Missing Teenager's Parents Blame "Online Tournaments"

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Missing Teenager's Parents Blame "Online Tournaments"

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The parents of a missing teenager are convinced that someone he met while playing Call of Duty 4 is responsible for his disappearance, and are calling for a more intensive "online search" for their son.

Brandon Crisp of Barrie, Ontario left home nearly two weeks ago after his parents took away his Xbox 360 following an argument over what his parents called his "addiction" to Call of Duty 4. "He's out there now with someone he met online. They're harboring him or he's being held against his will," Steve Crisp, the boy's father, said, adding that it was more likely the latter.

Local police have conducted an extensive search for the youth, but his father called for a greater focus on the online community Brandon had connected with since he began playing the game. "I really need the help of the police now in really delving in and getting right to this Xbox hard drive," he said. While he didn't find fault with the physical search conducted by Barrie police, he said the Ontario Provincial Police or Royal Canadian Mounted Police had the resources needed to carry out a full online investigation.

The O.P.P.'s cyber-crimes unit is attempting to "crack" Brandon's computer and Xbox Live account to identify members of his gaming clan, and Microsoft has said it will suspend its privacy protocol to assist with the investigation, according to Barrie Police Sergeant Dave Goodbrand. ""Brandon's dad made a plea to Microsoft," Goodbrand said. "This is an exigent circumstance, where it's a kid you're searching for. This isn't the same as other criminal investigations, where you're looking for evidence." As well as cooperating with police, Microsoft has also increased a reward for information leading to the boy's return to $50,000.

"He [Brandon] was getting good enough that there's a possibility he was expanding into other clans," Goodbrand added.

Crisp claimed he didn't blame Xbox 360 manufacturer Microsoft for his son's disappearance, saying instead that "online tournaments" were the real problem. His parents were aware that the game was "taking over his life," Crisp admitted, but it wasn't until after the boy ran away that they learned about teams of gamers who play in online tournaments for money. "I wish I'd known before," his father said, because the strict rules of the team environment "gave him a whole new identity." When he took the Xbox away, he said, "Basically, I took away his identity."

Barrie police and hundreds of volunteers have been searching for the boy, focusing on an area in which he had been spotted the day he left home, the last confirmed sighting of the youth. Anyone with knowledge of Brandon Crisp's whereabouts are asked to call the Barrie Police Department at (705) 725-7025.

Source: CBC, Toronto Star

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God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

*ugh..* this again? Can we just shut up about this now? Parent's fault, not gaming's fault, and not the kids. end of story.

Zrahni:
God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

Zrahni, you don't know what you're talking about and you'd be better off not demonstrating that ignorance. There's more to this case than is posted here on the Escapist; I don't think the parents are correct in blaming "tournaments", as I think they have their terminology mixed up, but they *have* been working with their child.

-- Steve

It's the blame culture today. I am surprised however that they admitted to not blaming Microsoft.

buy teh haloz:
*ugh..* this again? Can we just shut up about this now? Parent's fault, not gaming's fault, and not the kids. end of story.

I don't support your stance on halo, but i agree

Anton P. Nym:

Zrahni:
God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

Zrahni, you don't know what you're talking about and you'd be better off not demonstrating that ignorance. There's more to this case than is posted here on the Escapist; I don't think the parents are correct in blaming "tournaments", as I think they have their terminology mixed up, but they *have* been working with their child.

-- Steve

Pretty much always children problems come from parents mistakes even from most minor mistake.
And thats a fact.

Shoulda blamed halo...MEGA BLAME!

I am going on record as saying that the parents, as far as I can tell, are lashing out at the wrong thing, but were still trying to be responsible parents. I swear...parents use videogames as babysitters, get freaked out by violent content, gamers blame the parents. Parents see their kids start taking videogames a little too seriously, tries to cut him back (you know, like responsible parents would), kid runs away, gamers blame the parents. Damned if you do, damned if you don't, I suppose.

While my heart goes out to these people, I'm inclined to agree with the sentiment that they are very wrong in blaming anything involving gaming for their child running off. Fact is, it could have been anything. If he didn't have Xbox, something else would have addicted him, if that's what the problem was. I sincerely do hope they find the boy alive and well, no parents should lose a child like that.

Well, I'm glad that Brandon's dad has been man enough to admit that what he did was an extreme thing, and that he handled it the wrong way. I can see he was trying to protect his son, I guess, but really, his parents went the wrong way about it. Personally, at that age, I was pretty obsessed with games myself. When my parents took all my games away, I made them up! I still had the console, so I put action figures down and moved them and pushed buttons on the controller! I was about as far gone as this kid, if not more. Cold turkey is not the answer, especially if you offer nothing else in its place.

Damn, I never thought I'd admit that to anybody ever.

neoman10:

buy teh haloz:
*ugh..* this again? Can we just shut up about this now? Parent's fault, not gaming's fault, and not the kids. end of story.

I don't support your stance on halo, but i agree

hahahaha i can't tell you how many times I got that remark for my user name xD My username is based off a penny arcade joke.

Zrahni:
God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

People are pathologically afraid of blame. It doesn't justify their actions, in fact, it makes them scumbags, but it explains their motives.

The 'online tournaments' may have been a trigger, but the parents handled the situation very poorly. You force reduced time per day if you feel they're addicted, or you require certain grades and attentiveness at school; if they can accomplish everything else they have to, then the addiction isn't hurting them. Anyone should know you don't just force an addict to go cold-turkey, it's the worst possible method eliciting the most potent response.

buy teh haloz:
*ugh..* this again? Can we just shut up about this now? Parent's fault, not gaming's fault, and not the kids. end of story.

sometimes it is the kid its both their fault but not the games...and some culture is bad for you but in this case no....

One of my friends died a few days ago coming back from the Sharks-Bulls rugby final. The bakkie he was in got hit, and he died. Life goes on, and nobody is cowardly enough to blame the rugby tournament for his death.

buy teh haloz:

neoman10:

buy teh haloz:
*ugh..* this again? Can we just shut up about this now? Parent's fault, not gaming's fault, and not the kids. end of story.

I don't support your stance on halo, but i agree

hahahaha i can't tell you how many times I got that remark for my user name xD My username is based off a penny arcade joke.

ok good

Does anyone else see the irony of most of the responses here?

Parent only interested in justifying their child-raising techniques: "It's not my fault, it's the games!"

Posters only interested in justifying their gaming habits: "It's not the games fault, it's the parents!"

Let's get kind of crazy and suggest it might just be a little bit of both...

xMacx:
Does anyone else see the irony of most of the responses here?

Parent only interested in justifying their child-raising techniques: "It's not my fault, it's the games!"

Posters only interested in justifying their gaming habits: "It's not the games fault, it's the parents!"

Let's get kind of crazy and suggest it might just be a little bit of both...

Parents bought xbox 360 so the kid doesn't annoy them, and they didn't set gaming time from start, so if you sum it up you get parenting flaws.

I'm sorry. This is sad, but honestly.

"Yeah, I been sawin' that kid. He and sum' tall bloke wit' glasses like tha' there 'arry Potter. They be runnin' cross my street, carryin' them playboxes and backpackies. I ask' em bout it, they be tellin' me some trash bout runnin' way to a tourny a sum sort. I gave em' a loaf a' bread and sent em on their way"

I find it really hard to believe they believe he ran away with another gamer to online tournaments. I can see it plausible he was abducted, but I really doubt the 360 had much more to do with it than causing him to run away in angst.

Maybe everyone could stop flapping their arms up and down going 'Oh lawdy, lawdy, won't someone think of da children!' for five minutes?

If he's dead (which is looking more and more likely), this sort of thing is considered an object lesson where I come from.

Zrahni:
God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

Because their two human being who's child has gone missing and maybe dead? Because this is something that I doubt any of us have had to face (in my case, I don't even have kids).

Panicking, worried parents tend to lash out.

Royas:
While my heart goes out to these people, I'm inclined to agree with the sentiment that they are very wrong in blaming anything involving gaming for their child running off. Fact is, it could have been anything. If he didn't have Xbox, something else would have addicted him, if that's what the problem was. I sincerely do hope they find the boy alive and well, no parents should lose a child like that.

Agreed - on all counts.

HalfShadow:
Maybe everyone could stop flapping their arms up and down going 'Oh lawdy, lawdy, won't someone think of da children!' for five minutes?

If he's dead (which is looking more and more likely), this sort of thing is considered an object lesson where I come from.

Which is...?

The kid's like, what 11? I think he just overeacted when his parents did somehting he saw as irrational and just ran away; kids do dumb things.

How do they know he ran away? Did he physically run away within there sight? If so, why didn't they stop him? If not, who's to say he didn't get kidnapped by a pedophile? A Serial Killer? Micheal Jackson?

SinisterDeath:
Micheal Jackson?

He was framed.

Most people are jumping to gaming's defence here when gaming isn't even under attack. It's a couple of desperate parents who have had their kid go missing, and are asking the police to check his online history for evidence because they knew he spent a lot of time on there. Where is the attack on gaming? They weirdly say they "blame tournaments", which shows they don't really even know what they are saying about the subject, but also shows no attack on gaming as such. They're just desperate and trying to help police find evidence.

TheFitcher:
Most people are jumping to gaming's defence here when gaming isn't even under attack. It's a couple of desperate parents who have had their kid go missing, and are asking the police to check his online history for evidence because they knew he spent a lot of time on there. Where is the attack on gaming? They weirdly say they "blame tournaments", which shows they don't really even know what they are saying about the subject, but also shows no attack on gaming as such. They're just desperate and trying to help police find evidence.

actually they are blaming games, sure they are using the wrong terminologies but due to their bad parenting skills, ie not properly punishing him as he grew up, they are now trying to find an excuse as to why their kid would do something like that

there is a better article where the paper doesn't blame games but really this has a lot to do with the parents of the kid

They changed there statement?

parents fault, not gamings fault, not kids fault, not microsofts fault, not anyones freaking fault except for the parents.

Damn these kids with their hippity hops and dancing and their online net tournaments and nnghr..zzzzzz...

Online Tournaments Blame Missing Teenager's "Parents".

I think people are missing the point here.

Its not blame directed at games its directed at clan culture. Thats what they mean about "online tournamnents" "playing for money" and "gave him a whole new identity."

If they were blaming gaming the headline would of been "Ban COD4!!!"

You have to admit that clans take shit way too seriously, only have to look at WoW for instance or EVE where people set alarms to wake up in the middle of the night just to defend imaginary space on the internet. Plus there has been enough real murders because of clan wars that spilled over into real life.

You can't tell me thats a healthy enviroment for a 11 year old.

I am sure that the kid wasn't in Play for money online Tourneys, I think what they are refering to the friendly Clan Vs Clan matches. You cannot honestly blame video games or clans for any of this but the parents have a right to take away the game if the kids is losing slip with reality. It happen to me once when i was playing a Online game, i was losing slip on reality and my parents stepped in. LUCKILY i wasn't 11 and knew why my parents honestly did what they did.

These parents honestly should have just sat down and had a long hard talk about the game rather then taking a 360 away. In a way they have no one to blame but themselves.

Zac_Dai:
You have to admit that clans take shit way too seriously, only have to look at WoW for instance or EVE where people set alarms to wake up in the middle of the night just to defend imaginary space on the internet. Plus there has been enough real murders because of clan wars that spilled over into real life.

I've never heard of a Real murder over clan related matters, if you have a link to a report about this I'd like to read it and i also agree that clans to take video games too seriously but sometimes you have set times on WoW and stuff because everyone needs to organize. Some of it though is just crazy.

SinisterDeath:
How do they know he ran away? Did he physically run away within there sight? If so, why didn't they stop him? If not, who's to say he didn't get kidnapped by a pedophile? A Serial Killer? Micheal Jackson?

In the last report I read, the police stated that when the parents took away the 360, the kid threatened to run away from home if they didn't give it back. They essentially said, "There's the door," and he took it. Not an unusual approach for parents to take, but certainly an unexpected result.

Zrahni:

Anton P. Nym:

Zrahni:
God why can't those parents grow a pair and accept that they didn't spend enough attention and time with there child, instead of trying to blame "online tournaments".

Zrahni, you don't know what you're talking about and you'd be better off not demonstrating that ignorance. There's more to this case than is posted here on the Escapist; I don't think the parents are correct in blaming "tournaments", as I think they have their terminology mixed up, but they *have* been working with their child.

-- Steve

Pretty much always children problems come from parents mistakes even from most minor mistake.
And thats a fact.

If it's a fact, present evidence.

Malygris:

SinisterDeath:
How do they know he ran away? Did he physically run away within there sight? If so, why didn't they stop him? If not, who's to say he didn't get kidnapped by a pedophile? A Serial Killer? Micheal Jackson?

In the last report I read, the police stated that when the parents took away the 360, the kid threatened to run away from home if they didn't give it back. They essentially said, "There's the door," and he took it. Not an unusual approach for parents to take, but certainly an unexpected result.

Usually when kids run away they realize how cold and scary it is out there and return home quickly after. I'm afraid it looks like someone or something has the little guy.

Now that my cynicism has been expended, lets remember the kid is only 11, and both he and his parents are probably scared out of their minds. Lets not be TOO hard on them...

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