Square Enix Launches Crowdfunding Program for Indie Devs

Square Enix Launches Crowdfunding Program for Indie Devs

Square Enix Collective

Square Enix and IndieGoGo partner for Square Enix Collective, a platform for "creators to post ideas, and gamers to judge."

Various platforms are already available for facilitating communication early on between developers and gamers, letting potential players offer feedback for better or worse. Square Enix is jumping on board with their new platform called Collective. Developers pitch ideas to the community. The community of gamers decides whether the projects "should become reality or not," and Square Enix works with developers to evaluate and discuss ideas, including whether something needs to be added to make the idea work.

Submitting a pitch is free, but submitters will need to agree to terms and conditions, naturally. What those are is unknown at the moment. After submitting the pitch, Square Enix evaluates the idea to verify it meets the submission parameters and to ensure it has a realistic budgeting plan. The community then has a chance to provide feedback through Collective. After 28 days if the community has shown support, it will open on Indiegogo for crowdfunding. Square Enix also stated members of the community can continue to be a part of the development process "and maybe even the chance to help take tough or key design decisions too." While some developers may like the idea of communicating with the audience early on, giving your audience the ability to make development decisions might not sit well with others.

"Collective encourages an open development process, and as much transparency and communication with the community around decision-making during the development phase as possible," the official site states.

Square Enix stated developers will have a chance to work with some of the older Eidos IP, meaning developers might be able to work with some of Square Enix's own properties. More information about submission parameters and IP selection will be made available at GDC Next from Nov. 5 to 7 in Los Angeles.

Source: Square Enix Collective

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Isn't the point of crowd funding to allow developers to make games WITHOUT having to deal with publishers?

I want to say this is a good thing, but what overrides such thoughts is the realisation that these indie games better sell >3.4 million copies, or be branded "disappointing"..

Seems like a lot of hoops though - a lot of stages at which a game could just fall flat through a lack of interest/backing. Maybe that's pretty much the way it is already in other places, or even more streamlined than elsewhere - just more transparent.

Or, wait, should I be pleased for more opportunities for small outfits to get their ideas brought forth and put to market? Or be scoffing at it for the indie band-wagon jumping and the resultant new glut of platformers?

Someone tell me what to think.

How long, do you think, until EA does the exact same thing? Not surprising a developer wants a share of that free money, but why do it through Square Enix? What benefits are they adding by going through them other than being able to possibly use their IPs?

It would be great if some indidevelopers got the chance to make a Chrono Trigger, Chrono Cross, FF1-9 sequel, but there's no reason to bring a new IP to this.

Well we all knew this day will come.
But no Square I will not fund you to take peoples IPs and then fuck them up, you can do that all by your lonesome.

Yea, I don't buy it. What is Square Enix, a developer, publisher, and holder of IP, doing to help the 'kickstarter relationship' (IE: Donator and developer), more than what already occurs?

Definitely a potential problem of some kickstarters, so some good here, but I also see plenty of bad coming out of it. Isn't this all a publisher does, concerning game development anyway?

This is definitely a forward-thinking move by SE to get involved with kickstarter ,especially for IP that they can't find the funds' to develop. Forward-thinking, not necessarily good for the consumer, avoidant of bullshit, or even profitable.

A possibly interesting thought:
I think the publisher-consumer problem lies in the fact that publishers are the ones closest to caring simply about the money made from selling games, next to the developers (especially those linked to publishers). As for us consumers of games, coupled with constant news updates like this, it's developers who are the closest to caring about the games themselves, next to consumers of games.

Sounds to me is they want indie developers to make games based on their IP, have other people fund it, and then get some of the profits.

Orange12345:
Isn't the point of crowd funding to allow developers to make games WITHOUT having to deal with publishers?

I guess Square Enix wants to fight the power! And dip their filthy hands on crowdfunded games' earnings! Is this greed or what?

Also, crowdfunded games don't sell that much copies. Usually around only 70000 (like mighty No. 9) on pledge deadline. Since these are generally niche games that don't aim to "appeal to a broader audience". I doubt it would reach 3M during its entire lifecycle. A number they would call an EPIC FAIL regardless of how good the game is.

Anyway, it's just their attempt at remaining relevant in a world that increasingly wants to do away with publishers.

No thanks Sqeenix! I already have a favorite crowdfunding platform that I trust! It's called Kickstarter and I love it! Mighty No. 9 FTW!

I too am a little apprehensive on this. I want to like the idea, but I find it more redundant than beneficial.

I think in a way it actually does make a little degree of sense, considering Square Enix has lost any real hope of being a company that creates games people want to play. Really SE has gotten to the point where they are far more effective publishing and distributing content than they have been able to manufacture it for a VERY long time now.

I really don't see the issue with this. Smaller developers get the chance to work with IPs that anyone can admit Square seems to have little interest in developing themselves, plus the get the backing and clout of Square if their projects generate enough interest.

So Squeenix have decided to combine kickstarter and focus groups in to one thing and will undoutedly take some of the proceeds from anything that gets though. I don't really see what they can really add besides telling people they have a terrible budget plan, which they aren't exactly great at themselves if selling 3+ million copies of a game is still unprofitable.

Although maybe this will mean they let someone make some decent Final Fantasy games.

Teoes:
I want to say this is a good thing, but what overrides such thoughts is the realisation that these indie games better sell >3.4 million copies, or be branded "disappointing"..

Seems like a lot of hoops though - a lot of stages at which a game could just fall flat through a lack of interest/backing. Maybe that's pretty much the way it is already in other places, or even more streamlined than elsewhere - just more transparent.

Or, wait, should I be pleased for more opportunities for small outfits to get their ideas brought forth and put to market? Or be scoffing at it for the indie band-wagon jumping and the resultant new glut of platformers?

Someone tell me what to think.

if you want people to tell you what to think, maybe you should start your own indie crowdfunding program

Ugh, what a miserable turn of events. They are going to use someone's submitted idea, crowdfund it, and then reap all the profits. They will undoubtedly use ridiculous microtransactions to further push their profits. The point of crowdfunding is to avoid publishers like SE, not give them ideas and pay for the games to be made for them.

I've said my bit on this in the regular Game Discussion topic.
As long as Squeenix doesn't meddle or interfere with the development too much (it can't be absolute, obviously, even publishers have sensible limits of what they can get away with) this may open the door to them letting developers who actually care do things with their otherwise dead or niche IP.

Of course, if they do interfere too much, it'll just turn into the publisher-honeypot every cynic is expecting it to be. At which point I doubt any prospective developers would bother. Not with how many other crowdfunding avenues are out there that seem to work (a little early to say they work for certain; I've seen my share of big hits and big misses).

We'll have to see what actually goes down.

 

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