money". That's the conversation needed to get a company to agree to doing something. Right there. The industry is not going to take it on faith that consumers will stop pirating. Why would they? They can currently get stuff for free, offering cheaper/more diverse/more expensive games for a price can't compete with that. In the absence of a viable method of competing with "content for free", you'll see SOPA. And for a limited time, Spanish SOPA! Which I think comes into effect soon.

If they're really against it, then those 4 companies need to leave the organization. Normally, I'd think that was an unreasonably extreme position to hold, but the magnitude of this entire clusterfuck warrants. SOPA is bad enough and the ESA is vocal enough in support of it that I will continue to equate membership in the ESA as prima facie evidence of support for SOPA.

ResonanceSD:

Oh, but it's not insanity. They are trying something different to achieve a goal they've had for a while.

"Dear shareholders, if we pass this law, our profit will increase, and you'll get more money". That's the conversation needed to get a company to agree to doing something. Right there. The industry is not going to take it on faith that consumers will stop pirating. Why would they? They can currently get stuff for free, offering cheaper/more diverse/more expensive games for a price can't compete with that. In the absence of a viable method of competing with "content for free", you'll see SOPA. And for a limited time, Spanish SOPA! Which I think comes into effect soon.

They're not doing something different. They've done this kind of crap before.

For the movies/music industries, they've complained about this sort of thing before. In fact, they've been doing it since the damn 1920's.

1920's: Radio - Music on the radio is free, why would anyone buy music when they could get it for free?
1950's: broadcast television was free; the threat was cable television. Studios argued that their free TV content couldn't compete with paid.
1970's: VCR. The movie business fought it hard and were basically saying the same thing they are now. "It'll be the end of us! It'll doom the whole industry!"
1990's: DVD's are the threat. And this time, they actually got a law passed that made it illegal to make a digital copy of the video you already bought (Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Because piracy, or something.
2000's: DVR. Since you can now fast forward to commercials, no business will invest in commercials anymore, which will kill the TV business.
2010's: The internet. Since people can get stuff for free, why would they buy them?

Obviously, NONE of those things has led to the end of them. In fact, all of those things have been beneficial. Radio caused more people to hear more kinds of music, expanding tastes and interest, which fueled more music sales. Free broadcast television got more people interested in TV, which led to more people interested in the paid content as well as the free. VCR's opened up a brand new market for movie companies, causing their profits to skyrocket with the introduction of movie rentals. DVD's are essentially VHS' 2.0, and opened the doors for DVD rentals, which led to more profit (plus pretty much all Blu-Rays now come with a free digital copy of the movie, so apparently making a digital copy of a movie you own isn't as bad as they thought). DVR caused interest in television to soar.

And now we have the internet. As with all the other new media mediums, the big companies are saying it'll spell doom for them. And again, it opened up new avenues for consumption. With services like Netflix, now companies can reap the profits of streaming content. Services like iTunes, which makes it easier to sell music to people.

The problem isn't piracy. The problem is the movie/music industry's failure to adapt to new technology and capitalize on it. Something that is entirely their fault. Piracy in some form or another is rampant in one way or another in all forms of commerce. Retail stores call it shrinkage. Credit card companies call it fraud. But none of them need to go whining to the government to try and get restrictive legislation past to solve these problems. History has shown that time and market forces sooner or later provide a balance in balancing interests, whether the new technology is a video recorder, a computer, an MP3 player or now the internet. What the movie/music insdustries should be doing is using all that money they're throwing at congress to adapt to the changing market. Instead of trying to force it to stay the same.

For games, they really should be trying to do what Valve is doing, which is offering a better service than pirates. Currently none of them are doing it (with the possible exception of EA and their Origin platform, but they've got a LONG way to go), even though quite a bit seem keen on pushing "games as a service". Piracy isn't a price/quality issue (though those things may factor into it), it's mainly a service issue. And Valve has proven that offering a better service results in more profit. With SOPA, there's nothing to suggest it'll work. If anything, there's more evidence to suggest it'll fail. China has similar internet censorship laws, and that hasn't done shit to stop piracy over there. Pushing a law that has more evidence to suggest it'll fail then succeed, while ignoring other courses of action that point to profit, is either incredibly stupid, or a case of using piracy as a scapegoat to further some other goal.

Yup...thats the classic response from Capcom I would come to expect....oh Capcom...why do you do this to me...

Jove:
I love how all the companies that are against SOPA actually gave a clear and well thought out response and 98% of the companies that are For SOPA chose to not respond at all and the other 2% (Capcom) are total nit wits about it.

You do realize 'for' in this case meant 'didn't respond' and was just supposition on Joystiq's part, right? At least for the most part, there were a few that were actually for it.

I didn't realize abstaining meant you for something.

Christ, it's like the Iraq war logic all over again, but I guess it's ok if you aren't a Republican and you do it, eh?

"You don't have an opinion? I GUESS THAT MAKES YOU A FREEDOM HATING HIPPY TERRORIST!"

Capcom really hate everyone, don't they? That has to be the most dickish response from a company I've ever seen.

The supporters list isn't that surprising, but it's a shame to see how many companies have so little sense.

Irridium:
[quote="ResonanceSD" post="7.337321.13627933"]

The problem isn't piracy. The problem is the movie/music industry's failure to adapt to new technology and capitalize on it. Something that is entirely their fault. Piracy in some form or another is rampant in one way or another in all forms of commerce. Retail stores call it shrinkage. Credit card companies call it fraud. But none of them need to go whining to the government to try and get restrictive legislation past to solve these problems. History has shown that time and market forces sooner or later provide a balance in balancing interests, whether the new technology is a video recorder, a computer, an MP3 player or now the internet. What the movie/music insdustries should be doing is using all that money they're throwing at congress to adapt to the changing market. Instead of trying to force it to stay the same.

For games, they really should be trying to do what Valve is doing, which is offering a better service than pirates. Currently none of them are doing it (with the possible exception of EA and their Origin platform, but they've got a LONG way to go), even though quite a bit seem keen on pushing "games as a service". Piracy isn't a price/quality issue (though those things may factor into it), it's mainly a service issue. And Valve has proven that offering a better service results in more profit. With SOPA, there's nothing to suggest it'll work. If anything, there's more evidence to suggest it'll fail. China has similar internet censorship laws, and that hasn't done shit to stop piracy over there. Pushing a law that has more evidence to suggest it'll fail then succeed, while ignoring other courses of action that point to profit, is either incredibly stupid, or a case of using piracy as a scapegoat to further some other goal.

The original pirates were removed from the caribbean when the British realised the effects that they had on shipping were huge. The solution then was to hire pirates to go and get the other pirates. In a digital sense, that won't work. Also yes, theft isn't copyright infringement, etc. Let's get to the real point.

Now, how many game companies do you know of have the resources of Valve, and a similar ownership structure? I.e, a billion dollar private company? valve is a wonderful, unique case, in that they're a company with massive, massive amounts of revenue and no external oversight (pesky investors asking questions)

The reason that companies and studios pump out games is not primarily "because i want to share love and my games with the world", some guys woke up and said, I like designing games. I want to get paid doing this. Plenty of companies who sell their games through steam, origin, impulse, D2D are still seeing piracy. Even though the service is there which beats the traditional approach, no more dealing with idiots running a game store not having a clue about the industry they technically work in. So a game company, or in my company's case, a media corporation, sits back and goes "well we've shifted our model away from bricks and mortar and the problem is still there". I'm fairly certain that since the addition of netflix and pay per view services, movie piracy still exists, and the media industry is pissed off that they aren't getting the revenue that they're legally entitled to, even though they've gone to pretty big lengths in a relatively short time (for a massive industry) to combat piracy.

And then consumers turn around and say "YOU STILL CANT BEAT THE SERVICE AND PRICE THAT PIRATES PROVIDE, LLOLOLOL"

Which as you might understand, confuses the industry. They can't release games, movies or music for free. Somewhere down the line, people need to eat. Even that machine that restores your health in Chrono-Trigger still leaves you feeling hungry. lol

At a certain point the industry says "enough of this, if we have to compete with illegality through legal mechanisms, we'll lose anyway".

and so you have SOPA. A legal mechanism, which will 1) ruin the internet 2) not put a dent in the pirates that actually represent significant lost opportunities for revenue.
I'm going to interrupt the guy who jumps in here and says "NOT EVERY PIRATE REPRESENTS A LOSS OF A SALE"

Enough do to matter. And all of the other apologists for piracy, that it's too expensive, DRM is offensive, there isn't a demo, can also shut right up. These products are not now, and never have been, a right. They are all luxuries. A privilege. Anyone using any of the above excuses to justify their copyright infringement is "an entitled twerp" to use the in-house definition. If you're going to pirate, be honest and just say "i can't be arsed paying for this because I don't feel I have to". (@Irridium, I'm getting back on point right after this)

Back to the companies who are trying to enact laws rather than compete. The industry has made it's attempt to catch up to the digital age. The company I work for has more websites than I can count which put out information, media and related content over more markets than you can shake a stick at. However, people appropriate that information and pass it off as their own, word for word, like a shit uni student copying an essay, bypassing the methods we've enacted to prevent freeloading. So in my mind, we've caught up. And yet, despite our efforts, Pirates gonna pirate, 'yo.

TL:DR: The industry has had enough of apologists who aren't willing to see/understand how the world/business/economics/legal systems work. SOPA (unfortunately) has a lot of congressional support. We'll all be up shit creek without a boat soon, due to the fact that there are some market segments who will never stop illegally obtaining content. To those people, I thank you. My company is in full support of SOPA, I however am not. SOPA might however, increase our revenues like a boss. However, at the cost of the internet, the greatest invention of the last century, so I'll still have a job next year (21/12/12 be damned), however, it's entirely likely that sites like this will not exist.

what, you mean not everyone agrees, so the democratic solution was used and a majority vote as used as it is in most first world countries to solve their country's issues? How shocking.

really unless you're pulling some major clout, of which it looks like Epic is really the only who could, it doesnt really matter. but its nice to have this list and see how many people turn hypocrites and buy from companies that support SOPA.

emeraldrafael:
what, you mean not everyone agrees, so the democratic solution was used and a majority vote as used as it is in most first world countries to solve their country's issues? How shocking.

really unless you're pulling some major clout, of which it looks like Epic is really the only who could, it doesnt really matter. but its nice to have this list and see how many people turn hypocrites and buy from companies that support SOPA.

"Minor members of the ESA and Epic Games don't support SOPA, All game companies who have janitorial departments bigger than Epic Games still do" wouldn't be as good a headline.

Microsoft has perhaps the best answer. And Capcom... Capcom just cannot seem to do anything right according to the vocal community... Then again, most of Capcom's public messages have been "Leave us alone, we're trying to figure out new ways to screw over Megaman while making more zombie games."

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

Under the assumption that silence equals agreement. Notice how most of the "supporters" haven't responded (including Nvidia). For all we know, they don't support it (Why would they? They make hardware, not software) but just haven't said anything to avoid rocking the boat.

lacktheknack:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

Under the assumption that silence equals agreement. Notice how most of the "supporters" haven't responded (including Nvidia). For all we know, they don't support it (Why would they? They make hardware, not software) but just haven't said anything to avoid rocking the boat.

Yeah but companies like pfizer are behind it (pharma-tech), so the "wtf are they doing there" isn't quite as big a deal as it could be.

And if you're a GPU manufacturer, would you want to have a similar standpoint to companies who release games based on your platform? Or would you go "hi, everyone we work with, here's a reason for you to en-masse support A(MD/TI)."

I cant completly trust this list because of a few reasons.

1. We have no idea of the time frame given to the companies to respond.
2. We dont know if there could have been accidents in the sent email to deliver it to a bad address.
3. Also, "admission by omission" is a two sided knife. Sooo... ehhh.

On the other hand.

The ESA shows support for the majority.

So eh. But my own opinion is that every company who plays it off as "Eh, were neutral", is trying to dodge a major backlash in publicity and is only hiding behind the ESA for safety. That is what we call cowardice. If your a brave soul and support it, SAY IT. Id respect you more, even though I wouldnt want to buy your products.

lacktheknack:

DonTsetsi:
NVIDIA-FOR???? Uhh, maybe my next gpu will be ati, even though I've used NVidia for the 3 PCs I've had.

Under the assumption that silence equals agreement. Notice how most of the "supporters" haven't responded (including Nvidia). For all we know, they don't support it (Why would they? They make hardware, not software) but just haven't said anything to avoid rocking the boat.

They're FOR it because they're allowing the ESA to represent them. The companies that are AGAINST have stated it because silence DOES equal agreement in this case. It's akin to being part of a volunteer organisation that attempts something that you disagree with, and if you're against, you'll step to one side and say so. If you were for it, you'd just let your 'superiors' handle it.

I don't mean to sound ignorant, but say SOPA gets through. Will it effect Internet only in America or world wide. Because if it is the later, I will punch everyone responsible, in the soul.

ResonanceSD:
Oh yes, I'm not in full support of SOPA, however I think it's an excellent example of how far the industry is ready and willing to go in order to defend it's full profits. Pirates and gamers around the world seem to think that they're bluffing. For some weird reason. SOPA in it's current form isn't viable. However, take away some of the more ridiculous proposals in it and it's a great idea. From all the naysayers, Epic Games' official release in it's full form is the one I agree with most. However, if those companies were truly against SOPA, why aren't they leaving the ESA? I doubt that they'll be able to convince the major players on that list to change their positions, so why are they sticking around? To get brownie points with gamers?

The SOPA is a terrible idea, it won't affect piracy as at worst they'll just use the .bit domain and rendering any changes moot while destroying legitimate uses such as FAIR USE. This in effect weakens the DNS which has even more repercussions. It's current effect basically would destroy sites like youtube, facebook, etc. and the like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhwuXNv8fJM

TB on the SOPA, I'd recommend you watch it.

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