Twitter 1.1 Clamps Down on Third Party Apps

Twitter 1.1 Clamps Down on Third Party Apps

image

Twitter announced new Rules of the Road, which may herald a monetized sea change for social networking.

In a blog post, Twitter director of consumer products Michael Sippey outlined a series of changes that will eventually make up version 1.1 of the social networking application. Among them are significant changes for third party developers, and some affected developers claim that this means that Twitter intends to keep its monetizing options open. The fewer third parties there are occupying the space, the argument goes, the more opportunities there are for Twitter to make money.

The Rules of the Road are guidelines for developers, telling them what they can and cannot do with Twitter. If a developer disobeys the rules, their Development Key is revoked. The three major changes announced in Sippey's blog post are: display guidelines, previously just suggestions, are now requirements. Pre-installed client applications must be certified by Twitter before release. Finally, Twitter's putting a cap on the user base, and applications will not be able to exceed that cap without express permission from Twitter.

The display requirements are intended to create a uniform experience for Twitter users. "If your application displays Tweets to users," says Sippey, "and it doesn't adhere to our Display Requirements, we reserve the right to revoke your application key." Any apps that are pre-installed on chips, SIM cards and the like must be certified by Twitter first, a requirement that will tend to slow or even prevent third party apps from being circulated. Again, according to Sippey this is being done to ensure a uniform Twitter user experience, and if "you ship an application pre-installed without it being certified by Twitter, we reserve the right to revoke your application key." Finally, third party apps are capped at 100,000 users and cannot have more without express permission from Twitter. Existing apps which already have in excess of 100,000 users are permitted to keep their users, so long as the app user base never exceeds 200% of its current total.

Third party developers are concerned at what this may mean for the future of Twitter. Tom Scott, developer of Klouchebag, claims this is part of a strategy designed to "squeeze out" third party developers, leaving the way clear for Twitter to monetize its social network. According to Scott, Twitter is looking at its user base and seeing where profits can be made. Money comes from promoted Tweets and topics, so Twitter is tailoring its service to those who they see as their core audience. The less outside chatter on the network, the easier it is for Twitter to monetize its preferred promotion-guzzling customer base. Says Scott, "Twitter's decision makes fine business sense but, frankly, it's rude."

Source: Guardian, Klouchebag

Permalink

Poor Third party developers, Now all the in house programers are going to make fun of their tiny caps.
image

I remember when Twitter was the hot new thing that was a free and awesome alternative to current social networking.
Now it's turning into every other social network ever.

Twitter now = Facebook 2.0 Lite Edition.
What happened to you Twitter?

GenGenners:
I remember when Twitter was the hot new thing that was a free and awesome alternative to current social networking.
Now it's turning into every other social network ever.

Twitter now = Facebook 2.0 Lite Edition.
What happened to you Twitter?

MSN did it. Myspace did it. Facebook did it. Twitter is doing it.

These fads come and go. I'm interested to see what becomes the next "it."

Karloff:
..."If your application displays Tweets to users," says Sippey, "and it doesn't adhere to our Display Requirements, we reserve the right to revoke your application key." [ ... ] Again, according to Sippey this is being done to ensure a uniform Twitter user experience...

It's text. It's 140 characters of TEXT!! Sent via SMS! You don't control presentation; you never did!

Money comes from promoted Tweets and topics, so Twitter is tailoring its service to those who they see as their core audience. The less outside chatter on the network, the easier it is for Twitter to monetize its preferred promotion-guzzling customer base.

Ah, yes, the promotion-guzzling customer base, who must number in the dozens.

Dear Lord, what complete idiots. It's manifestly apparent that Twitter has no clue how or why people use the service. If you want to see a modern take on the Golden Goose fable, it looks like Twitter is going to write it.

I would be less pissed off at this if there were an available program that had an appreciable fraction of the features the pre-buyout Tweetdeck did. I'm still using the old 0.38.2 version because the current version is a steaming pile of crap.

And seriously, a 100000 user cap per third party app? What the christ are they thinking? Talk about killing innovation.

Well, fuck. I use a smaller Twitter app for my phone, an older phone not supported much by anyone. Well, at least I know that the developer is a good guy who supports his apps, so he'll probably update it.

The thing I have more of an issue with is the user cap. Twitter is used by millions of people, an user cap (especially one so ridiculously low) is going to be bad for all of those people who use twitter from smartphones and stuff.

ewhac:

Dear Lord, what complete idiots. It's manifestly apparent that Twitter has no clue how or why people use the service. If you want to see a modern take on the Golden Goose fable, it looks like Twitter is going to write it.

It's a golden goose probably producing nothing but air as it is.

Now, if they were cutting into the profitability of Twitter, things would be different. This will damage their user base, but it's somewhat doubtful the users of third party Twitter applications are a major source of income right now.

Like it or not, companies tend to prioritize making money over customer experience.

I'm pretty glad I never got on the Twitter bus, especially now. And seriously, how the hell are they supposed to control the user base of any app? The number of users is the number of users, not much Twitter or the developer can do to affect that. That's like the city telling me that I can have my sidewalk as long as no more than 20 people a day walk on it. Asinine.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here