Cross Plane Kickstarter Wants Multi-Platform Remote Play

Cross Plane Kickstarter Wants Multi-Platform Remote Play

Cross Plane

The Cross Plane Wireless Video Interface would allow players to remotely play the PS3, Xbox 360, Ouya, PC and, eventually, the Xbox One and PS4.

Arguably one of the niftiest features the PlayStation 4 will boast when it launches is its ability to be remotely played by the Vita. Granted, the PSP could do this with the PS3 and the Wii U also has off-screen functionality. That said, the PSP version wasn't all that good and the Vita's iteration of remote play will be a tad more portable than the Wii U GamePad. That being the case, what if you had a device that could do remote play with more than just one console? Enter the Cross Plane Wireless Video Interface.

The Cross Plane, a product of Advanced Gaming Innovations LLC, would give players the ability to remotely play consoles including the Xbox 360, PS3, Ouya, PCs, and eventually the Xbox One and PS4. Essentially a wireless, high-definition display with buttons built into, players would be able to connect it to the gaming system of their choice. Players interested in multi-platform gaming could switch between gaming machines with swappable "control paks" that would serve as the "brain" of the system.

Hoping to improve on the Cross Plane's current prototype and begin production, AGI, which is headed up by veteran console modder Chris Downing, recently launched a Kickstarter with the hopes of raising $350,000. It's a considerable amount, but one that Downing and company believe to be justified. "We are aware that our Goal of $350,000 seems lofty, but there is a reason behind the number," the company said on its Kickstarter page. "The components of this system (screens, HDMI), the injection molding of the casings on the first run and the R&D still needed is very...very expensive." The $350,000 should fund the production of 1000 initial units. The Cross Plane, in turn, will have a price tag of $350. Its makers admit the price is steep, but claim it to be necessary to avoid making "a crap product." Gamers interested in the Cross Plane can pre-order one with a $349 Kickstarter contribution.

Source: Kickstarter

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I saw this mentioned in a thread the other day and I must say, it looks like a good idea and if I had enough money I would probably put some money towards their kickstarter.

Also, if it works well enough then it will probably make the Nvidia Shield worthless because it isn't tied to a specific set up.

That is pretty cool. Do wish it was smaller though. When I get paid it'll be something I put money towards.

As cool as the idea is, it looks awkward to hold and whatnot.

The idea isn't bad but the execution is poor. I could with a $350 price point, buy an off the shelf android tablet design from a SE Asia manufacture, add the HDMI receiver and buttons to the case. Then just develop control emulation software to run under android. That way there are no control packs and you get functionality of a tablet as well. The reason why I haven't, well I don't think there is a profit to be made at $350 to play games on small screen instead of a TV.

That is a pretty damn cool idea, but this absolutely needs to be proven and tried before bought... there are a million and one ways this could work badly or not at all, so for the love of god people wait to get some proper info out of this.
Also if they think 350k is lofty for hardware R&D then they are in for a rough ride, this shit is way more expensive to work out the kinks then any software project.

Can it somehow magically work through an internet connection? If not (which I'm guessing is the case), It won't be useful for the PC, since people still won't be able to use the PC for other things while someone is using this device.

I could see it being useful for consoles, since it frees up the TV.

Personally, I'd rather just get a ps4 and a vita. I've already tried streaming Shadow of the Colossus HD from my ps3 to my vita and it works pretty well and I'm already attached to the form factor of the vita. Plus I can play vita, psp, and ps1 games on the system without a connection

albino boo:
The idea isn't bad but the execution is poor. I could with a $350 price point, buy an off the shelf android tablet design from a SE Asia manufacture, add the HDMI receiver and buttons to the case. Then just develop control emulation software to run under android. That way there are no control packs and you get functionality of a tablet as well. The reason why I haven't, well I don't think there is a profit to be made at $350 to play games on small screen instead of a TV.

The Splashtop app actually does this but only for pc's and uses a house's wifi network. I have it for my tablet and it works pretty well in my house. You can then play games on your desktop using special on screen controls, or plug a controller or a keyboard dock and a mouse onto the tablet and play like that. I don't own the "gaming" version of the app cause it only works on Terga 4 tablets but for remoting my desktop it works fine. The only problem is that using it outside your home network requires a subscription but there would be way too much lag for that to work for me. But since Android is free, I don't see a reason they couldn't put it on this tablet so it can be used alone. Hell, then you can play android games and emulation with the control pad

Doom972:
Can it somehow magically work through an internet connection? If not (which I'm guessing is the case), It won't be useful for the PC, since people still won't be able to use the PC for other things while someone is using this device.

I could see it being useful for consoles, since it frees up the TV.

Its not that hard technically to do it over the internet, HDMI is digital signal anyway. You just need some device capable of turning the hdmi into ethernet frames, some sort of hardware web streaming server should do the job. The problem comes that the person with the device would have to open ports on their router and most domestic broadband connections have much lower up speeds than down speeds. You would need a decent bandwidth to stream the video and you would also have the lag issue that you get with online games.

Most PC's graphics cards have two outputs these days. I run my montoir on the dvi and have my tv plugged into the HDMI slot. I can half watch stuff on netflix on tv and play offline games at the same time. If your PC has enough grunt you can do the same via this device.

albino boo:

Doom972:
Can it somehow magically work through an internet connection? If not (which I'm guessing is the case), It won't be useful for the PC, since people still won't be able to use the PC for other things while someone is using this device.

I could see it being useful for consoles, since it frees up the TV.

Its not that hard technically to do it over the internet, HDMI is digital signal anyway. You just need some device capable of turning the hdmi into ethernet frames, some sort of hardware web streaming server should do the job. The problem comes that the person with the device would have to open ports on their router and most domestic broadband connections have much lower up speeds than down speeds. You would need a decent bandwidth to stream the video and you would also have the lag issue that you get with online games.

Due to domestic connection having low bandwith (especially regarding to upload), most public/workplace/college Wi-fi having low bandwith, and 3G connections having low bandwith, this is practically impossible anywhere except select few locations around the world.

Most PC's graphics cards have two outputs these days. I run my montoir on the dvi and have my tv plugged into the HDMI slot. I can half watch stuff on netflix on tv and play offline games at the same time. If your PC has enough grunt you can do the same via this device.

But if 2 seperate people would want to use the PC for different needs, the device and the keyboard/mouse/controller would coincide, making both people unable to perform their desired actions. If you just want a second screen for one person to do 2 things at once (like gaming and watching videos), you don't need this device - you need a second screen.

Why not just use the money to buy the Wii U AND a couple of games? And the company's name is a joke: Advanced Gaming Innovations. The production/"invention" of this Wii U gamepad clone completely contradicts with the company's name.

 

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