RetroN 5 Console Revives NES And SNES-Era Classics

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RetroN 5 Console Revives NES And SNES-Era Classics

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The console is capable of playing NES, SNES, Sega Genesis, Game Boy Advance and Famicom cartridges of both PAL and NTSC format.

Love playing retro games from the NES and SNES-era, but are sick of having all those consoles clutter up your living room? Or maybe your new-fangled HDTV is struggling to deal with the decades-old machines? Hyperkin has you covered, announcing the RetroN 5 retro-gaming console. The console can play games designed for the NES, SNES, Sega Genesis, Game Boy Advance and Famicom (Japanese NES). It can play games from both PAL and NTSC regions, and supports HDMI output with up to 720p resolution.

Just as the GBA supported Game Boy Color and Game Boy games, and the Genesis supported Sega Mega Drive games, so to will the RetroN 5. Super Famicom (Japanese SNES) games will also work in the SNES slot. This means the console can play games from nine different systems. The Famicom slot is the latest addition to Hyperkin's line of RetroN consoles, with the company stating that "we found that we could incorporate one more cartridge slot without hindering our current developmental cycle."

Six controller slots line the sides of the console, supporting controllers from the NES, SNES and Genesis. As well as being able to use any controller for any system (for example, you can use a SNES controller to play Genesis games), the RetroN 5 comes with its own unique wireless controller. The new controller has a Microswitch Directional Pad instead of a traditional directional pad.

The console also supports save states for games of every system. This means that you can save your game at any point in time by accessing the console's main menu. The console also autosaves your progress whenever you shut it down.

Hyperkin says that the RetroN 5 does a great job of tidying up the sounds and visuals of the games it plays. It supports both standard 4:3 and widescreen 16:9 aspect ratios, and makes use of audio interpolation for a smoother, cleaner audio output.

Hyperkin has offered no news of when the new console will launch, or how much it will cost.

Source: Hyperkin

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Is this the one Checkpoint jokes about a week or two ago?

The features actually seem fairly nice, though I'm not sure I care enough about retro gaming to have one.

An emulator in a box, basically. I suppose it isn't surprising someone would finally get around to doing this.

This is a very cool idea. Now if only the cartridges themselves didn't have a lifespan. I think you can replace the batteries in some of them, but I don't know if that will save some of my old NES games. Maybe the cartridges could be re-released in some way...?

This sounds great but I would probably end up getting it specifically to play the few Famicom games I've grabbed...and as a placeholder until I can get my hands on a GBA player for my gamecube. I'll have to keep an eye on this bad boy.

Lord_Jaroh:
This is a very cool idea. Now if only the cartridges themselves didn't have a lifespan. I think you can replace the batteries in some of them, but I don't know if that will save some of my old NES games. Maybe the cartridges could be re-released in some way...?

Oh man I know what you mean. I've got old Gameboy Games that date back to ancient times and I've got no clue if they even have a charge anymore. A lot of companies are re-releasing the classics anyway on different platforms (The 3ds has been getting all the classic megaman titles), but there are lesser known ones like Final Fantasy Legends that just aren't getting re-released, and were actually pretty fun games.

Now maybe I'll have a chance to make up for lost time.

This seems cool, maybe I can finally replay some of my old stuff. So, the thing about it supporting save states, would that mean that it can play cartridges where the internal battery has died? Or does that mean that the cartridge is unplayable as well as losing its save states? No matter, might be worth changing that battery for this thing.

Well that is nice and all but who is paying for all those licenses?
Emulators get away with it because it's under the table stuff but the moment you make commercial products these companies will be chewing your ass.

whenever i hooked up my older consoles to my pc or just emulated one of those many consoles on the pc straight away and played old games on it for hours i always, and i mean ALWAYS kept wondering if there would be a way to throw all that stinking and exessive money i have lying around on something that i already have and works perfectly, but isnt as open as my pc.

fucking awesome!

Clive Howlitzer:
An emulator in a box, basically. I suppose it isn't surprising someone would finally get around to doing this.

We are talking about Hyperkin, a company that took a hex editor, threw it into an orange USB stick, and called it a "Game Genie".

You can purchase this hex editor for the low, low price of $30.

Did I mention the orange 1GB USB stick?

Lord_Jaroh:
This is a very cool idea. Now if only the cartridges themselves didn't have a lifespan. I think you can replace the batteries in some of them, but I don't know if that will save some of my old NES games. Maybe the cartridges could be re-released in some way...?

If you used the old front loading NES the problem is that that bent the pins on the carts, you can get those repaired and cleaned though, I think retroware.tv ran a series of articles and videos about cartridge repair and cleaning a while back if you're interested. Might be an idea.

The batteries are just used to store save data aren't they~? Pretty easy to replace iirc and a lot of my Mega Drive games batteries still live to this day.

How does it work? To smoothly emulate with perfect accuracy on the snes you need like a decent ivy bridge i5 or better so what exactly is it doing instead? Got little shrunk down consoles in there so it doesn't need to emulate? Just using an inaccurate emulator on an ARM pc?

It is cool. If it comes with optional controllers that look like the controller the various systems that you can play the games of on this thing it will be perfect.

edit - never mind I have just learnt that it comes with controller ports. I will be slightly embarrassed if I see that in the original article later

further edit - yes the original article does say that, that is embarrassing

Now we just need some halfway decent third party controllers.

I've yet to find anything that feels as good as the first party SNES controllers.

Clive Howlitzer:
An emulator in a box, basically. I suppose it isn't surprising someone would finally get around to doing this.

You know it's not a new thing, they've had older models (such as the Retron 3).

Also, "...the Genesis supported Sega Mega Drive games...", yes it did, because they were the same damn console...

Sounds great, but if it uses the actual cartridges I have to wonder how it manages to pull all that off.

This does look interesting, being the all in one gaming system. Of course you could always do all of this with emulators now, but nobody would recommend such questionable legal tactics would they?

If it's not to expensive, I might have to pick one of these up. I still have some GBA games laying around, and you can always find old game cartridges for sale online and at flea markets/yard sales...

cidbahamut:
Now we just need some halfway decent third party controllers.

I've yet to find anything that feels as good as the first party SNES controllers.

Actually, I'm pretty sure you can just plug in your old SNES controllers.

I have a Retron 4 and love the thing, if only because it helped clear a lot of space on my shelf by allowing me to put three old consoles into storage.

The battery pack issue is a problem, though. I mostly focus on buying old side scrollers and other games where save features aren't present. I.e. the first game I picked up after getting my Retron 4 was the Genesis X-Men game. So much fun!

Oh man, it's almost worth buying it just to be able to play all of my old GameBoy-games again...

Guess I'll wait for the price tag before I make up my mind.

I don't see what the big deal is. You can get the same result by plugging a PC running an emulator to a TV - Which is what this thing basically is.

Damn, no Sega CD or 32x.

I would love to have one of these! However there is a problem with the fact that if you don't already have the games for it then you are pretty much screwed as nowhere sells games apart from ebay and the like, as well as those who already have the games for this probably already have the consoles to play them on.

We really need to figure out if the console's save state feature will allow us to bypass dead batteries in carts. If that is the case I'll probably buy two of these (collector). If the console also has a USB port so I can store my savefiles elsewhere then that'd be fantastic. I'd assume there should be a USB port since it has to have some sort of storage for the save states. Who knows, guess it's time for some research.

Christ has no one on this site every seen one of these before? There are DOZENS of the exact same think made by a ton of manufacturers. It's not an emulator so don't worry about processing power. It uses a clone hardware so it plays the games "natively". However that means they usually don't play all games. Dragon Warrior 2-4, Starfox, and Yoshi Island are famous for not working on these clone consoles.

Also the only reason a GBA played GB/C games was because it had a gameboy processor on the motherboard. That's why the DS didn't play GB/C because it only had a GBA processor. So if the info sheet says it only plays GBA I would go with it only plays GBA. The article needs to be updated to reflect this.

night_chrono:
Christ has no one on this site every seen one of these before? There are DOZENS of the exact same think made by a ton of manufacturers. It's not an emulator so don't worry about processing power. It uses a clone hardware so it plays the games "natively". However that means they usually don't play all games. Dragon Warrior 2-4, Starfox, and Yoshi Island are famous for not working on these clone consoles.

Also the only reason a GBA played GB/C games was because it had a gameboy processor on the motherboard. That's why the DS didn't play GB/C because it only had a GBA processor. So if the info sheet says it only plays GBA I would go with it only plays GBA. The article needs to be updated to reflect this.

Hi there! The info sheet indeed says that it can play GB/C games, so the article will stand as-is. Thanks for your input! A quick quote about compatibility for your information:

"CIC lockout chips and FX chips are no longer going to be an issue, as we aim to achieve 100% compatibility with all cartridges."

Doom972:
I don't see what the big deal is. You can get the same result by plugging a PC running an emulator to a TV - Which is what this thing basically is.

I believe the big draw of this console is that it actually plays the original game cartridges, something that you can't do on a PC (On a PC you have to download ROMs, which are "illegal")

Steven Bogos:

Doom972:
I don't see what the big deal is. You can get the same result by plugging a PC running an emulator to a TV - Which is what this thing basically is.

I believe the big draw of this console is that it actually plays the original game cartridges, something that you can't do on a PC (On a PC you have to download ROMs, which are "illegal")

Cartridge readers for the PC have existed for a long time now. That's how those ROM files came to be in the first place. I guess I can see your point regardless - most people won't hear about these unless they actively search for information about emulation.

Mr.K.:
Well that is nice and all but who is paying for all those licenses?
Emulators get away with it because it's under the table stuff but the moment you make commercial products these companies will be chewing your ass.

It's called abandoned hardware for a reason. Nintendo and Sega no longer care about consoles they have in production because it's of no lose in profit to them. All of these retrocon consoles are allowing you do is play physical copies of games you still own on a newer piece of hardware, that's it. If sega & nintendo really did care they would have done something about this a-long time go when console clones where hitting the market in the early to mid 2000's

StewShearer:

cidbahamut:
Now we just need some halfway decent third party controllers.

I've yet to find anything that feels as good as the first party SNES controllers.

Actually, I'm pretty sure you can just plug in your old SNES controllers.

After twenty years they're finally starting to show their age and it's difficult to find replacements.

Steven Bogos:

Hi there! The info sheet indeed says that it can play GB/C games, so the article will stand as-is. Thanks for your input! A quick quote about compatibility for your information:

"CIC lockout chips and FX chips are no longer going to be an issue, as we aim to achieve 100% compatibility with all cartridges."

Yea I read their spec sheet. The article should be changed though because the GBA hardware was not what allowed the playing of GB/C games. It is factually incorrect how it is currently worded.

Mr.K.:
Well that is nice and all but who is paying for all those licenses?
Emulators get away with it because it's under the table stuff but the moment you make commercial products these companies will be chewing your ass.

Not needed. It is cloning the hardware which can be legally copied using this technique:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clean_room_design

Baneat:
How does it work? To smoothly emulate with perfect accuracy on the snes you need like a decent ivy bridge i5 or better so what exactly is it doing instead? Got little shrunk down consoles in there so it doesn't need to emulate? Just using an inaccurate emulator on an ARM pc?

I'm sorry but are you high? Near perfect SNES emulation was achieved in the early 2000's. I remember playing Starfox, Yoshi Island, Final Fantasy V, Chrono Trigger and more with no problems on my Pentium 3 machine.

night_chrono:
[

I'm sorry but are you high? Near perfect SNES emulation was achieved in the early 2000's. I remember playing Starfox, Yoshi Island, Final Fantasy V, Chrono Trigger and more with no problems on my Pentium 3 machine.

And which magical emulator did you achieve perfect emulation with on a P3 machine? I sure as hell would like to know how you went ahead of time and grabbed BSNES before it was made and got it to run on something less than an i5 with steady 60. Perfect emulation is new-ish

Wait, the GBA is considered classic now? God I feel old...

night_chrono:
I'm sorry but are you high? Near perfect SNES emulation was achieved in the early 2000's. I remember playing Starfox, Yoshi Island, Final Fantasy V, Chrono Trigger and more with no problems on my Pentium 3 machine.

You played Star Fox at double speed, because no emulator got it right until recently.

P.S. Thanks

SkarKrow:

Lord_Jaroh:
This is a very cool idea. Now if only the cartridges themselves didn't have a lifespan. I think you can replace the batteries in some of them, but I don't know if that will save some of my old NES games. Maybe the cartridges could be re-released in some way...?

If you used the old front loading NES the problem is that that bent the pins on the carts, you can get those repaired and cleaned though, I think retroware.tv ran a series of articles and videos about cartridge repair and cleaning a while back if you're interested. Might be an idea.

The batteries are just used to store save data aren't they~? Pretty easy to replace iirc and a lot of my Mega Drive games batteries still live to this day.

Thanks for the info. I'm gonna have to look into this. :)

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