Sunken City Holds A Wealth Of Archaeological Treasures

Sunken City Holds A Wealth Of Archaeological Treasures

Heracleion statue

Archaeologists have uncovered a treasure trove of historical artifacts in the ancient city of Heracleion, but these items were not found buried underground. Instead, they were resting beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea.

If there's one universal constant we can always rely on, it's that nature doesn't really care about humanity. Sure, we could destroy the ozone layer or nuke the planet to irradiated scrap, but after a few hundred years the world will have continued on without us, gradually erasing all traces that humans ever walked the earth. Case in point: The sunken city of Heracleion.

At the height of Egypt's power, scientists believe that Heracleion (or "Thonis," as the Egyptians called it) served as a port of major importance, situated as it was at the intersection of the Mediterranean and the Nile River. This is supported by the "64 ancient shipwrecks and more than 700 anchors" that archaeologists have recovered from Aboukir Bay, an area that served as the location of Hercleion before the city was buried under a gradual torrent of water, mud and sand. Despite its impressive past, Heracleion currently lies 30 feet below the surface of the Bay.

While the city's current resting place may not be very hospitable to visitors, researchers love that the place sunk into the Sea. "The archaeological evidence is simply overwhelming," states Oxford professor Sir Barry Cunliffe. "By lying untouched and protected by sand on the sea floor for centuries they are brilliantly preserved."

Scientists have been excavating Heracleion since 2000, and in that time they've uncovered a wealth of religious artifacts (including massive limestone statuary), the aforementioned shipwrecks and a number of other objects which offer a glimpse into the city's mysterious past.

So why exactly did Heracleion sink? That's the big mystery here. Some researchers suggest that the weight of the city's buildings, combined with the relatively sandy soil on which the place was built could have served as a perfect recipe for the creation of a sinkhole large enough to swallow Heracleion, particularly following a major geological event like an earthquake.

Despite 13 years of digging, archaeologists feel they still have a long ways to go before they've plumbed all of Heracleion's secrets. ""We are just at the beginning of our research," says Franck Goddio, one of the first people to discover Heracleion, "we will probably have to continue working for the next 200 years for Thonis-Heracleion to be fully revealed and understood."

Source: Huffington Post

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Just curious, but why post this here? Seems a bit out of place even with the sciencey stuff that occasionally shows up. Unless a certain busty, dual-pistol wielding archaeologist was spotted nearby wrestling a shark.

CriticalMiss:
Just curious, but why post this here? Seems a bit out of place even with the sciencey stuff that occasionally shows up. Unless a certain busty, dual-pistol wielding archaeologist was spotted nearby wrestling a shark.

Because its interesting and cool?

OT: This is awesome :D
I can't wait to see what these artifacts could tell us about the city's history and functions!

Still trying to figure out what the fuck I am looking at in that picture =/

DVS BSTrD:
Still trying to figure out what the fuck I am looking at in that picture =/

Something from Rapture?

SpcyhknBC:

DVS BSTrD:
Still trying to figure out what the fuck I am looking at in that picture =/

Something from Rapture?

pretty sure its a Goa'uld...

cause i don't think most ancient egyptian statues have glowing eyes...

Oh great. So at which point will they open the tome that was buried by the sinking of the city to prevent whatever monsterous evil from destroying mankind?

Scientists call it Heracleion, Egyptians called it Thonis, and gamers call it Hyrule. XD

Earnest Cavalli:
So why exactly did Heracleion sink? That's the big mystery here. Some researchers suggest that the weight of the city's buildings, combined with the relatively sandy soil on which the place was built could have served as a perfect recipe for the creation of a sinkhole large enough to swallow Heracleion, particularly following a major geological event like an earthquake.

So basically, don't build your city on a beach?

Captcha: fresh water. Close, but no cigar.

they been digging around for 13 years and now suddenly its news on a gaming news site. i am confused. i can udnerstand the sci-fi stuff because well "technology duh", but archeology and gaming has what in common?

luvd1:
Oh great. So at which point will they open the tome that was buried by the sinking of the city to prevent whatever monsterous evil from destroying mankind?

why's it always mankind ?

why's there never a monstrous evil wants to destroy wormkind of flykind or snakekind or spiderkind ?

i mean flykind surely has it coming...especially in that part of the world...

Well guys, it took awhile but we finally found Atlantis.

erttheking:
Well guys, it took awhile but we finally found Atlantis.

already found that a while ago...probably
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoan_eruption

erttheking:
Well guys, it took awhile but we finally found Atlantis.

The earliest mention of Atlantis was by Plato somewhere around 360 BC. Heracleion sank at some point between 6th-7th century AD. There is small problem with your contention.

albino boo:

erttheking:
Well guys, it took awhile but we finally found Atlantis.

The earliest mention of Atlantis was by Plato somewhere around 360 BC. Heracleion sank at some point between 6th-7th century AD. There is small problem with your contention.

You do know that that was a joke right?

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

 

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