High-Altitude Organisms "Originated From Space," Claims Scientist

High-Altitude Organisms "Originated From Space," Claims Scientist

A team of British scientists believe they have found the first evidence of life arriving to Earth from Space.

A widely held belief when discussing the origin of life on planet Earth is that it all began here. However, there are still many diverse theories under the umbrella of Abiogenesis that could plausibly explain how we all came to be. Many have their roots embedded on Earth, but some that claimed a more direct extra-terrestrial involvement than meteorites simply carrying ice to Earth, never seemed to gain much traction. Now, with recent high altitude sampling of the upper atmosphere, a team of scientists claims to have found the first evidence of organisms to have originated from outer space.

The experiment, performed by the University of Sheffield, launched a balloon high into the stratosphere from Chester to collect samples at heights ranging from 22km to 27km. The rig carried microscope studs that were only exposed to the atmosphere upon reaching the designated heights before being sealed away for their descent. They returned to solid ground safely near Wakefield and the samples were quickly analyzed. The team discovered they had captured a diatom fragment and some biological organisms, which were considered an unusual find due to their large size. They were reportedly too large to have been carried up into the atmosphere from the Earth's surface.

The results were a huge surprise to the team, which saw them as a revolutionary breakthrough. "If life does continue to arrive from space then we have to completely change our view of biology and evolution," said Professor Milton Wainwright, who led the research team. "In the absence of a mechanism by which large particles like these can be transported to the stratosphere, we can only conclude that the biological entities originated from space." He goes on to postulate that with the evidence of life continuing to arrive on planet Earth, "life is not restricted to this planet and it almost certainly did not originate here."

He notes that there are indeed events on the planet that can eject such particles into the stratosphere, most notably a volcanic eruption. However, none occurred during the three year sampling process. This is by no means the end of the team's work, Professor Wainwright is hoping to extend the program with another balloon flight next month. With new samples, he hopes to carry out isotope fractionation. "If the ratio of certain isotopes gives one number then our organisms are from Earth, if it gives another, then they are from space. The tension will obviously be almost impossible to live with." The next tests are due to take place after the Haley's Comet meteorite shower where it is hoped that more new or unusual organisms will be found.

There are numerous ramifications of such data, should it be proved correct. These findings are the first physical evidence to point towards life beyond our atmosphere. If meteorites containing alien organisms are found to be traveling throughout the galaxy, it would be harder to deny the possibility of another Goldilocks planet becoming home to alien life.

Source: University of Sheffield

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What everyone fails to realize is that the Dinosaurs were actually highly evolved thinking creatures. They were having interplanetary war with some other culture who were using planet bombs to destroy their enemies (Think Gamalons from Star Blazers). Clearly, we as a species are merely the fallout of biological warfare waged eons ago by the enemies of the Dinos.

Why do scientists make these things so difficult. *eye roll*

Oh no, we're going to need to start breeding dragons to fight this thread from space.

Too large to be carried from earths surface by what force? Asteroid strikes send larger particles farther than that. Also, if life is surviving up there, they could have grown that large on smaller particles and not been transported from the surface in that size.

One word

Volcanoes

could have put some of this stuff in the atmosphere.

Jup, but why is it still up there?

Explanation: We killed all the dragons and flying stingrays (think KotOR Dantooine).

I mean if they are very light and have a big surface they may as well be floating, right?

this is more hipe then science,

The problem with extra terrestrial life is that we have not found a single sign of it. If something originated off the planet it would be rather easy to spot as it would not fit into any taxonomic classification, Even something like bacteria have strict requirements they must meet.

If it can be classified it has the same root as the rest of the life on earth, and the most likely explanation is still earth.

Pfft, the responses in this thread are exactly what you'd expect from alien filth.

Time to start firing wildly into the air, it's the only way to kill off all the invaders.

Either this is a break through in astro-biology, or the sampler picked up microbes off the ground. I'm guessing the latter.

So, are they implying that these organisms were caught in mid-air while they plummeted to their deaths? Am I supposed to imagine microbes flying around our solar system like comets? Or is it much more likely that these little guys either were light enough to stay up there after being expelled from a volcano, or contaminated the samples some time on the ground?

I'm guessing it was either contamination on the equipment from launch. It might even be stuff that was taken in to space on the surfaces of satellites/spacecraft and eventually got sprinkled back to earth. Did they find anything ALIVE or just the remains of something? Because I have doubts that life is just raining down nonchalantly from the depths of space for no good reason.

If Star Trek has taught us anything, it is that life on earth was seeded here by an advanced race. Other planets have also been seeded. Eventually we will meet these extended cousins, fit our DNA into a puzzle like structure, and receive an inspirational message from our common ancestor congratulating our peace loving temperment and teamwork.

One day, we're going to spend billions upon billions of dollars sending man to Mars or some further rock out there, and man will discover some non-terrestrial bacteria or something.

And then we'll spend a month or two getting really excited over it, and probably make commemorative coins and merchandise and whatnot.

And then we'll get back to our ordinary lives.

They have already explained that there had been no volcanic activity in the area of the test 3 years prior to them doing it so that theory is out. It's entirely possible that these organisms have been frozen in ice and traveled through space before getting here. If I'm right then a comet passing close (relatively) to earth could have held these things in the debris of their tail which is just a massive bunch of ice being pulled behind the comet.

While I would like to see a bit more evidence about this, I am more than open to the suggestion that these are little space creatures, there is no other suggestion of how they could get 27km up into the atmosphere that hasn't already been debunked.

So in conclusion, yes were not alone.

This is fascinating. I have no problem believing that its is within the realm of possibility. We do live in a galaxy powered by supermassive black holes and other mind-blowing anomolies, almost anything is possible (probably quite literally).

Large enough to not be carried normally, but did they think thier own baloon could have lifted it up and then it managed to split from the baloon somehow (wind?) and got into the sample?

Ruley:
"In the absence of a mechanism by which large particles like these can be transported to the stratosphere, we can only conclude that the biological entities originated from space." He goes on to postulate that with the evidence of life continuing to arrive on planet Earth, "life is not restricted to this planet and it almost certainly did not originate here."

These are rather extraordinary claims. Just because there's no known mechanism for getting those particles to that altitude doesn't indicate--at all--that they came from elsewhere. The simplest explanation is that these particles came from the planet whose atmosphere they were found in, and they got there through a mechanism we don't understand yet. I'm actually rather shocked at how quickly he jumped to extraterrestrial origin; he has no evidence for this. It's good that they're doing the isotope testing, but he should have waited until then to talk to the media. By jumping the gun like this, he stands to do a lot of damage not only to his own credibility, which is fine because he should learn to be less reckless, but to the credibility of his colleagues, which is unfortunate because many of them know not to do what he's doing.

Corralis:
They have already explained that there had been no volcanic activity in the area of the test 3 years prior to them doing it so that theory is out. It's entirely possible that these organisms have been frozen in ice and traveled through space before getting here. If I'm right then a comet passing close (relatively) to earth could have held these things in the debris of their tail which is just a massive bunch of ice being pulled behind the comet.

While I would like to see a bit more evidence about this, I am more than open to the suggestion that these are little space creatures, there is no other suggestion of how they could get 27km up into the atmosphere that hasn't already been debunked.

So in conclusion, yes were not alone.

simply by being able to identify it as a diatom they already have shown it was from earth as diatoms have a clear evolutionary path. This is just media hype, and it's about as good as a creationist paper in terms of evidence and writing.

Just imagine all the deaths that guy who jumped from near space caused on our high flying mini-brethren. So many tiny possible friends splatted against his angry falling body.

And to those wondering how they got up there....very tiny hot air balloons.

Shame the scientist jumped straight into ET as an explanation, i thought unbiased until proven was a big thing with them guys.

2 options exist with this. 1 its from earth, 2 its not. Whilst option 2 is more interesting option 1 is a lot more likely.

Do your tests first and prove its from outside the atmosphere and THEN tell the media so you dont look like a twonk when you find you were wrong after all.

It's a shot in the dark, but I have another (unlikely) possible explanation besides volcanoes: A severe stratospheric intrusion.
A biological fragment gets caught up in a very powerful storm updraft and lifts off with the intrusion when it retreats.

What's a Stratospheric Intrusion? It's when a BROAD column of air becomes so unstable (low pressure) for an extended period of time that the lower portion of the Stratosphere dips down to temporarily fill the void.

They do happen. In fact, we saw an immensely powerful intrusion last year; Superstorm Sandy; which produced such a broad, deep low pressure that it drew Stratospheric Ozone as far down as 850mb. On average, that's no more than a couple of kilometers from the surface; easily within the storm column.

Those don't occur very frequently, and the timing required to propel a "heavy" particulate like a biological fragment through the tropopause would be quite tiny indeed. I'm entirely sure if that's possible, but hey, it's a thought.

 

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