US Gov't Won't Pay for MegaUpload's 25 Million Gigabytes

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US Gov't Won't Pay for MegaUpload's 25 Million Gigabytes

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Hosting 25 petabytes of data costs $9,000 per day.

In January, the US government forcibly took down file-hosting site MegaUpload on charges that it had broken anti-piracy laws. While - let's face it - there was an astounding amount of copyrighted material on the MegaUpload servers, the service was also used for perfectly legitimate reasons by many, including the US government. Now, nobody can access their data, whether it was copyright-infringing or completely legal - but that data hasn't gone away.

In fact, it's still sitting on the servers that MegaUpload had been renting from storage company Carpathia. This isn't a small amount of data that could fit into a few hard drives, either - MegaUpload was hosting 25 petabytes' worth of files. That's enough to store 332 years of HD-quality video, half of the written works in the history of mankind, or the Library of Congress 1250 times over. Hosting that much data on 1,103 servers isn't cheap; Carpathia is on the hook for $9,000 every day just to keep the MegaUpload files around.

If you're wondering why Carpathia doesn't just turn the servers off to save power - it's not like the files will go anywhere - that's not the problem. Carpathia says that the servers are worth approximately $1,250,000, and if not for the MegaUpload files it could be selling them or renting them out to customers who haven't been shut down by the government. The climate-controlled center in which the servers are being stored costs an additional $37,000 per month to maintain, but that's a comparatively small cost.

The US government refuses to make taxpayers foot the bill for hosting the servers, or the time it would take to sort through 25 petabytes of data to figure out which files are legitimate and which are pirated. Prosecutor Jay Prabhu says that Carpathia had made $35 million from MegaUpload over the years, and had received "thousands of notices" that its servers were being used to host illegal content. Ergo, the government was under no obligation to pay for its preservation.

It doesn't seem as though there are many options on the table, either. MegaUpload and the MPAA have both objected to Carpathia deleting the data outright, for wholly different reasons - MegaUpload because it intends to return the legally-owned files to users, and the MPAA because it sees the files as evidence it can use in lawsuits.

Nor can Carpathia simply return the files to MegaUpload. Prosecutors have blocked any attempt to pursue that path, citing concerns that the file-sharing website would simply take the data overseas to relaunch operations beyond the reach of the courts. "It's like trusting the thief with the money," said Prabhu.

Either way, you can't help but feel bad for Carpathia. It can't get rid of its servers or repurpose them while the litigation is pending, and nobody wants to sift through 1250 Libraries of Congress to figure out what's legitimate and what's not. So for the moment, all it can do is bite its lip and hang on the hook.

Source: ACEDS

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When will people learn? If you want your assets protected, you store them in Switzerland.

Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

The whole "us government gets to tell the rest of the world what to do" aspect of this concerns the fuck out of me I must say. At this rate every file service ever is going to start hosting their servers in Switzerland.

Wow, that's a lot of data. Though, I imagine there's quite a few repeats in there. I wonder what the size of the unique content is.

That just ain't right. The government should either image the hard drives (ie what they normally do in computer crime cases) and release the originals back to Carpathia, or drop the case. In other words: shit or get off the potservers.

No I don't care that that would require tens of thousands of fresh hard drives and possibly cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Their footdragging has already cost Carpathia well over a million dollars.

BehattedWanderer:
Wow, that's a lot of data. Though, I imagine there's quite a few repeats in there. I wonder what the size of the unique content is.

Most cloud storage services use de-duplication, and MU being so big, yeah they would've had that going on in full. Probably a much smaller percent of dupes than you might imagine.

The people who want to save the data should get to sorting through it. If they're being blocked from doing it then I could put blame on the government but you relinquish control of the servers for less than a day and all that illegal content is going to be copy/pasta'd elsewhere. Serving the exact same purpose and having no difference from function besides from the pirates making the government jump through more hoops in jurisdiction arguments.

There was legitimate content on there is unfortunate collateral damage but Megaupload was the one who fucked it up by encouraging and collaborating to keep that pirated content up and profit from it. Government is just doing their job well and going after the right people in all this from the very start.

Everyone knows they can't go after individual pirates so go after the ones who make their actions possible by ignoring or cooperating with them. Megaupload, Pirate Bay, ect.

evilneko:

BehattedWanderer:
Wow, that's a lot of data. Though, I imagine there's quite a few repeats in there. I wonder what the size of the unique content is.

Most cloud storage services use de-duplication, and MU being so big, yeah they would've had that going on in full. Probably a much smaller percent of dupes than you might imagine.

Yeah, whenever a file is found to be a copy of one already stored, it just links to the copy already on file. But lately, many pirates have been forcing there files to be placed uniquely by compressing the files and giving the files a unique password.

Now that I think about it, how the hell do you go through Megaupload looking for pirated content when it's just a bunch of .Rar files you can't access without a password?

evilneko:

BehattedWanderer:
Wow, that's a lot of data. Though, I imagine there's quite a few repeats in there. I wonder what the size of the unique content is.

Most cloud storage services use de-duplication, and MU being so big, yeah they would've had that going on in full. Probably a much smaller percent of dupes than you might imagine.

True, but I'm more interested in knowing how many terabyte hard drives someone would need to privately back up what probably amounts to a fair portion of humanity's media history.

Robert Ewing:
Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

Carpathia is an American company which drops all of their assets under the American government. So no they didn't world police them. Carpathias data centers if you go to their site is Ashburn, Virginia; Dulles, Virginia; Harrissonburg, Virginia; Pheonix, Arizona; Los Angeles, California; Toronto, Canada and Amsterdam, Netherlands(This one is only available for people/companies in Europe however).
So yeah they were on American servers.
Nice try though.

Awexsome:

Everyone knows they can't go after individual pirates so go after the ones who make their actions possible by ignoring or cooperating with them. Megaupload, Pirate Bay, ect.

Well they CAN go after individual people take that girl from early 2000 for pirating music.
Or that 92 year old WWII vet who was recently in a new article for pirating something like 300,000 movies and sending them free of charge to soldiers over in Iraq and Afghanistan.
They could go after the single pirates if they can get a big enough case against them. Going after the companies however is a much bigger pay day.
They already tried the scare tactics of going after individual people but that didn't work so now they are going after the companies that are putting it through. Limewire, MegaUpload, Pirate Bay.

BehattedWanderer:

evilneko:

BehattedWanderer:
Wow, that's a lot of data. Though, I imagine there's quite a few repeats in there. I wonder what the size of the unique content is.

Most cloud storage services use de-duplication, and MU being so big, yeah they would've had that going on in full. Probably a much smaller percent of dupes than you might imagine.

True, but I'm more interested in knowing how many terabyte hard drives someone would need to privately back up what probably amounts to a fair portion of humanity's media history.

1 tera drives? 25 mill divided by 1000.

25,000.

Krion_Vark:

Robert Ewing:
Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

Carpathia is an American company which drops all of their assets under the American government. So no they didn't world police them. Carpathias data centers if you go to their site is Ashburn, Virginia; Dulles, Virginia; Harrissonburg, Virginia; Pheonix, Arizona; Los Angeles, California; Toronto, Canada and Amsterdam, Netherlands(This one is only available for people/companies in Europe however).
So yeah they were on American servers.
Nice try though.

Awexsome:

Everyone knows they can't go after individual pirates so go after the ones who make their actions possible by ignoring or cooperating with them. Megaupload, Pirate Bay, ect.

Well they CAN go after individual people take that girl from early 2000 for pirating music.
Or that 92 year old WWII vet who was recently in a new article for pirating something like 300,000 movies and sending them free of charge to soldiers over in Iraq and Afghanistan.
They could go after the single pirates if they can get a big enough case against them. Going after the companies however is a much bigger pay day.
They already tried the scare tactics of going after individual people but that didn't work so now they are going after the companies that are putting it through. Limewire, MegaUpload, Pirate Bay.

Umm, neither MegaUpload nor The Pirate Bay really did anything "illegal" though. The Pirate Bay doesn't host any copyrighted content themselves, they just hosted *.torrent-files other people uploaded. Now they're not even doing that anymore, all that's on their site are magnet links, that are basically Text-Strings and look like this: magnet:?xt=urn:sha1:YNCKHTQCWBTRNJIV4WNAE52SJUQCZO5C

Especially the MegaUpload case is fucked up beyond belief. They were a file hosting provider doing just that and they were compliant with removing infringing content via the DMCA, they even gave tools to the respective companies to do so.

A few things:
They were working on an IPO/going public right when the whole thing went down: http://news.yahoo.com/megaupload-working-ipo-prior-shutdown-165019136.html

Kim Schmitz already got a lot of his assets and his car back, because the seizure was not legitimate: http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/04/megauploads-dotcom-gets-money-and-mercedes-back-involved-in-political-scandal/

The MPAA/RIAA were also going for other providers and other big companies like Google already took interest in the cases and are defending them (like HotFile): http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/19/google-steps-in-to-defend-hotfile-from-overbroad-and-ill-conceived-mpaa-lawsuit/

The brief is a bit jargon-y and full of footnotes and precedent, as legal documents often are, but the gist is perhaps best summed up by Google itself:

The DMCA requires plaintiffs to show that the service provider failed to act on knowledge of specific infringing material and puts responsibility for policing online infringement [primarily] on copyright owners.

("primary" was printed, but "primarily" is clearly intended)

Google takes a sort of hard-line approach via the DMCA, telling the court that however the MPAA may try to mislead them, Hotfile is in fact protected under safe harbor provisions. And furthermore, Google suggests that the MPAA's approach is contrary to the language in and precedents surrounding the DMCA. The onus is on copyright holders to alert a service to the nature and location of an infringement, and the service's responsibility is to alert the user if possible and remove the material within a reasonable period of time.

Various examples of Hotfile and others allegedly not complying fully (e.g. removing one link to infringing material and not removing the file or alternative links) also get the whip. Why, they ask, should a file-hosting service do more than is asked of them by the law? They are complying with the letter of the law promptly and willingly, and if there are still infringing files being traded, it is up to the copyright holders to report them.

Not only did the US government wrongfully initiate the whole thing, but now they're even:

Trying to deny MegaUpload a fair legal representation: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/04/government-trying-to-deny-megaupload-legal-representation/

The United States government has adopted a take-no-prisoners attitude in its prosecution of Megaupload, seeming to raise every conceivable objection to Megaupload's efforts to defend itself. We've already covered the government's attempts to block Megaupload from spending money to preserve servers that the company says contains data needed for its defense.

Now, the government has adopted a new tactic: making it as difficult as possible for Megaupload to obtain legal counsel. The prominent law firm of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart and Sullivan has sought permission to represent Megaupload in the case. But in a legal document filed on Wednesday, the government raised several objections to freeing up money to allow the law firm to represent Megaupload in court.

There was a great response from their lawyer to that: http://abovethelaw.com/2012/04/quinn-emanuel-calls-b-s-on-government-conflict-of-interest-objection-in-megaupload-case/2/

[I]f the Government is to have its way in this case, the only lawyers before the Court will be those representing the Government. If the Government is to have its way, the only evidence available to the Court would be that cherry-picked by the Government, for the Government, from the universe of relevant servers slated to be wiped. If the Government is to have its way, in sum, Megaupload will never get its day in Court and the case will effectively be over before it has even begun.
...
[I]t knows that no such counsel would realistically be willing to litigate this case through to trial for free or without sufficient resources - or that any such counsel, even if willing, would have litigated at least a prior copyright dispute or two involving a work or a client somehow implicated within the ocean of ESI stored by Megaupload, which the Government would then claim is itself disqualifying. Knowing all this, the Government appears unwilling to litigate fair and square. Instead, it is acting to vitiate Megaupload's defense before the merits are ever reached.
...
The Government contends that Quinn Emanuel should not be allowed to enter a limited appearance "until all potential conflict situations are resolved," maintaining that Megaupload infringed copyrights owned by other Quinn Emanuel clients and citing concern that Megaupload would not be receiving "constitutionally sufficient representation." Government Opposition at 9. The cited concern should be no concern at all, for the conflicts conjured by the Government are fanciful and Megaupload and Mr. Dotcom have, in any event, agreed to waive them. Moreover, the undersigned assure this Court that Quinn Emanuel has carefully considered its ethical obligations in this case, as it always does, and is satisfied that it can properly proceed with this representation consistent with those obligations.
...
As a preliminary matter, the Government's putative basis for disqualifying Quinn Emanuel would stand to disqualify essentially any law firm equipped to litigate one of "the largest criminal copyright cases ever brought by the United States."...
As Carpathia, a third party, has noted, "Twenty-five petabytes is equal to approximately half of all the entire written works of mankind, from the beginning of recorded history, in all languages."...
Any law firm that knows its way around intellectual property litigation will presumably have handled a case involving a client or work that can be spotted somewhere amidst the sprawling electronic repository. Of course, only the Government has had meaningful opportunity to scour the relevant servers, and only the Government knows precisely what is in its resulting discovery files. This leaves the Government positioned to play "Gotcha" with any firm that may step up to make an appearance.

As if that wouldn't have been enough, a judge involved in the case argued that it may never happen:
http://torrentfreak.com/megaupload-trial-may-never-happen-judge-says-120420/
http://abovethelaw.com/2012/04/megaupload-trial-may-never-happen-because-the-fbi-apparently-doesnt-understand-extradition-rules/

It turns out that the US judge handling the case has serious doubts whether it will ever go to trial due to a procedural error.

"I frankly don't know that we are ever going to have a trial in this matter," Judge O'Grady said as reported by the NZ Herald.

Judge O'Grady informed the FBI that Megaupload was never served with criminal charges, which is a requirement to start the trial. The origin of this problem is not merely a matter of oversight. Megaupload's lawyer Ira Rothken says that unlike people, companies can't be served outside US jurisdiction.

"My understanding as to why they haven't done that is because they can't. We don't believe Megaupload can be served in a criminal matter because it is not located within the jurisdiction of the United States," Rothken says.

Megaupload's lawyer adds that he doesn't understand why the US authorities weren't aware of this problem before. As a result Judge O'Grady noted that Megaupload is "kind of hanging out there."

Basically, this entire thing looks more and more like a big old farce initiated by the Copyright MAFIAA

evilneko:
That just ain't right. The government should either image the hard drives (ie what they normally do in computer crime cases) and release the originals back to Carpathia, or drop the case. In other words: shit or get off the potservers.

No I don't care that that would require tens of thousands of fresh hard drives and possibly cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Their footdragging has already cost Carpathia well over a million dollars.

Actually, Im sure that it is illegal to force a company to lose money while citing legal issues such as evidence in the United States when it comes down to it.

If I was in charge of Carpathia I would give an ultimatum: You want your fucking evidence? you help keep it online or we will use OUR fucking servers how we see fit.

America might try to be the big brother of the rest of the world, but it has a hard on for businesses being affected by 'Big Government'.

Just watch, this close to election season you might see this come up.

Kalezian:

evilneko:
That just ain't right. The government should either image the hard drives (ie what they normally do in computer crime cases) and release the originals back to Carpathia, or drop the case. In other words: shit or get off the potservers.

No I don't care that that would require tens of thousands of fresh hard drives and possibly cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Their footdragging has already cost Carpathia well over a million dollars.

Actually, Im sure that it is illegal to force a company to lose money while citing legal issues such as evidence in the United States when it comes down to it.

Doubtful. Evidence can be seized regardless of the effect it has on a business. It's up to the business to seek recompense from the other party.

If MegaUpload was going to take things overseas, it doesn't necessarily require getting the files back to do so...sure it would be a hassle setting things up again, but you don't see all of the other file sharing websites having that much trouble.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/03/19/judge-megaupload-founders-property-seized-with-bogus-warrant/

The warrant used to start all this crap was shown to be in error so why do they still have it?

Robert Ewing:
Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

Really, when it comes to cybercrime, American police are the only police. Not many other countries are willing to devote resources to catching criminals they're barely aware of.

Kalezian:
Actually, Im sure that it is illegal to force a company to lose money while citing legal issues such as evidence in the United States when it comes down to it.

The government is not responsible for any losses incurred by the company if the company was informed it was involved in an illegal act and failed to stop. If we are to believe the article that is what happened.

If I was in charge of Carpathia I would give an ultimatum: You want your fucking evidence? you help keep it online or we will use OUR fucking servers how we see fit.

You enjoy your counts of "obstruction of justice" in a federal case (making them felonies).

>18 USC § 1509 - Obstruction of court orders

Whoever, by threats or force, willfully prevents, obstructs, impedes, or interferes with, or willfully attempts to prevent, obstruct, impede, or interfere with, the due exercise of rights or the performance of duties under any order, judgment, or decree of a court of the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both

>18 USC § 1519 - Destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in Federal investigations and bankruptcy

Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object with the intent to impede, obstruct, or influence the investigation or proper administration of any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States or any case filed under title 11, or in relation to or contemplation of any such matter or case, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both.

Yea, you would get up to 21 years in a federal penitentiary and/or whatever the combined fines would be. Still think that is a good move?

America might try to be the big brother of the rest of the world, but it has a hard on for businesses being affected by 'Big Government'.

First, Carpathia is an American business. Second, only when the businesses are doing something illegal.

i gotta say MPAA is insane..... 20 pedabytes of porn is on megaupload and thats just a low assumption i mean comeon admit it it was mainly used for porn and music doenst take much space. and a good majority of the content is not even from the US since it ran in multiple countrys so to uthe files for a lawsuit well thatll be interesting

James Joseph Emerald:

Robert Ewing:
Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

Really, when it comes to cybercrime, American police are the only police. Not many other countries are willing to devote resources to catching criminals they're barely aware of.

look at japan for another they arrest alot of people for uploading one piece

It's like someone was telling me before.

If the Government was able to do this already, why did they even need SOPA?

ALL OF THIS could have been avoided if they just went through official channels before the seizure. They should have sent a court order to the owner of MegaUpload to delete the illegal data. It would save them ALL a lot of time and money. But no, America has to stick it's violent neanderthal dick in everybody's business without thinking things through. They think they can fix everything with violence and display of power. That never works. Which they should know because they've been doing it for years without any results.
You know, Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results. Which is exactly what American government is doing. That's what happens when a bunch of old men with 2 digit IQ's are running the entire country. How fuckin' sad and terrifying is that?

Lugbzurg:
It's like someone was telling me before.

If the Government was able to do this already, why did they even need SOPA?

SOPA would be closer to E-RAPE rather than just shitting on a website, Sure glad they haven't noticed the several other hosting websites I use.

God the government are dumb.

Gamegodtre:

James Joseph Emerald:

Robert Ewing:
Well, Megaupload wasn't on any American servers, the owners weren't American. It had very little to do with America is my point, but they were the ones that world policed the fuck out of them, and took it down. I think they should pick up the relatively small slack on protecting the legal files uploaded to be honest.

Really, when it comes to cybercrime, American police are the only police. Not many other countries are willing to devote resources to catching criminals they're barely aware of.

look at japan for another they arrest alot of people for uploading one piece

Germany too. But Cybercrime is international by nature, and as such there needs to be an international police presence to deal with it effectively. The FBI undoubtedly have the most experience, so I don't see the problem with them taking the lead. It's a different circumstance than the "America: World Police" mentality of military invasions done "for their own good."

Sounds like the government "Oh we shut them down. We're not sure why and don't have the time to actually get evidence, but we shut them down cause we can." Trust your government folks, they know what's best.

Sarge034:

Kalezian:
Actually, Im sure that it is illegal to force a company to lose money while citing legal issues such as evidence in the United States when it comes down to it.

The government is not responsible for any losses incurred by the company if the company was informed it was involved in an illegal act and failed to stop. If we are to believe the article that is what happened.

If I was in charge of Carpathia I would give an ultimatum: You want your fucking evidence? you help keep it online or we will use OUR fucking servers how we see fit.

You enjoy your counts of "obstruction of justice" in a federal case (making them felonies).

>18 USC § 1509 - Obstruction of court orders

Whoever, by threats or force, willfully prevents, obstructs, impedes, or interferes with, or willfully attempts to prevent, obstruct, impede, or interfere with, the due exercise of rights or the performance of duties under any order, judgment, or decree of a court of the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both

>18 USC § 1519 - Destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in Federal investigations and bankruptcy

Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object with the intent to impede, obstruct, or influence the investigation or proper administration of any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States or any case filed under title 11, or in relation to or contemplation of any such matter or case, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both.

Yea, you would get up to 21 years in a federal penitentiary and/or whatever the combined fines would be. Still think that is a good move?

America might try to be the big brother of the rest of the world, but it has a hard on for businesses being affected by 'Big Government'.

First, Carpathia is an American business. Second, only when the businesses are doing something illegal.

I'm guessing you would vote yes to SOPA, ACTA, and that nice part of the NDAA that allowed for indefinite detainment of US citizens without cause or charge. I find your post especially amusing since the prosecutor himself said they don't have the time to substantiate the infringement claims, they're just assuming they're all true and everyone else can go f themselves.

is willingly holding illegal content a crime? If yes, megaupload are criminals. Even if they did host legal stuff, they would still be criminals. Am I saying I am any better? No! However as a business you need to keep legal all the time, Look at YouTube. There is a lot of copywrited material on it. However they try to limit it as much as possible.

Piracy is a crime, as much as I love free stuff. People need to be payed. Which is why the US Government should pay for the servers.

Sylveria:

I'm guessing you would vote yes to SOPA, ACTA, and that nice part of the NDAA that allowed for indefinite detainment of US citizens without cause or charge. I find your post especially amusing since the prosecutor himself said they don't have the time to substantiate the infringement claims, they're just assuming they're all true and everyone else can go f themselves.

Baseless conjectures made about someone who challenged the notion of breaking the law.
Classy dude, really classy.

"He knows the law! Therefore he must support SOPA", nice.

No, as of right now, they are held under court, any messing with the data IS obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence. The government would LOVE for them to do something drastic to make them look like criminals and get the world on their side.
Until the government goes, "yeah, we fucked up" and backs down, that will be the case. And they will go, "yeah, we fucked up" and back down. The backlash would be immense otherwise.
For now they just have to take the injustice, display their indignation, appeal to the government, and the law, and wait for it to stop. When it comes to the government you have to play by the rules, even if they don't. Especially when they don't, because that's when you get to hurt them and set precedence. This will actually help set the standard for seizing data cracking on piracy web sites.

Before you go insulting people for knowing the law, make sure your own affairs are in order.

Similar file sites have simply disabled sharing, which permits the original uploaders of the data to download their data, just not anyone else. If they did this with megaupload, anyone with legitimate interests in the site could retrieve their data and the threat of piracy would still be stopped.

isn't this kind of like storing the critical evidence in the house of the theif?

probably the best bet for the server host is to power down the farm and at least reduce the cost, might be worth pulling the slides and just storing them so the data is still there just not easily accessible.

its not obstruction as it would be comparatively easy to access any one slide, and they don't know when the data will be cleared or released

Adam Jensen:
ALL OF THIS could have been avoided if they just went through official channels before the seizure. They should have sent a court order to the owner of MegaUpload to delete the illegal data. It would save them ALL a lot of time and money. But no, America has to stick it's violent neanderthal dick in everybody's business without thinking things through. They think they can fix everything with violence and display of power. That never works. Which they should know because they've been doing it for years without any results.
You know, Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results. Which is exactly what American government is doing. That's what happens when a bunch of old men with 2 digit IQ's are running the entire country. How fuckin' sad and terrifying is that?

The thing is, MegaUpload DID delete illegal content, it's just that they didn't have huge numbers of people working for them so they couldn't delete it all.

It's like arresting the owners of a storage facility because someone has something illegal in one of the lockers, oh right, that doesn't happen because it's fucking stupid to arrest someone for someone else's crimes.

So, translation: The Feds shot their wad off too soon as they have many times before. Read about Waco and other ATF and FBI blunders. The list isn't short.
If there is someone that should be footing the bill, it would be those making the larger complaints that lead to the takedown of MU: the MPAA and RIAA. They can afford it.

Sylveria:
I'm guessing you would vote yes to SOPA,

The only problem I had with SOPA was the ability for private businesses to block anything they wanted. I can say this confidently because I read the legislation, did you? So to answer the question I would vote no unless that section was omitted and then I would vote yes.

ACTA,

The only thing I know about ACTA is that it allows for easier prosecution of copyright law violators in friendly countries. I am ok with this.

and that nice part of the NDAA that allowed for indefinite detainment of US citizens without cause or charge.

Depends on the situation, but not in most cases.

I find your post especially amusing since the prosecutor himself said they don't have the time to substantiate the infringement claims, they're just assuming they're all true and everyone else can go f themselves.

No, the prosecutor said they don't have time to sift through the files to find the individual infringers. And yes this is basically a case of "we told you to stop this shit and you didn't. Now you can deal with the financial fallout of our investigation." And I'm ok with this.

This is going to become a HUGE problem in he infomation age; the sheer amount of infomation.

LastGreatBlasphemer:

Sylveria:

I'm guessing you would vote yes to SOPA, ACTA, and that nice part of the NDAA that allowed for indefinite detainment of US citizens without cause or charge. I find your post especially amusing since the prosecutor himself said they don't have the time to substantiate the infringement claims, they're just assuming they're all true and everyone else can go f themselves.

Baseless conjectures made about someone who challenged the notion of breaking the law.
Classy dude, really classy.

"He knows the law! Therefore he must support SOPA", nice.

No, as of right now, they are held under court, any messing with the data IS obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence. The government would LOVE for them to do something drastic to make them look like criminals and get the world on their side.
Until the government goes, "yeah, we fucked up" and backs down, that will be the case. And they will go, "yeah, we fucked up" and back down. The backlash would be immense otherwise.
For now they just have to take the injustice, display their indignation, appeal to the government, and the law, and wait for it to stop. When it comes to the government you have to play by the rules, even if they don't. Especially when they don't, because that's when you get to hurt them and set precedence. This will actually help set the standard for seizing data cracking on piracy web sites.

Before you go insulting people for knowing the law, make sure your own affairs are in order.

I like you, you actually think these things through. I am conservative by nature, so people assume that I liked the Patriot Act. But the Patriot Act is probably the worst violation of the US constitution to date (though some states are working on worse laws, they are bad for different reasons). Though I still know what is in the law, because I am paranoid by nature, as well. So I knew what that senator just found out.

OT: can anyone really comprehend the true vastness of the data we are talking about. 330 some odd years of video!!! It would take a about 1000 people watching for 3 months strait, not mention the support personnel too care for that army.

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